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REQ FLOW :

____________      LOGIN           ___________
|          |------------------->>|          |
|  CLIENT  |      LOGIN ACK      |  SERVER  |
|__________|<<------------------ |__________|

The client and the server sends across the contents of the files they open.

CODE:

SERVER

$socket = new IO::Socket::INET ( LocalHost => '127.0.0.1', LocalPort => '0155', Proto => 'tcp', Listen => 1, Reuse => 1 ) or die "Oops: $! \n";

print "Waiting for the Client.\n";

while($clientsocket = $socket->accept()){


print   "Connected from : ", $clientsocket->peerhost();
print   ", Port : ", $clientsocket->peerport(), "\n";

while(<$clientsocket>){
    if($_ ne "\$END\$\n"){
            print"Message received from Client : $_";
        print $clientsocket $_;
}
    else{
    print"\$END\$\n";  
}   
} last;
}

login_ack();
sub login_ack{

# Some code removed for the purpose of posting                          
open (LOGINACK, "login_ack.txt") || die "Cannot open login acknowledgment file $!\n";
my @loginack=<LOGINACK>;
close LOGINACK;                         
open(LOG, ">>logfile.txt");

foreach $loginack(@loginack) {
    if($loginack ne "\$END\$\n"){
        print $clientsocket $loginack;
        print LOG $loginack;
        print $loginack;
    }
    else{
        print"\$END\$\n";   
    }
}

CLIENT

$socket = new IO::Socket::INET ( PeerHost => '127.0.0.1', PeerPort => '0155', Proto => 'tcp', Reuse => 1) or die "$!\n";

print "Connected to the Server.\n";

send_login();
sub send_login{

# Some code removed for the purpose of posting                              
open (LOGIN, "Login.txt") || die "Cannot open login file $!\n";
my @login=<LOGIN>;
close LOGIN;                            
open(LOG, ">>logfile.txt");

foreach $login(@login) {
     if($login ne "\$END\$\n"){
        print $socket $login;
        print LOG $login;
        print $login;
    }
    else{
    print"\$END\$\n"; 
    }
}
} 
LOGINACK : while(<$socket>){
        print"Message received from Server : $_";
        print $socket $_; 
        last LOGINACK;
}

PRESENT OUTPUT:

enter image description here

DESIRED OUTPUT:

CLIENT

Connected to the Server.
this is Login
SAS4
50
SAS_ACTION LOGIN
LOGIN bss
PASSWORD cleint
$END$
Message received from Server : this is Login Ack
Message received from Server : SAS4
Message received from Server : 61
Message received from Server : SAS_ACTION LOGIN_ACK
Message received from Server : ACK_STATUS 0
Message received from Server : ACK_MESSAGE Logged In
Message received from Server : $END$        

SERVER

Waiting for the Client.
Connected from : 127.0.0.1, Port : 1862
Message received from Client : this is Login
Message received from Client : SAS4
Message received from Client : 50
Message received from Client : SAS_ACTION LOGIN
Message received from Client : LOGIN bss
Message received from Client : PASSWORD cleint
Message received from Client : $END$
this is Login Ack
SAS4
61
SAS_ACTION LOGIN_ACK
ACK_STATUS 0
ACK_MESSAGE Logged In
$END$
share|improve this question
    
By the way, while (...) { ...; last } is a silly way of writing if (...) { ... } –  ikegami Apr 9 '13 at 15:12
    
IO::Socket::INET->new returns the error in $@, not $!. –  ikegami Apr 9 '13 at 15:17
    
Are you really running your server on privileged port 0155 (which is octal; the port number is 109 decimal)? So you're running as root? Ick, and likewise yuck! Especially while you're developing, use a non-privileged port (number bigger than 1023) and don't run as root unless you have to. –  Jonathan Leffler Apr 15 '13 at 16:48
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Revised Edition of Answer

This code includes 3 scripts:

  1. serverJ.pl which is an iterative server, processing one request at a time, but continuing to process multiple requests;
  2. clientJ.pl which is a simple client that sends the login request from the Login.txt file and echoes what it receives from the server; and
  3. clientQ.pl which sends a QUIT message to the server.

