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create table Mytable1
(ID int,
Fname varchar(50)
)

create table Mytable2
(ID int,
Lname varchar(50)
)

insert into Mytable1 (ID,Fname)
values (1,'you')
insert into Mytable1 (ID,Fname)
values (2,'Tou')
insert into Mytable1 (ID,Fname)
values (3,'Nou')

insert into Mytable2 (ID,Lname)
values (1,'you2')

The field Fname does not exist in table Mytable2 But we have a result for the following query :

select * from Mytable1 where Fname in (select Fname from Mytable2)

Note : I use sql server 2008 the result is all rows of table Mytable1

is it a bug in SQL ?

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2  
What RDBMS you are using? –  Mahmoud Gamal Apr 9 '13 at 8:54
    
The result would be coming as a blank row? –  Ajo Koshy Apr 9 '13 at 8:54
    
I can reproduce this in MySQL. That is spooky. –  mrks Apr 9 '13 at 8:56
    
I use sql servser 2008 the result is all rows of table Mytable1 –  Mazen Khoder Apr 9 '13 at 8:57
    
I think that puts the * content of MyTable1 to the Fname(you don't have primary key that so it makes it as a name of new array of MyTable2) and then show you the results as content of Fname of MyTable2 which contains the * of MyTable1. –  Mhche Apr 9 '13 at 8:57

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

No, it's not a bug.

You can see what's happening a bit clearer if you add table aliases to the fields used throughout the query:

select * from Mytable1 mt1 
where mt1.Fname in (select mt1.Fname from Mytable2 mt2)

- ie. the subquery is referencing (and returning) values from the main query.

If you change the query to:

select * from Mytable1 mt1 
where mt1.Fname in (select mt2.Fname from Mytable2 mt2)

- you get an error.

(SQLFiddle here)

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Thank you, but anyway i think this is a source of ambiguity. –  Mazen Khoder Apr 9 '13 at 12:50
    
@MazenKhoder: Without being able to refer to columns from the main query inside the subquery, correlated sub-queries are impossible. The only ambiquity comes from not including the name/alias of the table with the column name. –  Mark Bannister Apr 9 '13 at 13:00
    
so ,shouldn't the sql warn me about this ambiguity ? –  Mazen Khoder Apr 9 '13 at 13:19
    
@MazenKhoder: No - as far as the RDBMS is concerned, there is no ambiguity, since Fname only exists on Mytable1. –  Mark Bannister Apr 9 '13 at 13:23
    
No, if you add the field Fname to the table Mytable2 (so we have now the field Fname in the 2 tables) the sql don't give any ambiguity ? ! I think the engine firstly find the field in subquery if he didn't find it the sql try in the main query ? –  Mazen Khoder Apr 9 '13 at 13:39

No, this is not a bug: http://bugs.mysql.com/bug.php?id=26801

Apparently, this references Fname from Mytable1:

mysql> select *, (select Lname from Mytable1 limit 1) from Mytable2 where Lname in (select Lname from Mytable1 );
+------+-------+--------------------------------------+
| ID   | Lname | (select Lname from Mytable1 limit 1) |
+------+-------+--------------------------------------+
|    1 | you2  | you2                                 |
+------+-------+--------------------------------------+
1 row in set (0.01 sec)
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@MahmoudGamal - Doesn't matter. It also applies for SQL Server. –  Oded Apr 9 '13 at 9:03
    
Shouldn't matter as it seems to be an SQL standard thing. –  mrks Apr 9 '13 at 9:03
    
@MahmoudGamal modify your query as select * from Mytable1 AS t1 where t1.Fname in (select t2.Fname from Mytable2 AS t2) and it will give error –  Ajo Koshy Apr 9 '13 at 9:07
    
@MahmoudGamal - Well, that's the question the OP is asking. Why is there no error... –  Oded Apr 9 '13 at 9:07

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