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I cannot put my finger on why my program hangs and crashes when I pass my 2d-array, declared on the heap, between functions which accept double pointers.

I am getting a strong feeling that it has to do with the method I have chosen to declare the 2d array. Before I created a function to allocate the array, the program could manipulate the data inside the array when passed to a function.

So here is the allocate function and then the function which it crashes inside:

void matrix_malloc(int **matrix, int m, int n);
void matrix_init(int **matrix, int m, int n);

int main(void)
{
  int **matrix;
  int m(3), n(2);

  matrix_malloc(matrix, m, n);
  matrix_init(matrix, m, n); // runtime error
}

void matrix_malloc(int **matrix, int m, int n)
{ // get heap memory
  int i;
  matrix = new int*[m];
  for(i = 0; i < m; i++)
  {
    matrix[i] = new int[n];
  }
}

void matrix_init(int **matrix, int m, int n)
{ // randomize matrix
  int i, j;
  for(i = 0; i < m; i++)
  {
    for(j = 0; j < n; j++)
    {
      matrix[i][j] = rand() % 10 + 1;
    }
  }
}
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Try passing your matrix pointer to matrix_malloc by reference (int **& matrix) –  WhozCraig Apr 9 '13 at 6:35

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You have to pass your matrix pointer by reference.

void matrix_malloc(int **matrix, int m, int n)

This accepts a copy of matrix. Which means anything you do in matrix_malloc on matrix will not affect the one in main.

Instead it should be

void matrix_malloc(int **& matrix, int m, int n)
                        ^^^

However I suggest you use vectors instead of raw pointers and allocation. That way you don't need to wory about allocation and deallocation.

void matrix_malloc(vector<vector<int> >& matrix, int m, int n);

// You don't need this anymore.
// void matrix_init(int **matrix, int m, int n);

int main(void)
{
  vector<vector<int> > matrix;
  int m(3), n(2);

  // matrix_malloc(matrix, m, n);

  matrix_init(matrix, m, n); 
}


void matrix_init(vector<vector<int> >& matrix, int m, int n)
{ // randomize matrix
  int i, j;
  for(i = 0; i < m; i++)
  {
    vector<int> row;
    for(j = 0; j < n; j++)
    {
      row.push_back(rand() % 10 + 1);
      // matrix[i][j] = rand() % 10 + 1;
    }
    matrix.push_back(row);
  }
}
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Thank you for the example of vector usage, I need to learn how to use this. –  Leonardo Apr 9 '13 at 6:47
    
@Leonardo Yes. Definitely. It makes life a whole lot easier :) –  user995502 Apr 9 '13 at 6:49
void matrix_malloc(int **&matrix, int m, int n);
void matrix_init(int **matrix, int m, int n);

void matrix_malloc(int **&matrix, int m, int n)
{ // get heap memory
  int i;
  matrix = new int*[m];
  for(i = 0; i < m; i++)
  {
    matrix[i] = new int[n];
  }
}

And should work well. Problem, since after this

matrix = new int*[m];

matrix has new address, but since it's local copy of pointer - main doesn't know about it.

share|improve this answer
    
+1, or just to go full-C, a triple-indirect pointer (egads). –  WhozCraig Apr 9 '13 at 6:36
    
How would you do this, change the & to another *? –  Leonardo Apr 9 '13 at 6:37

matrix_malloc() needs to take the pointer by reference:

void matrix_malloc(int **&matrix, int m, int n)
                         ^

Without this, the newly-allocated pointer isn't getting propagated back to the caller.

That said, it may be more explicit to return the newly-allocated pointer from the function:

int** matrix_malloc(int m, int n)

Finally, is there a reason you are not using std::vector for this?

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I have not studied how to use this vector yet, I will see about that finally and why it would be a good situation for it. –  Leonardo Apr 9 '13 at 6:35

The allocation of your 2D array is fine. BUT.

  int **matrix;
  int m(3), n(2);

  matrix_malloc(matrix, m, n);

Here, matrix is not going to change - you are copying its value to pass it to the function. What I mean is:

  int **matrix = NULL; // matrix points to null
  int m(3), n(2);

  matrix_malloc(matrix, m, n); // copy the value contained in matrix and give it to the function
  //matrix still points to null

You have multiple solutions :

  • your matrix malloc can return an int**, and you would simply have to write matrix = matrix_malloc(m, n)
  • your matrix malloc could take a pointer to int** (int*** - handle carefully)
  • as mentionned in the other answers, a reference to int**

Here is what a matrix_malloc with an int*** would look like.

//call it as follows:
matrix_malloc(&matrix, m, n);


void matrix_malloc(int ***matrix, int m, int n)
{
  // matrix contains the address of the original variable, so *matrix is the original variable itself.
  int i;
  *matrix = new int*[m];
  for(i = 0; i < m; i++)
  {
    (*matrix)[i] = new int[n];
  }
}
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This is interesting, but you see if I had a pointer to a double pointer and pass by address, it will not work. –  Leonardo Apr 9 '13 at 6:45
    
You would have to modify your matrix_malloc accordingly of course. I'll edit my answer to illustrate. –  Nbr44 Apr 9 '13 at 6:50
    
Ahh I did not realize I needed to force precedence for the dereference operator, this is why it did not work. This is good to know. Also, it seems like a bad idea to use this method because what if I wanted to again pass by pointer to a function inside that one? Or would that be unlikely as it is a pointer and can copy the address instead. –  Leonardo Apr 9 '13 at 6:57
    
It will always depend whether you want to modify the pointed data (anything involving [] or *, in that case you can just copy the pointer itself (int**)) or where the pointer is, well, pointing (if there's no [] or * - if you want the modification to be carried over,you'll need to pass the address of the pointer (int***)). Whether or not this method is good is another debate - but in C++ you have plenty of tools to avoid that kind of headache. –  Nbr44 Apr 9 '13 at 7:01

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