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I have a FileExtractor class which a Start method which does some steps.

I've created a test class called "WhenExtractingInvalidFile.cs" within my folder called "FileExtractorTests" and added some Test Methods inside it as below which should be verified as steps of the Start() method:

[TestMethod]
public void Should_remove_original_file()
{

}

[TestMethod]
public void Should_add_original_file_to_errorStorage()
{

}

[TestMethod]
public void Should_log_error_locally()
{

}

This way, it'd nicely organize the behaviors and the expectations that should be met.

The problem is that most of the logic of these test methods are the same so should I be creating one test method that verifies all the steps or separately like above?

[TestMethod]
public void Should_remove_original_file_then_add_original_file_to_errorStorage_then_log_error_locally()
{      
}

What's the best practice?

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Does the production code only call the Start() method or does it call each step? – Ryan Gates Apr 10 '13 at 3:39
    
If You have to test multiple steps at once - wouldn't it be an integration test then? – Prokurors Jan 16 '15 at 15:44

While it's commonly accepted that the Act section of tests should only contain one call, there's still a lot of debate over the "One Assert per Test" practice.

I tend to adhere to it because :

  • when a test fails, I immediately know (from the test name) which of the multiple things we want to verify on the method under test went wrong.

  • tests that imply mocking are already harder to read than regular tests, they can easily get arcane when you're asserting against multiple mocks in the same test.

If you don't follow it, I'd at least recommend that you include meaningful Assert messages in order to minimize head scratching when a test fails.

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I would do the same thing you did, but with a _on_start postfix like this: Should_remove_original_file_on_start. The latter method will only give you a maximum of one assert fail, even though all aspects of Start could be broken.

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but most of the logic of the tests will be duplicated? some verifications/setups will be different (10%) but not the other but 90% of the code would be the same. I hoped I could create a separate template method and pass just arguments but not straight forward. – The Light Apr 9 '13 at 9:29
    
There's nothing wrong with having some helper methods in the test file. One other approach could be to separate the steps of Start into three methods that you could call from the test. They will need to be atomic/self contained for it to gain you much in regards of setup though. – AlexanderBrevig Apr 9 '13 at 9:36

DRY - don't repeat yourself.

Think about the scenario where your test fails. What would be most useful from a test organization point?

The second dimension to look at is maintenance. Do you want to run and maintain 1 test or n tests? Don't overburden development with writing many tests that have little value (I think TDD is a bit overrated for this reason). A test is more valuable if it exercises a larger path of the code rather than a short one.

In this particular scenario I would create a single test. If this test fails often and you are not reaching the root cause of the problem fast enough, re-factor into multiple tests.

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