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I've written a few very casual wrappers around REST and less structured web interfaces, but all just for fun, with very little attention to error detection and handling, timeouts, etc.

Can somebody please give me some pointers, either on practices, or to resources, for developing a solid, professional .NET (or other platform) wrapper for a REST API?

Things that cross my mind are:

  1. Interpreting HTTP error codes and filtering protocol errors from API errors.
  2. Building URL based requests, possibly with pattern matching and token substitution.
  3. Matching post-backs to requests.
  4. How to map an OO model to the REST model. Some requests suit static methods, e.g. getting lists, and others hang in the middle between static and instance, maybe a plain provider pattern with all static methods?

NEW: I've since found this almost too basic guide to making Yahoo REST calls, but it serves as a starting point.

IMPORTANT: A very complex and seldom covered aspect is how to deal with forms authentication on the REST API. Separate login requests, cookie storage, etc.

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Very good question. I just wanted to ask a very similar one. What if you make this question language-agnostic? –  markus Oct 19 '09 at 15:26
    
I just did, except for a mention of my .NET preference. Good idea. –  ProfK Oct 19 '09 at 15:30
    
ok, great! I added the language-agnostic tag in order to attract more readers (hopefully). I think it's fine to have the .net tag and the agnostic tag both. I just means it's a general question with a little twist towards your .net case. Hope that's ok for you. –  markus Oct 19 '09 at 15:37
    
I'm not sure this is language agnostic to be honest (or perhaps more precisely I don't think it's framework agnostic). Different frameworks have very different design guidelines - i.e. a wrapper for use by something like Python would be very different to one for use by C#/VB. –  Greg Beech Oct 19 '09 at 15:39
2  
It isn't that simple - it uses forms authentication, and what would you do, the whole HttpWebRequest rigmarole for every operation? –  ProfK Oct 20 '09 at 16:47

1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Although I have wrapped countless web services in an OOP-ish way, I find it difficult to come up with a good answer to your question.

A couple of Yahoo API examples can be found here: http://curlobjects.com/trac/browser/trunk/lib/YahooApi

1 Interpreting HTTP error codes and filtering protocol errors from API errors.

My base http class has an http error callback that can be overriden.

2 Building URL based requests, possibly with pattern matching and token substitution.

I prefer string concatenation.

4 How to map an OO model to the REST model. Some requests suit static methods, e.g. getting lists, and others hang in the middle between static and instance, maybe a plain provider pattern with all static methods?

Sometime you need one big static factory/provider, sometimes you want a class for each method, sometimes a class for each group of related methods... There really isn't one proper way to go about this. I always spend some time getting a feel of the service's structure and then try to find an elegant way to abstract the repetitive parts.

If you have any more specific questions regarding login forms, cookies, etc, I'd be glad to answer them.

Edit:

HttpWebRequest was mentioned and I'm guessing you either need to set the ClientCertificate property and use SSL properly, or you can ignore all SLL errors with a CertificatePolicy.

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Please try. When I execute an example API GET request, I get a login form HTML as my response body, and this submits to an HTTPS address. If I change that to a dummy HTTP address, the form submits properly. What do I need to do about the HTTPS login request? I think I'll get my 'golden cookie' after that. –  ProfK Oct 20 '09 at 17:31
    
What are you using for sending out your HTTP requests? You probably need to set some extra options to handle HTTPS. –  bhseo Oct 21 '09 at 4:48

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