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Alright, people of Stack Overflow, I have a question for you: I am in a web design class at my high school and learning ahead of the class since I already knew the first half of the class. I was asked by my teacher if I could teach what I have learned about Javascript and I agreed. However, one of the things she wanted me to teach is not working for me when I try it out on my own. I am trying to do a simple check for a variable that when you input a name into a box, if it is my name or the teacher's name it pulls up a popup that says "welcome" or something like that, and if it is anyone else it says "go away" the only issue is that no matter what I try something in the code is not working. This is a test function that I have at the moment; it is intended to print out the

<!doctype html>
<html>

<head>


<script type="text/javascript">
    var name = document.KageForm.User.value;

      function validator(){
        alert(name);

    }
    </script>

    </head>
    <body>

    <form name="KageForm">
        Username:<input type="text" name="User">
    <br/>
        Password: <input type="password" name="pass">
    <br/>
    <input type="button"value="Submit" onclick="validator()" />
    </form>


    <script type="text/javascript">
    </script>
</body>
</html>

Here is the full version of the code that I am trying to get to work:

<!doctype html>
<html>

<head>


<script type="text/javascript">
    var name = document.KageForm.User.value;

      function validator(){
if(name=="Kage Kaldaka"){
            alert("Eeyup")};
        else
            alert("Nnope");
    }
    </script>

    </head>
    <body>

    <form name="KageForm">
        Username:<input type="text" name="User">
    <br/>
        Password: <input type="password" name="pass">
    <br/>
    <input type="button"value="Submit" onclick="validator()" />
    </form>
    </body>
    </html>
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4 Answers 4

You have several issues here:

  • You have a semicolon after the if statement
  • You are reading the name value on page load, at a point when the input field hasn't even been added to the page yet and certainly hasn't been filled out by the user yet. You need to read it when the user submits the form, i.e. you need to move the name assignment inside the validator method:

JS:

function validator(){
    var name = document.KageForm.User.value;
    if(name=="Kage Kaldaka"){
        alert("Eeyup");
    } else {
        alert("Nnope");
    }
}
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Thank you so much! This is my first time doing something like this, so I did not know about that part with the variable. –  Kage Kaldaka Apr 9 '13 at 13:35
    
If you would not mind, I had another question that I think is relatively simple: for some reason, whenever I call a function that uses document.write in it from a button or input, it erases all the styling I have on the page. Do you know what would cause this? –  Kage Kaldaka Apr 9 '13 at 13:52
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There shouldn't be a semicolon after the if. You also have to put the variable inside the function to make it update:

function validator(){
    var name = document.KageForm.User.value;
    if(name=="Kage Kaldaka"){
        alert("Eeyup")
    } else {
        alert("Nnope");
    }
}

JSFiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/FhCTc/1/

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You are setting your variable outside your function:

<script type="text/javascript">
var name = document.KageForm.User.value;

function validator(){
  if(name=="Kage Kaldaka"){
        alert("Eeyup")};
    else
        alert("Nnope");
}
</script>

This means var name is set when the page loads, but no other times. Move it into validator().

You also ended your if with a semi-colon, which would cause an error on the else portion.

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Besides all the previous answers it is in good manner in JavaScript to use === not ==

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What do you mean with "good manner". It has nothing to do with manners, those two operators mean different things. –  Steve Apr 8 '13 at 22:54
    
You are right, but it is important to know the difference between them. In this case == and === has the same effect but when you don't need to use ==, I believe === should be used. It is like 'use strict' argue there are lot of arguments for both sides. This are my thoughts, I read banch of articles and I think it is a good habit. –  Bogna Anna Ka Apr 8 '13 at 23:00
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