Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm new to Java world, so bear with me if it is dumb question.

I recently saw some code like this in run() method of an Runnable object.

try {
    if (Thread.interrupted()) {
       throw new InterruptedException();
    }

    // do something 

    if (Thread.interrupted()) {
        throw new InterruptedException();
    }

    // do something 

    if (Thread.interrupted()) {
        throw new InterruptedException();
    }

    // and so on

} catch (InterruptedException e){
     // Handle exception
} finally {
     // release resource
}

How often, and where should you check thread interruption, what is a good practice for it?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

it's not generally something that you just sprinkle throughout your code. however, if you are expecting to be able to cancel an asynchronous task, it may be necessary to periodically check for interruption. in other words, it's typically something you would add after the fact when you identify a body of code which needs to be more responsive to interruption.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks, Can user hit a key, or mouse click interruption be counted? i just think of other case: we can put it before a long-taking execution, so if the interruption come before thread enter that part, we can terminate the thread without wasting our cpu or memory to do something that no longer valid. –  jAckOdE Apr 9 '13 at 5:00
    
@jAckOdE - interruption is something that happens when some code calls thread.interrupt(). –  jtahlborn Apr 9 '13 at 12:11

I usually don't see the thread interrupt mechanism being used - likewise, if your code isn't interrupting threads, then the threads don't need to check to see if they've been interrupted. If however your program is using the thread interrupt mechanism, then a good place to put the if(Thread.interrupted()) check is at the top-level loop in your Runnable: a Runnable will often look like

run() {
    while(true) {
        ...
    }
}

Yours would instead look like

run() {
    try {
        while(true) {
            if(Thread.interrupted()) {
                throw new InterruptedException();
            }
            ...
         }
    } catch (InterruptedException ex) {
        ...
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, for run() method that contain an infinite loop, i think this is probably the standard pattern. –  jAckOdE Apr 9 '13 at 4:54

A thread is only interrupted when someone calls its interrupt() method. If you never call interrupt(), and you're not working with a library that calls interrupt() (and that's something you'd expect would be spelled out), then you don't need to be checking for interruptions.

The main reason that someone would want to interrupt a thread is to cancel a blocking or long-running task. For example, the locking mechanism wait() normally causes the thread to wait forever for notification, but another thread can interrupt to force the waiting thread to stop waiting (usually this would be to cancel the operation).

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.