I've left the code using old-fashioned file handles rather than upgrading to modern lexical file handles, but I changed to the 3-argument form of open. One other change is that most messages are prefixed with $$:, the Perl process ID. I would not have labelled the INNER: loop except for symmetry with the OUTER: loop, which does need a label. It is not clear that the functions send_login() and abc() are needed in clientJ.pl; they are left in deference to the original code.

serverJ.pl

#!/usr/bin/env perl
use strict;
use warnings;
use IO::Socket::INET;

my $socket = new IO::Socket::INET (
    LocalHost => '127.0.0.1',
    LocalPort => '1055',
    Proto => 'tcp',
    Listen => 1,
    Reuse => 1
) or die "Oops: $! \n";

print "$$: waiting for clients.\n";
server_loop();
$socket->close();

sub server_loop
{
OUTER:
    while (my $clientsocket = $socket->accept())
    {
        print "$$: connected from : ", $clientsocket->peerhost();
        print ", port : ", $clientsocket->peerport(), "\n";

INNER:
        while (<$clientsocket>)
        {
            print"$$: Message received from Client : $_";
            last INNER if ($_ eq "\$END\$\n");
            last OUTER if ($_ eq "\$QUIT\$\n");
            print $clientsocket $_;
        }

        my $login_ack = "login_ack.txt";
        open LOGINACK, '<', $login_ack or die "Cannot open login acknowledgment file $login_ack ($!)\n";
        my @loginack = <LOGINACK>;
        close LOGINACK;

        my $logfile = "logfile.txt";
        open LOG, ">>", $logfile or die "$$: cannot open $logfile ($!)\n";

        foreach my $loginack (@loginack)
        {
            last if ($loginack eq "\$END\$\n");
            print $clientsocket $loginack;
            print LOG "$$: $loginack";
            print "$$: server to client: $loginack";
        }

        close LOG;
        close $clientsocket;
    }
}

clientJ.pl

#!/usr/bin/env perl
use strict;
use warnings;
use IO::Socket::INET;

my $socket = new IO::Socket::INET (
    PeerHost => '127.0.0.1',
    PeerPort => '1055',
    Proto    => 'tcp',
    Reuse    => 1
) or die "$!\n";

print "$$: connected to the server.\n";

send_login();
abc();
$socket->close();

sub send_login
{
    my $login_txt = "Login.txt";
    open LOGIN, '<', $login_txt or die "Cannot open $login_txt $!\n";
    my @login = <LOGIN>;
    close LOGIN;

    my $logfile = "logfile.txt";
    open LOG, '>>', $logfile or die "Cannot open $logfile ($!)\n";

    foreach my $login (@login)
    {
        print $socket $login;
        print LOG "$$: $login";
        print "$$: sent to server: $login";
        last if ($login eq "\$END\$\n");
    }
    close LOG;
}

sub abc
{
    while (<$socket>)
    {
        print"$$: Message received from Server: $_";
    }
}

clientQ.pl

#!/usr/bin/env perl
use strict;
use warnings;
use IO::Socket::INET;

my $socket = new IO::Socket::INET(
  PeerHost => '127.0.0.1',
  PeerPort => '1055',
  Proto    => 'tcp',
  Reuse    => 1
) or die "$!\n";

print $socket "\$QUIT\$\n";

$socket->close();

Sample log

$ perl serverJ.pl 2>&1 &
[1] 87610
$ 87610: waiting for clients.

$ perl clientJ.pl | so
87610: connected from : 127.0.0.1, port : 57143
87610: Message received from Client : SAS4
87610: Message received from Client : 50
87610: Message received from Client : SAS_ACTION LOGIN
87610: Message received from Client : LOGIN bss
87610: Message received from Client : PASSWORD cleint
87610: Message received from Client : $END$
87610: server to client: SAS4
87610: server to client: 61
87610: server to client: SAS_ACTION LOGIN_ACK
87610: server to client: ACK_STATUS 0
87610: server to client: ACK_MESSAGE Logged In
87614: connected to the server.
87614: sent to server: SAS4
87614: sent to server: 50
87614: sent to server: SAS_ACTION LOGIN
87614: sent to server: LOGIN bss
87614: sent to server: PASSWORD cleint
87614: sent to server: $END$
87614: Message received from Server: SAS4
87614: Message received from Server: 50
87614: Message received from Server: SAS_ACTION LOGIN
87614: Message received from Server: LOGIN bss
87614: Message received from Server: PASSWORD cleint
87614: Message received from Server: SAS4
87614: Message received from Server: 61
87614: Message received from Server: SAS_ACTION LOGIN_ACK
87614: Message received from Server: ACK_STATUS 0
87614: Message received from Server: ACK_MESSAGE Logged In
$ perl clientJ.pl | so
87610: connected from : 127.0.0.1, port : 57144
87610: Message received from Client : SAS4
87610: Message received from Client : 50
87610: Message received from Client : SAS_ACTION LOGIN
87610: Message received from Client : LOGIN bss
87610: Message received from Client : PASSWORD cleint
87610: Message received from Client : $END$
87610: server to client: SAS4
87610: server to client: 61
87610: server to client: SAS_ACTION LOGIN_ACK
87610: server to client: ACK_STATUS 0
87610: server to client: ACK_MESSAGE Logged In
87617: connected to the server.
87617: sent to server: SAS4
87617: sent to server: 50
87617: sent to server: SAS_ACTION LOGIN
87617: sent to server: LOGIN bss
87617: sent to server: PASSWORD cleint
87617: sent to server: $END$
87617: Message received from Server: SAS4
87617: Message received from Server: 50
87617: Message received from Server: SAS_ACTION LOGIN
87617: Message received from Server: LOGIN bss
87617: Message received from Server: PASSWORD cleint
87617: Message received from Server: SAS4
87617: Message received from Server: 61
87617: Message received from Server: SAS_ACTION LOGIN_ACK
87617: Message received from Server: ACK_STATUS 0
87617: Message received from Server: ACK_MESSAGE Logged In
$ perl clientQ.pl | so
87610: connected from : 127.0.0.1, port : 57147
87610: Message received from Client : $QUIT$
[1]+  Done                    perl serverJ.pl 2>&1
$ 

