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I have a program I am working on that will start and stop a servo. I can issue the following command from the command line and it works. echo 2=120 > /dev/servoblaster that will start the servo in motion. Now I have the following program

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main(void)
{
    FILE *fp;


   fp = fopen("/dev/servoblaster", "w");
   if (fp == NULL) {
       printf("Error opening file\n");
       exit(0); 
 }
   fprintf(fp, "2=120");
   fclose(fp);
   fflush(fp); 
   return 0;
}

But when I execute it nothing happens, now when I try the echo 2=120 > /dev/servoblaster command it will say Bad input: 2=1202=120 but if i repeat the same echo 2=120 > /dev/servoblaster command it will work again. If i was to try and execute my above program 3 times the output when I try to execute the echo command its output will be Bad input 2=1202=1202=120 2=120 so to me it seems like the file is not finished being written to in my program. Can someone point out if I am missing something?

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fflush(fp) can't be done after fclose(fp) because after closing the pointer is no longer valid. You should swap the two calls. –  Alexey Frunze Apr 9 '13 at 1:48

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You need to add a newline after the command, like echo does:

fprintf(fp, "2=120\n");

Presumably, the servo's driver waits until it sees a newline before acting on a command.

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the program has no problem, I run the following code

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main(void)
{
    FILE *fp;
    fp = fopen("/home/syler/servoblaster", "w");
    if (fp == NULL) {
        printf("Error opening file\n");
        exit(0); 
    }   
    fprintf(fp, "2=120");
    fclose(fp);
    fflush(fp); 
    return 0;
}

the result is

cat /home/syler/servoblaster
2=120 

so, there must be the "servoblaster" kernel driver module problem.

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He ain't using fwrite. –  nneonneo Apr 9 '13 at 1:39
    
Thanks nneonneo, I modify the answer. –  syler Apr 9 '13 at 1:51

This is an old thread, but I just ran into the same problem so am posting what I know. From what I'm seeing, the "\n" is needed, however that screws up the buffer for the next time (i.e. it puts a "\n" into the buffer so your next write appears to be bad data even if it's good data). My current work around is to put a "\n" before and after the string. This ensures it works every time, but I always get a "Bad Data" message due to the "\n". Still searching for the correct way to do this but haven't yet found a call from C to get this code working.

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