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I am trying to compose a SELECT statement for MySQL which select from table A what does not exist in table B. For example:

Table A:

+------+
| BAND |
+------+
| 1    |
| 2    |
| 3    |
| 4    |
| 5    |
+------+

Table B:

+------+
| HATE |
+------+
| 1    |
| 5    |
+------+

So if table A is all bands, and table B is the bands I hate, then I only want bands I do NOT hate. So the result of a select should be:

+------+
| BAND |
+------+
| 2    |
| 3    |
| 4    |
+------+

How would I write a single select for this? Here was my last attempt:

SELECT * FROM A LEFT JOIN B ON A.BAND = B.HATE WHERE B.HATE IS NULL;

EDIT: The line above has been fixed! See comments below..."= NULL" versus "IS NULL".

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1  
@Michelle your query seems to be ok. why do you say it doesn't work? –  Barranka Apr 8 '13 at 22:57
    
See my comment below. For anyone else with the same problem "IS NULL" is not the same as "= NULL" in MySQL. I tried one way and the query works, the other way it returns an empty set. Strange!!! –  Generation D Systems Apr 10 '13 at 18:29
    
Not only in MySQL, but on any SQL dialect. The NULL value in SQL has the property of being different to any other value, including another NULL. Because of that, you can't expect = NULL to work on a SQL query... you need to use IS NULL. –  Barranka Dec 26 '13 at 16:06

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I would use a join

select A.*
from A left join B on A.BAND = B.HATE
where B.HATE IS NULL;

Remember: Create the appropriate indexes for your table

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That's almost identical to what I tried (see response above). You ask for only A.* in return from select statement...perhaps that's the issue. –  Generation D Systems Apr 8 '13 at 22:58
    
and it should give you the right answer! (by the way, I posted this before your edit). This should return what you need. Or why do you say it is not returning what you need? –  Barranka Apr 8 '13 at 23:00
    
OK - I found the problem! I was testing for "B.HATE = NULL", not "B.HATE IS NULL". My text above was what I used to create my SQL command, but when I actually typed the code (into a PHP string) I changed it to = NULL. Strange that they are different!? –  Generation D Systems Apr 10 '13 at 18:28
    
@Michelle As far as I know, in SQL NULL is different to any other value, including other NULL. It is usual to find things like a == Null in programming languages, but (at least) in MySQL, if you want to filter null values, you need to use IS NULL to test a null value, or the ISNULL() function, which returns TRUE if the argument is null –  Barranka Apr 10 '13 at 18:32

You can use IN, but it's super inefficient:

SELECT * FROM tableA WHERE id NOT IN (SELECT id FROM tableB)
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Why is this better than using a join? –  Matt Ball Apr 8 '13 at 22:48
1  
I would think this is slow if tables A or B are big (for small tables, the performance difference is practically nothing) –  Barranka Apr 8 '13 at 22:55
1  
I never said it was better, I actually say the opposite. IN sucks, because it runs the inner query for every row checked (so, for each row in tableA). –  Sheep Slapper Apr 8 '13 at 22:57
SELECT * FROM tableA WHERE id NOT EXISTS (SELECT DISTINCT id FROM tableB)

or

SELECT * FROM tableA WHERE id NOT EXISTS (SELECT id FROM tableB GROUP BY id)
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SELECT BAND FROM A WHERE BAND NOT EXISTS(SELECT DISTINCT HATE FROM B)

OR

SELECT BAND FROM A WHERE NOT EXISTS ( SELECT HATE FROM B WHERE A.BAND = B.HATE);

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