Post loop code executes

In the server script, while sending the acknowledgement, the code after the foreach my $loginack (@loginack) loop does not get executed. I think that is because the code cannot break out of the loop. How shall it be dealt with?

Mildly modified code in serverJ.pl:

        foreach my $loginack (@loginack)
        {
            last if ($loginack eq "\$END\$\n");
            print $clientsocket $loginack;
            print LOG "$$: $loginack";
            print "$$: server to client: $loginack";
        }

        print "$$: End of Loop\n";
        close LOG;
        close $clientsocket;
        print "$$: After close\n";

Example run:

$ perl serverJ.pl &
[1] 6913
$ 6913: waiting for clients.

$ perl clientJ.pl
6915: connected to the server.
6913: connected from : 127.0.0.1, port : 52454
6915: sent to server: This is the file Login.txt
6913: Message received from Client : This is the file Login.txt
6915: sent to server: It contains more than 1 line
6915: sent to server: It also contains this one
6915: sent to server: $END$
6913: Message received from Client : It contains more than 1 line
6913: Message received from Client : It also contains this one
6913: Message received from Client : $END$
6915: Message received from Server: This is the file Login.txt
6915: Message received from Server: It contains more than 1 line
6915: Message received from Server: It also contains this one
6913: server to client: This is the file login_ack.txt
6913: server to client: As with the other file, it contains multiple lines
6913: server to client: Several of them.
6913: server to client: This is one of them.
6915: Message received from Server: This is the file login_ack.txt
6913: End of Loop
6915: Message received from Server: As with the other file, it contains multiple lines
6915: Message received from Server: Several of them.
6915: Message received from Server: This is one of them.
6913: After close
$ perl clientQ.pl
6913: connected from : 127.0.0.1, port : 52455
6913: Message received from Client : $QUIT$
[1]+  Done                    perl serverJ.pl
$

Original Edition of Answer

This code seems to work for me (for a loose definition of 'works'). It is closely based on your code, but using socket 1055 instead of 0155 (I run on Unix; I'd have to be root to use a port number less than 1024), and with use strict; and use warnings; and other minor cleanups.

server.pl

#!/usr/bin/env perl
use strict;
use warnings;
use IO::Socket::INET;

my $socket = new IO::Socket::INET( LocalHost => '127.0.0.1', LocalPort => '1055', Proto => 'tcp', Listen => 1, Reuse => 1 ) or die "Oops: $! \n";

print "Waiting for the Client.\n";

my $clientsocket;

while ($clientsocket = $socket->accept())
{
    print   "Connected from : ", $clientsocket->peerhost();
    print   ", Port : ", $clientsocket->peerport(), "\n";

    while (<$clientsocket>)
    {
        if ($_ ne "\$END\$\n")
        {
            print"Message received from Client : $_";
            print $clientsocket $_;
        }
        else
        {
            print"\$END\$\n";  
        }   
    }
    last;
}

login_ack();

sub login_ack
{
    # Some code removed for the purpose of posting                          
    open (LOGINACK, "login_ack.txt") || die "Cannot open login acknowledgment file $!\n";
    my @loginack=<LOGINACK>;
    close LOGINACK;                         
    open(LOG, ">>logfile.txt");

    foreach my $loginack (@loginack)
    {
        if ($loginack ne "\$END\$\n")
        {
            print $clientsocket $loginack;
            print LOG $loginack;
            print $loginack;
        }
        else
        {
            print"\$END\$\n";   
        }
    }
}

client.pl

#!/usr/bin/env perl
use strict;
use warnings;
use IO::Socket::INET;

my $socket = new IO::Socket::INET ( PeerHost => '127.0.0.1', PeerPort => '1055', Proto => 'tcp', Reuse => 1) or die "$!\n";

print "Connected to the Server.\n";

send_login();

sub send_login
{
# Some code removed for the purpose of posting                              
    open (LOGIN, "Login.txt") || die "Cannot open login file $!\n";
    my @login=<LOGIN>;
    close LOGIN;                            
    open(LOG, ">>logfile.txt");

    foreach my $login (@login)
    {
        if ($login ne "\$END\$\n")
        {
            print $socket $login;
            print LOG $login;
            print $login;
        }
        else
        {
            print"\$END\$\n"; 
        }
    }
} 

