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How can I overload the |= operator on a strongly typed (scoped) enum (in C++11, GCC)?

I want to test, set and clear bits on strongly typed enums. Why strongly typed? Because my books say it is good practice. But this means I have to static_cast<int> everywhere. To prevent this, I overload the | and & operators, but I can't figure out how to overload the |= operator on an enum. For a class you'd simply put the operator definition in the class, but for enums that doesn't seem to work syntactically.

This is what I have so far:

enum class NumericType
{
    None                    = 0,

    PadWithZero             = 0x01,
    NegativeSign            = 0x02,
    PositiveSign            = 0x04,
    SpacePrefix             = 0x08
};

inline NumericType operator |(NumericType a, NumericType b)
{
    return static_cast<NumericType>(static_cast<int>(a) | static_cast<int>(b));
}

inline NumericType operator &(NumericType a, NumericType b)
{
    return static_cast<NumericType>(static_cast<int>(a) & static_cast<int>(b));
}

The reason I do this: this is the way it works in strongly-typed C#: an enum there is just a struct with a field of its underlying type, and a bunch of constants defined on it. But it can have any integer value that fits in the enum's hidden field.

And it seems that C++ enums work in the exact same way. In both languages casts are required to go from enum to int or vice versa. However, in C# the bitwise operators are overloaded by default, and in C++ they aren't.

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3  
I'm not sure this makes sense. The individual bits are enumerated, but PadWithZero | NegativeSign = 0x03 which is not a valid enumerated constant. –  Useless Apr 8 '13 at 21:38
1  
@Useless Yeah it's just an example based on a C++11 version of a sequence of NUMERICTYPE_ defines found in Linux 0.1 used to implement printf. Does the result have to be a member of the original enumeration? I come from a C# background and expected scoped enums to behave like those in C#. –  Virtlink Apr 8 '13 at 21:40
3  
I'm saying your enumerated type is not closed under |, so it doesn't make sense to coerce it into an (illegal value of) that type. Enumerate the flag constant values, but let a combination of flags be an int. –  Useless Apr 8 '13 at 21:43
2  
@Useless - the value is not illegal. Any value that fits in the bits is okay. That kind of bit mask is done all the time, and there's nothing wrong with it. –  Pete Becker Apr 8 '13 at 22:54
1  
I'd say a combination of NumericType is a set, which is a different type than NumericType. Why don't you just create a NumericTypeSet class or something ? It would probably make much more sense semanticaly speaking. –  ereOn Apr 8 '13 at 23:31

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted
inline NumericType& operator |=(NumericType& a, NumericType b)
{
    return a= a |b;
}

This works?

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1  
No, this is undefined behavior because you're returning a local variable by reference. –  Luchian Grigore Apr 8 '13 at 21:45
2  
No: Reference to local variable 'a' returned –  Virtlink Apr 8 '13 at 21:45
    
Now it won't work for temporaries... –  Luchian Grigore Apr 8 '13 at 21:54
3  
@Luchian Grigore. Hmmm, but 'a' have to be an lvalue. We use 'a|=b'. 'b' can be a temporary but 'a' not. or? (and Thank!) –  qPCR4vir Apr 8 '13 at 22:01
1  
ah, true. good point. –  Luchian Grigore Apr 8 '13 at 22:02

This seems to work for me:

NumericType operator |= (NumericType &a, NumericType b) {
    unsigned ai = static_cast<unsigned>(a);
    unsigned bi = static_cast<unsigned>(b);
    ai |= bi;
    return a = static_cast<NumericType>(ai);
}

However, you may still consider defining a class for your collection of enum bits:

class NumericTypeFlags {
    unsigned flags_;
public:
    NumericTypeFlags () : flags_(0) {}
    NumericTypeFlags (NumericType t) : flags_(static_cast<unsigned>(t)) {}
    //...define your "bitwise" test/set operations
};

Then, change your | and & operators to return NumericTypeFlags instead.

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Your class has a hidden inner field, just like an enum. But it doesn't have its constants, so as soon as you encounter a method that expects a NumericTypeFlags you get no help from your development environment whatsoever. –  Virtlink Apr 9 '13 at 1:54
1  
@Virtlink: It provides better type safety than a plain unsigned. It has better semantics than creating a NumericType with a value not in the enum. The implementation of the interface can make sure that only NumericType compatible arguments are used for testing and setting. In short, the help goes to the user of the class, at the cost of some work from the implementor to make it helpful to the user. –  jxh Apr 9 '13 at 2:08
    
@Virtlink: A sample implementation. –  jxh Apr 9 '13 at 2:55

By combining distinct values to make new, undefined values, you are totally contradicting the strong-typing paradigm.

It looks like you are setting individual flag bits that are completely independent. In this case, it does not make sense to combine your bits into a datatype where such a combination yields an undefined value.

You should decide on the size of your flag data (char, short, long, long long) and roll with it. You can, however, use specific types to test, set and clear flags:

typedef enum
{
    PadWithZero             = 0x01,
    NegativeSign            = 0x02,
    PositiveSign            = 0x04,
    SpacePrefix             = 0x08
} Flag;

typedef short Flags;

void SetFlag( Flags & flags, Flag f )
{
    flags |= static_cast<Flags>(f);
}

void ClearFlag( Flags & flags, Flag f )
{
    flags &= ~static_cast<Flags>(f);
}

bool TestFlag( const Flags flags, Flag f )
{
    return (flags & static_cast<Flags>)(f)) == static_cast<Flags>(f);
}

This is very basic, and is fine when each flag is only a single bit. For masked flags, it's a bit more complex. There are ways to encapsulate bit flags into a strongly-typed class, but it really has to be worth it. In your case, I'm not convinced that it is.

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1  
Just because enums appear to work in that way, it doesn't make it right to abuse the underlying type. Strong typing exists specifically to stop you from doing this. –  paddy Apr 8 '13 at 22:23
2  
@paddy - this kind of thing is quite common. The values that an enumerated type can represent are not restricted to the named enumerators; they can be any value that fits in the enum's bits (loosely speaking). Having to provide names for all the possible combinations here would be at best tedious. –  Pete Becker Apr 8 '13 at 22:56
1  
@PeteBecker: Being common doesn't necessarily make it right. Sure people have been doing that for years or perhaps even decades. But to me, combining two elements of a same set in such a way should result in an object type that is designed to store combinations, not in the originating type itself. –  ereOn Apr 8 '13 at 23:38
1  
@ereOn - sure, if you think of an enumerated type as a set, you get constraints that aren't part of the properties of an enumerated type. You can, of course, restrict your use of enumerated types to match that restrictive model. That doesn't mean that people who use their full capabilities are abusing them. The standard was carefully written to allow exactly this sort of use. –  Pete Becker Apr 9 '13 at 0:25
1  
This was probably always destined to solicit debate. The way I see it, the semantics of an enumeration is to provide distinct values which are the only possible values for that type. I still hold that, while it's totally legit to declare the individual bits as an enumeration, it's semantically incorrect to use the same type to store a combination of those bits. When you break semantics, you go against strong typing. So you have to make a choice between the two. You cannot combine broken semantics with strong typing. –  paddy Apr 9 '13 at 0:48

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