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I am having this strange issue that I cannot seem to figure out. Up until now, my transform methods seemed to have worked almost flawlessly, but the tool I am currently building is causing me some major headaches.

Here are my methods:

This one works without error and produces the proper XML

    public static void transform(String filename, String filePath, String stylesheetPath, String outputTo, boolean prettyPrint, boolean excludeDeclaration) throws TransformerException, IOException {
        if (!new File(outputTo).exists()) new File(outputTo).mkdir();

        TransformerFactory factory = TransformerFactory.newInstance();
        Source xsl = new StreamSource(new File(stylesheetPath));
        Templates template = factory.newTemplates(xsl);
        Transformer transformer = template.newTransformer();
        if (!prettyPrint) {
            transformer.setOutputProperty(OutputKeys.INDENT, "no");
        } else {
            transformer.setOutputProperty(OutputKeys.INDENT, "yes");
            transformer.setOutputProperty("{http://xml.apache.org/xslt}indent-amount", "4");
        }
        if (excludeDeclaration) transformer.setOutputProperty(OutputKeys.OMIT_XML_DECLARATION, "yes");

        Source xml = new StreamSource(new File(filePath + filename));
        OutputStream outputStream = new FileOutputStream(outputTo + filename);
        transformer.transform(xml, new StreamResult(outputStream));
        outputStream.close();
    }

Using the same XSLT, the following produces XML (or something from XML) that contains only Text nodes (no elements, attributes, etc)

    public static Document transformInMemory(Document xmlDoc, String stylesheetPath) throws TransformerException, ParserConfigurationException, SAXException, IOException {
        TransformerFactory factory = TransformerFactory.newInstance();
        Source xsl = new StreamSource(new File(stylesheetPath));
        Templates template = factory.newTemplates(xsl);
        Transformer transformer = template.newTransformer();
        transformer.setOutputProperty(OutputKeys.INDENT, "no");
        transformer.setOutputProperty("{http://xml.apache.org/xslt}indent-amount", "0");

        DOMSource source = new DOMSource(xmlDoc);
        ByteArrayOutputStream baos = new ByteArrayOutputStream();
        transformer.transform(source, new StreamResult(baos));

        System.out.println(baos.toString());

        // load into DocumentBuilder
        DocumentBuilderFactory domFactory = DocumentBuilderFactory.newInstance();
        DocumentBuilder builder = domFactory.newDocumentBuilder();
        InputSource is = new InputSource(new ByteArrayInputStream(baos.toByteArray()));
        return builder.parse(is);
    }

From all the searching I have been doing, it doesn't appear that I am doing anything incorrectly in the second method, but it sure is producing some weird results.

Sample result (unfortunately, I cannot post the actual data, so I just replaced the text with other data)

    <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>








                     Some Text Here









                                                        A.



                                                   Some other text here









                                                        B.



                                                   Some more text here









                                                        C.



                                                   And more text here









                                                        D.



                                                   Even more text here















                     A

                1

I purposely left result formatted so you could see exactly what I am seeing. The above result is what is produced by the System.out.println(baos.toString());. If I highlight the text in my console (Eclipse), the indentions are all there, but all elements, etc are not showing up.

So, my question: Can anyone tell me what could possibly be going on? Why does the first one work without any problems, but the second cause the result above?

EDIT:

After playing around with my method, I figured out a workaround that seems to work. Instead of using DOMSource, I converted the xmlDoc to an InputStream, but this just seems a bit hacky. Any thoughts as to why DOMSource would be causing this problem?

    public static Document transformInMemory(Document xmlDoc, String stylesheetPath) throws TransformerException, ParserConfigurationException, SAXException, IOException {
        TransformerFactory factory = TransformerFactory.newInstance();
        Source xsl = new StreamSource(new File(stylesheetPath));
        Templates template = factory.newTemplates(xsl);
        Transformer transformer = template.newTransformer();
        transformer.setOutputProperty(OutputKeys.INDENT, "no");
        transformer.setOutputProperty("{http://xml.apache.org/xslt}indent-amount", "0");

        // convert the xmlDoc to an inputstream
        ByteArrayOutputStream xmlOutStream = new ByteArrayOutputStream();
        Source domSource = new DOMSource(xmlDoc);
        Result result = new StreamResult(xmlOutStream);
        TransformerFactory.newInstance().newTransformer().transform(domSource, result);
        InputStream in = new ByteArrayInputStream(xmlOutStream.toByteArray());

        //DOMSource source = new DOMSource(xmlDoc);
        ByteArrayOutputStream baos = new ByteArrayOutputStream();
        Source source = new StreamSource(in);
        transformer.transform(source, new StreamResult(baos));

        System.out.println("baos -> " + baos.toString());

        // load into DocumentBuilder
        DocumentBuilderFactory domFactory = DocumentBuilderFactory.newInstance();
        DocumentBuilder builder = domFactory.newDocumentBuilder();
        InputSource is = new InputSource(new ByteArrayInputStream(baos.toByteArray()));
        return builder.parse(is);
    }
share|improve this question
    
I've had this happen when I forget to have my XSL copy the element nodes. Are you sure you are passing exactly the same XSL file to both methods? –  VGR Apr 9 '13 at 0:05
    
@VGR Yes, I am absolutely sure. –  Ashaelon Apr 9 '13 at 3:06

1 Answer 1

DocumentBuilder by default isn't namespace-aware. You need to setNamespaceAware(true). Without namespace awareness, the template rules in the stylesheet won't match, so the default template rules kick in, and these simply output the text nodes.

Note that creating a DOM merely to provide input to XSLT is a really bad idea; using the XSLT processor's native tree representation will almost certainly work better.

share|improve this answer
    
So what should I change DOMSource to since xmlDoc is of type org.w3c.Document? That was the way I saw a lot of examples done. –  Ashaelon Apr 9 '13 at 14:56
    
If you've already got a DOM, and you're stuck with it, then this is fine. Just don't create the DOM specially for the purpose of transforming it. However, I see my response was wrong - you're creating the DocumentBuilder after doing the transformation, so it can't be the culprit. Perhaps the DOM you were handed wasn't built with namespace awareness. –  Michael Kay Apr 9 '13 at 20:56
    
I read in an XML file, but have to do some manipulating before I can transform it. Rather than suffering from the cost of disk IO, I just pass the Document to be transformed. The document I create is not namespace aware, so if what you say is true, then I guess that could very well be the culprit. I will give this a try, but it may take me a few days to test and respond. Thank you for your suggestions. I'm still considerably new to Java and XML processing and still have a huge learning curve ahead of me. Any help or suggestions are much appreciated. –  Ashaelon Apr 9 '13 at 21:16
    
Well, firstly I'd suggest doing the "manipulating" in XSLT (or XQuery) rather than in Java. Failing that, I'd suggest using a modern tree model such as XOM, JDOM2, or Axiom in preference to DOM: the newer models are preferable in every respect. –  Michael Kay Apr 9 '13 at 23:03
    
By manipulating, I mean sometimes I have to combine XML files for the transform to work, and most of the time I have to gather information from a spreadsheet and insert it into the XML. That probably sounds odd, but it is what it is. I will definitely look into XOM, JDOM2, and Axiom to see how to use those instead of DOM. Again, I appreciate your suggestions. –  Ashaelon Apr 10 '13 at 15:25

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