LOGINACK:
while (<$socket>)
{
    print"Message received from Server : $_";
    print $socket $_; 
    last LOGINACK;
}

Login.txt

This is the content of the Login.txt file.
$END$

login_ack.txt

This is the contents of the login_ack.txt file.
It has two lines of text plus the $END$ line.
$END$

Sample output

$ perl server.pl &
[1] 74838
$ Waiting for the Client.

$ perl client.pl | so
Connected from : 127.0.0.1, Port : 51109
Message received from Client : This is the content of the Login.txt file.
Message received from Client : This is the content of the Login.txt file.
Connected to the Server.
This is the content of the Login.txt file.
$END$
Message received from Server : This is the content of the Login.txt file.
This is the contents of the login_ack.txt file.
It has two lines of text plus the $END$ line.
$END$
[1]+  Done                    perl server.pl
$ 

The server terminates after responding to a single request.

share|improve this answer
    
Hey Jon, thanks for having a look at the code, but your variant of th code yields the exact same output as the one ive put up. Like 100pc. Also, regarding the use strict, use warnings, i used it in the actual code, for the purpose of posting it here, the SSCCE thing you taught me, i removed it. –  Sahej Narang Apr 16 '13 at 0:05
    
An SSCCE is complete; the use statements are part of the completeness. People are apt to comment on the absence of use strict and use warnings so it is best to include them to head off trouble. The shebang line is perhaps optional; I'd include it — as shown. –  Jonathan Leffler Apr 16 '13 at 4:48
    
Thank You Jonanthan! –  Sahej Narang Apr 18 '13 at 6:18
1  
I've tested a modified version of the serverJ.pl script and the loop terminates fine. See trace information in edited answer. –  Jonathan Leffler Apr 22 '13 at 15:16
1  
I don't know what you're doing, but the code is working fine for me. If you are expecting serverJ.pl to be a single-cycle program (so it exits after the first client), then you need to re-read the notes I provided (see point 1 in the revised answer), and use the clientQ.pl to make it terminate. Or modify the code so it stops after the first response, but that makes it a pointless server. –  Jonathan Leffler Apr 23 '13 at 6:53
show 9 more comments

accept is used to accept a connection from a listening (server) socket. Client sockets are connected by connect, which is called for you by new.

So,

while (my $serversocket = $socket->accept()) {
   print "\nThe line after the while loop is printing\n\n";
   while (<$serversocket>) {
      print "Message received from Server : $_";
      print $serversocket $_;
   }
}

should be

while (<$socket>) {
   print "Message received from Server : $_";
}

The output of the client is now

Connected to the Server.
SAS4
50
SAS_ACTION LOGIN
LOGIN bss
PASSWORD cleint
$END$

The line before the while loop is printing.

Message received from Server : SAS4
Message received from Server : 50
Message received from Server : SAS_ACTION LOGIN
Message received from Server : LOGIN bss
Message received from Server : PASSWORD cleint
Message received from Server : $END$

Then it waits for more input from the server. The server never calls login_ack, since it's waiting for more input from the client. When do you want to call login_ack?

share|improve this answer
    
the code is still not yielding the correct output. 1. In the client, the cmd reads out : Message from the Server : {The file that the is client is reading(Login)}. 2. In the server, the cmd reads out : Message from client : {The file that the client is reading(Login)} --> This is correct but contradicts (point 1). 3. The code in the client is running over and over again in a loop. –  Sahej Narang Apr 9 '13 at 14:46
    
My Contradiction: we are not outputting the correct thing in Client. Instead of outputting the i/p from the Server, we are outputting the i/p from the client itself. Pls have a look. TY –  Sahej Narang Apr 9 '13 at 14:48
    
See update to my answer. –  ikegami Apr 9 '13 at 15:35
    
It needs to be called as soon as we receive "$END$" from the client. –  Sahej Narang Apr 9 '13 at 15:41
1  
There's no such if. And you should most definitely not post addition code! (Since I've updated it) what's posted is minimal runnable code to demonstrate the problem. That's exactly what should be posted. Like I just said, the only thing missing is a check to see if $_ contains "$END$\n" Are you saying you do not know how to check what a variable contains? –  ikegami Apr 9 '13 at 15:48
show 12 more comments

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