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I have a certain calculated field that I regularly want to return in the "select" fields of a Linq query, e.g. Customer order total this year, along with other demographic info of the Customer.

public class Customer {
  public decimal TotalPurchasesThisYear(MyDataContext db) {
    return db.Orders.Where(o => o.CustomerID == ID)
                    .Sum(o => o.OrderTotalAmt);
  }
}

public class SomeReport {
  public void GetCustomerInfoBySalesperson(long salespersonID) {
    using (var db = new MyDataContext()) {
      var q = db.Customers.Where(c => c.SalespersonID == salespersonID)
                          .Select(c => new { c.Name, c.Address, ThisYearPurchases = c.TotalPurchasesThisYear(db) })
                          .ToList();
      // etc..
    }
  }
}

Obviously, this doesn't work, because TotalPurchasesThisYear has no SQL translation. But everything inside it does have a SQL translation. I don't want to include that code directly in the query, because I'm doing the same calculation in lots of places. My gut tells me this should be done with an Expression but I've played around and can't quite work out the right syntax.

Help, anyone? Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
What I just comment in here is you are violating Persistance Ignorance: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/dd882510.aspx. Your model depends on persistent layer, you need to consider using Reposistory for example. –  Cuong Le Apr 9 '13 at 8:01
1  
@CuongLe - I'm not that fussed about tightly coupling Customer and Order; this is just a simple example of what I'm trying to do, anyway. I'm going after the principle of how to abstract a field in the Select clause. –  Shaul Behr Apr 9 '13 at 8:04
    
Tight coupling is an issue you can't ignore. The methods you show are typical repository or service methods. If it's not persistence ignorance then it is single responsibility you should worry about. The customer does not even seem to have an Orders collection so it has nothing to do with orders. When an approach causes trouble tackle it at the root. This is just something you should not do. It calls for a complex solution that is bound to introduce new problems. Just an advice ツ. –  Gert Arnold Apr 9 '13 at 8:46
    
@GertArnold - so what do you suggest as a solution, then? How would you approach this problem? –  Shaul Behr Apr 9 '13 at 8:47
    
Well, I'd use repository or service methods to provide the data you want. –  Gert Arnold Apr 9 '13 at 8:49

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

OK, I've found one way to do this, though I'm not sure it's the best way:

public class CustomerOrderInfo {
  public long CustomerID;
  public decimal TotalPurchases;
}

public class Customer {
  public static Expression<Func<Customer, CustomerOrderInfo>> GetCustomerOrderInfo() {
    return c => new CustomerOrderInfo {
                  CustomerID = c.ID,
                  TotalPurchases = c.Orders.Where(o => o.OrderDate.Year == DateTime.Now.Year)
                                    .Sum(o => o.OrderTotalAmt)
                };
  }
}

public class SomeReport {
  public void GetCustomerInfoBySalesperson(long salespersonID) {
    using (var db = new MyDataContext()) {
      var q = db.Customers
                .Join(db.Customers.Select(Customer.GetCustomerOrderInfo()),
                      c => c.ID, i => i.CustomerID,
                      (c, i) => new { c.Name, c.Address, i.TotalPurchases })
                .ToList();
  // etc..
    }
  }
}

It works... but the underlying SQL ends up with a join on a nested query, which isn't my ideal. I would want to see the underlying SQL be something simple, like:

select c.Name, c.Address, sum(o.OrderTotalAmt) TotalPurchases
from Customer c 
left join [Order] o on o.CustomerID = c.ID
where Year(o.OrderDate) = @year
group by c.Name, c.Address
share|improve this answer
List<Parent> myParents = new List<Parent>
                                         {
                                             new Parent() 
                                             {
                                                 Prop1 = "1", 
                                                 Prop2 = "2",
                                                 Prop3 = "3", 
                                                 Children = new List<Child>()
                                                        {
                                                            new Child(){ Prop1 = 1, Prop2 = 2, Prop3 = 3 },
                                                            new Child(){ Prop1 = 21, Prop2 = 22, Prop3 = 23 },
                                                            new Child(){ Prop1 = 31, Prop2 = 32, Prop3 = 33 }
                                                        }
                                             }, 
                                         };

            Expression<Func<Parent, int>> GetChildSum =
                p => p.Children.Where(c => c.Prop1 > 0).Sum(o => o.Prop2);

            var v = myParents.Where(w => w.Prop1 == "1").Select(p => GetChildSum.Compile().Invoke(p)).ToList();

            Console.WriteLine(v.First());

            //output is 56
share|improve this answer
    
Ya, well, that's exactly my situation: I do have tons of rows and I need the work to be done on the SQL side... –  Shaul Behr Apr 18 '13 at 14:28
    
Ok, What if you return the Sum from your expression instead of the CustomerOrderInfo. And then query the expression in the select statement similar as you did in the Question-post? –  Andreas Johansson Apr 18 '13 at 15:21
    
I don't follow your suggestion... can you edit your answer to show what that would look like? –  Shaul Behr Apr 21 '13 at 7:27
    
i did, the bottom part of my answer is the new suggestion. –  Andreas Johansson Apr 22 '13 at 5:50
    
I haven't tested that, but just visually scanning it, how would that work? GetCustomerOrderInfo is static, but you're calling it as if it's an instance method? –  Shaul Behr Apr 22 '13 at 8:08

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