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Please bear with me and let me explain. Say I work for a vehicle insurance company and we are trying to develop an online portal which our customers can purchase insurance policies. Let's just say we offer 3 insurance products Car Insurance (CI), Motorcycle Insurance (MI) and Truck Insurance (TI). And I shall say that 90% of these products are similar in terms of how we implement them but they differ significantly in the remaining 10%.

Let me use C# as an example to demonstrate (below code is a rough idea to demonstrate my problem not real code).

public class CarInsurancePolicy
{
    //common properties among all 3 insurance products
    public decimal MadeYear {get;set}
    public decimal PurcahsePrice {get;set}

    //specific to this particular product
    public bool HasCentralLocking {get;set}
    public DateTime SpecialDateToDoWithCar {get;set}
}

public class MotorcycleInsurancePolicy
{
    //common properties among all 3 insurance products
    public decimal MadeYear {get;set}
    public decimal PurcahsePrice {get;set}

    //specific to this particular product
    public int EngineStroke {get;set}
    public DateTime SpecialDateToDoWithMotorcycle {get;set}
}

public class TruckInsurancePolicy
{
    //common properties among all 3 insurance products
    public decimal MadeYear {get;set}
    public decimal PurcahsePrice {get;set}

    //specific to this particular product
    public decimal LoadCapacityInTons {get;set}
    public DateTime SpecialDateToDoWithTruck {get;set}
}

As you can see for each of the policy class they have properties that are mostly the same but quite different from each type. And now comes to the database part.

I don't know if I should do this

CREATE TABLE BaseInsurancePolicy
(
  //all common columns
)

CREATE TABLE CarInsurancePolicy
(
  //specific to this type of product
)

CREATE TABLE MotorcycleInsurancePolicy
(
  //specific to this type of product
)

CREATE TABLE TruckInsurancePolicy
(
  //specific to this type of product
)

OR should I do this

CREATE TABLE GiantInsurancePolicyTable
(
  //all columns and everything is NULLABLE
)

And now comes to the workflow part

We have a few basic common steps to rate any type of product. Say we take into account of the made year, KM travelled etc to form a basic rating and then depending on specific type of product and we have special way to calculate the premium.

public class RatingEngingForCar
{
   //can be common step
   public decimal GetPremium() {}

   //specific for car
   private void ApplyA() {}
   private void ApplyC() {}
}

public class RatingEngingForMotorcycle
{
   //can be common step
   public decimal GetPremium() {}

   //specific for motorcycle
   private void ApplyE() {}
   private void ApplyF() {}
}

public class RatingEngingForTruck
{
   //can be common step
   public decimal GetPremium() {}

   //specific for motorcycle
   private void ApplyX() {}
   private void ApplyZ() {}
}

Then we have workflows which again 90% are similar but 10% differ quite significantly. Then again it'll be the same for generating insurance policy (the actual policy doc) and then invoices.

So what I don't know if whether I should come up with some kind of a generic but yet flexible way to form a base classes and start inheriting and modifying to specific behaviour for each product. OR should I just copy past from the 1st product and modify for the 2,3,4,5 products?

In terms of UI, I am trying to componentize our javascript so that in general as long as the html structure is the same and the id/name/class then the functionality will be provided *automatically by including and initiating the JS. but the trouble is I will need to duplicate HTML everywhere for every products.

I don't know if I've explained my problem clear enough from a very high level. If not I will update / clarify based on comments. Thank you very much.

share|improve this question

closed as primarily opinion-based by Jeff, John Saunders, rene, gunr2171, Squidward Apr 13 '14 at 19:02

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Just follow your heart: "Don't repeat yourself". :) – david van brink Apr 9 '13 at 4:45
    
I don't have any idea at this moment. I kind of want to have a base class for everything but then I don't know if the complexity justifies the flexibility. Then I want to copy paste but then I feel it's obviously WRONG! – Jeff Apr 9 '13 at 4:47
    
3NF, Interface-Based Design with DI, SOLID and GRASP principle. Just advising, I am interested in this kind of discussion. – Fendy Apr 9 '13 at 4:52
    
Not just the backend as well as the front end. Like HTML, Javascript, CSS, it's a bit like white labelling but not really I guess. This is new to me too. We yet to figure out a way we like so far. I also had a look at en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Data,_Context,_and_Interaction but not fully understanding how we might benefit from it yet. – Jeff Apr 9 '13 at 4:53
    
I hope I've explained clearly enough in my question. – Jeff Apr 9 '13 at 4:54

On the code side, this is exactly the problem that object orientation is there to solve. Put the common functionality in a base class and derive more specialised classes from that.

You can do a similar thing in the database. For example, have a policy table with a column for each of the common properties plus an ID. You can then have specialist tables containing the other fields (e.g. one table for car insurance) with a column that's a foreign key reference into your base table.

You could easily add a view to the database that presents these all as if they were one giant table, so you haven't lost anything by structuring it nicely.

share|improve this answer

Trying to answer. I too, myself are still learning and any of my statement can sometimes be either good or bad in practice.

First thing to say, don't matter the front end (UI) too much. Doesn't mean it must be ignored, but it should not that as matter as the back end. Any view engine can be easily developed and many components like telerik and devexpress can be used to improve your UI. As I have stated in the comment, sometimes your front end can be changed, maybe to mobile, native app, etc. The change of UI can make your planning effort go waste if you consider front end too much at the beginning.

Next, choose where your business logic will be placed on to. It can be either in database (sprocs) or in application. I suggest to place the business logic in application since it can be easily manipulated (inheritance, polymorphism) than hundreds of sprocs.

During designing your application, use the approach of designing with interfaces first. The benefit of designing with interface will provide you with less coupling and more cohesion, and each of the component can be easily mocked later on. Keep on the GRASP and SOLID principle during the design.

You can use any application structures as you want, but as far as I experienced, the most modular and highest maintainability is using Dependency Injection with Service->Repository pattern. About how you maintain your DI (container, etc) is up to you.

For the database, I suggest to maintain it in 3NF, rather than in big tables. The reason, it support better insert/update for transactional operation, and you won't need big table unless you perform intensive query like reporting. Don't miss about auditing and logging, which I not yet good at it now.

Then map your database to application using any ORM you see fit.

In the end, you can append your backend application into WCF services, so then your front end will only need to call the services to interact with your backend. Don't forget about the security too.

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