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I have a container with a defined height containing two divs, the first which has a pixel-defined height and the second which I would like to fill the remaining space of its container, i.e. 100% minus first div's pixel-defined height.

Is there a solution to this problem which doesn't involve JavaScript? I can use a JavaScript solution (and in fact JavaScript changing the container's height is what brought me here), but this seems like it should have lower-level support, and this looks like it might become quite a cascading problem.

Example

http://jsfiddle.net/h3gsz/1/

HTML

<div id="container">
    <div id="top_content"></div>
    <div id="remaining_content"></div>
</div>

CSS

#container {
    width: 400px;
    height: 400px;
    border: 5px solid black;
}
#top_content {
    background-color: blue;
    width: 100%;
    height: 50px;
}
#remaining_content {
    background-color: red;
    width: 100%;
    height: 100%;
}

Edit

An answer was already provided for the original fiddle, but in simplifying the question I allowed the answer to introduce new problems: http://jsfiddle.net/h3gsz/6/

I had removed the inline-block styling and a max-width value. Given the absolute positioning of the remaining content, the container's width is no longer defined by said content (from inline-block), so a horizontal scrollbar is introduced where there shouldn't be one.

I'm not sure if I should simply make a new question or not.

share|improve this question
    
if you give 350px to the remaining_content what will happen? –  zod Apr 8 '13 at 23:22
    
The issue is that I want to resize the container to fill the viewport, but I don't want to then have to resize every element within this container, and elements within those elements. Maybe I made this question too general for my specific problem. –  M. Herold Apr 8 '13 at 23:32

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted
#container {
    width: 400px;
    height: 400px;
    border: 5px solid black;
    position: relative;
}
#top_content {
    background-color: blue;
    width: 100%;
    height: 50px;
}
#remaining_content {
    background-color: red;
    width: 100%;
    top: 50px;
    bottom: 0;
    position: absolute;
}

http://jsfiddle.net/h3gsz/4/

share|improve this answer
    
Whoa, I didn't know you could define both of those values. This may very well be the solution I was looking for! –  M. Herold Apr 8 '13 at 23:35
1  
I would also add overflow: auto to #remaining_content to make sure all content is accessible. It is good to be cautious with fixed-height containers. –  Marc Audet Apr 8 '13 at 23:47
    
Yes, that is in fact already present in my existing code, but not in the small example I provided. Unfortunately, this solution plays games with the inline-block style I omitted (absolute positioning removes it from defining its container's width), so I'm still in a pickle: jsfiddle.net/h3gsz/6 –  M. Herold Apr 9 '13 at 0:07
    
Can't you just replace max-width with width? jsfiddle.net/h3gsz/7 –  Alqin Apr 9 '13 at 1:01
    
Unfortunately, I want it to wrap the content tightly. That said, I believe that is the concession I will ultimately have to make. –  M. Herold Apr 9 '13 at 17:32

How about using overflow:hidden;?

#container {
    width: 400px;
    height: 400px;
    border: 5px solid black;
    overflow:hidden;
}

JSFiddle.

share|improve this answer
    
The problem with using overflow: hidden is that the content may become inaccessible if the user increases the font size or if this is in CMS, some user decides to cut an paste a small essay worth of words. –  Marc Audet Apr 8 '13 at 23:44

Why not just use auto?

http://jsfiddle.net/h3gsz/3/

CSS:

#container {
  width: 400px;
  height: auto;
  border: 5px solid black;
}
#top_content {
  background-color: blue;
  width: 100%;
  height: 50px;
}
#remaining_content {
  background-color: red;
  width: 100%;
  height: auto;
}
share|improve this answer

you could also do it by using display:table; fiddle here

.main, .sidebar {
float: none;
padding: 20px;
vertical-align: top;
}

.container {
display: table;
}

.main {
width: 400px;
background-color: LightSlateGrey;
display: table-cell;
}

.sidebar {
width: 200px;
display: table-cell;
background-color: Tomato;
}
share|improve this answer
    
That content is tiled horizontally, though. –  M. Herold Apr 9 '13 at 0:13

Someone more experienced might have a better option but you can try this :

#container { 
width: 400px; 
height: 400px; 
border: 5px solid black;
overflow: hidden ;
}  
#top_content { 
background-color: blue;
width: 100%;
height: 50px; 
} 
#remaining_content { 
background-color: red; 
width: 100%; 
height: 100%; 
margin-bottom: 0;
} 

Depending on what you want to use this for you could remove the #remaining_content <div>

HTML:

<div id="container">
  <div id="top_content"></div>
</div>

CSS:

#container {
  background-color: green;
  width: 400px;
  height: relative;
  min-height:400px;
  border: 5px solid black;
  overflow:none;
  word-wrap:break-word;
}
#top_content {
  background-color: blue;
  width: 100%;
  height: 50px;
}
share|improve this answer

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