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I want to use pprint for printing some complex lists, see the example below:

>>> x = [OrderedDict([(u'D-ID', u'clci-2'), (u'R', u'1691')]), OrderedDict([(u'D-ID', u'dallas-pcc-1'), (u'R', u'5498')]), OrderedDict([(u'D-ID', u'gx-1'), (u'R', u'2275')]), OrderedDict([(u'D-ID', u'gx-2'), (u'R', u'0')]), OrderedDict([(u'D-ID', u'ocs-1'), (u'R', u'31735')]), OrderedDict([(u'D-ID', u'ocs-2'), (u'R', u'0')]), OrderedDict([(u'D-ID', u'pcc-gx-1'), (u'R', u'46351')]), OrderedDict([(u'D-ID', u'rgx-1'), (u'R', u'907')]), OrderedDict([(u'D-ID', u'rgx-2'), (u'R', u'1010')]), OrderedDict([(u'D-ID', u'rocs-1'), (u'R', u'915')]), OrderedDict([(u'D-ID', u'rocs-2'), (u'R', u'1033')])]
>>> pprint.pprint(x)
[OrderedDict([(u'D-ID', u'clci-2'), (u'R', u'1691')]),
 OrderedDict([(u'D-ID', u'dallas-pcc-1'), (u'R', u'5498')]),
 OrderedDict([(u'D-ID', u'gx-1'), (u'R', u'2275')]),
 OrderedDict([(u'D-ID', u'gx-2'), (u'R', u'0')]),
 OrderedDict([(u'D-ID', u'ocs-1'), (u'R', u'31735')]),
 OrderedDict([(u'D-ID', u'ocs-2'), (u'R', u'0')]),
 OrderedDict([(u'D-ID', u'pcc-gx-1'), (u'R', u'46351')]),
 OrderedDict([(u'D-ID', u'rgx-1'), (u'R', u'907')]),
 OrderedDict([(u'D-ID', u'rgx-2'), (u'R', u'1010')]),
 OrderedDict([(u'D-ID', u'rocs-1'), (u'R', u'915')]),
 OrderedDict([(u'D-ID', u'rocs-2'), (u'R', u'1033')])]

This is fine, except that I want to remove all type name(OrderedDict & u) and all unnecessary []. Is it possible with pprint?

share|improve this question
    
Why do you need to do this? –  jamylak Apr 9 '13 at 11:06
    
@jamylak I just need to print data-structures such as above, and skipping types and [] is a great way of making the output smaller! –  theAlse Apr 9 '13 at 11:09
    
How about json.dumps? –  Boldewyn Apr 9 '13 at 11:25
    
@Boldewyn much better idea, submit it –  jamylak Apr 9 '13 at 11:29
    
@jamylak done :-) –  Boldewyn Apr 9 '13 at 12:53

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You'd need to create your own subclass of the pprint.PrettyPrinter class, and override the .format() method:

from pprint import PrettyPrinter, _recursion

class MyPrettyPrinter(PrettyPrinter):
    def format(self, object, context, maxlevels, level):
        if isinstance(object, OrderedDict):
            if not object:
                return "()", True, False

            objid = id(object)
            if maxlevels and level >= maxlevels:
                return "(...)", False, objid in context
            if objid in context:
                return _recursion(object), False, True
            context[objid] = 1
            readable = True
            recursive = False
            components = []
            append = components.append
            level += 1
            selfformat = self.format
            for k, v in sorted(object.items()):
                krepr, kreadable, krecur = selfformat(k, context, maxlevels, level)
                vrepr, vreadable, vrecur = selfformat(v, context, maxlevels, level)
                append('({}, {})'.format(krepr, vrepr))
                readable = readable and kreadable and vreadable
                if krecur or vrecur:
                    recursive = True
            del context[objid]
            return '({})'.format(', '.join(components)), readable, recursive

        formatted, readable, recursion = PrettyPrinter.format(self, object, context, maxlevels, level)
        if isinstance(object, unicode):
            formatted = formatted.lstrip('u')

        return formatted, readable, recursion

We let the base class do most of the work and only format the OrderedDict explicitly; it has a custom __repr__ which means that the original pprint implementation just uses that instead of recursing over it.

Then use this class instead of direct calls to pprint.pprint():

mypprint = MyPrettyPrinter()

mypprint.pprint(x)

This produces:

>>> mypprint = MyPrettyPrinter()
>>> mypprint.pprint(x)
[(('D-ID', 'clci-2'), ('R', '1691')),
 (('D-ID', 'dallas-pcc-1'), ('R', '5498')),
 (('D-ID', 'gx-1'), ('R', '2275')),
 (('D-ID', 'gx-2'), ('R', '0')),
 (('D-ID', 'ocs-1'), ('R', '31735')),
 (('D-ID', 'ocs-2'), ('R', '0')),
 (('D-ID', 'pcc-gx-1'), ('R', '46351')),
 (('D-ID', 'rgx-1'), ('R', '907')),
 (('D-ID', 'rgx-2'), ('R', '1010')),
 (('D-ID', 'rocs-1'), ('R', '915')),
 (('D-ID', 'rocs-2'), ('R', '1033'))]
share|improve this answer
    
I like the idea, but I don't think this'll pick up "internal" unicode strings, as shown by your output. –  DSM Apr 9 '13 at 11:41
    
@DSM: Urm, it didn't recurse. Curses, so we need to recurse ourselves, updating. –  Martijn Pieters Apr 9 '13 at 11:41
    
@DSM: Better; because of the custom __repr__ pprint would just use that instead of recursing over it. –  Martijn Pieters Apr 9 '13 at 11:57
>>> import pprint
>>> from collections import OrderedDict
>>> x = [OrderedDict([(u'D-ID', u'clci-2'), (u'R', u'1691')]), OrderedDict([(u'D-ID', u'dallas-pcc-1'), (u'R', u'5498')]), OrderedDict([(u'D-ID', u'gx-1'), (u'R', u'2275')]), OrderedDict([(u'D-ID', u'gx-2'), (u'R', u'0')]), OrderedDict([(u'D-ID', u'ocs-1'), (u'R', u'31735')]), OrderedDict([(u'D-ID', u'ocs-2'), (u'R', u'0')]), OrderedDict([(u'D-ID', u'pcc-gx-1'), (u'R', u'46351')]), OrderedDict([(u'D-ID', u'rgx-1'), (u'R', u'907')]), OrderedDict([(u'D-ID', u'rgx-2'), (u'R', u'1010')]), OrderedDict([(u'D-ID', u'rocs-1'), (u'R', u'915')]), OrderedDict([(u'D-ID', u'rocs-2'), (u'R', u'1033')])]
>>> print pprint.pformat(x).replace("OrderedDict([", "(") \
                           .replace("u'", "'") \
                           .replace("])", ")")

[(('D-ID', 'clci-2'), ('R', '1691')),
 (('D-ID', 'dallas-pcc-1'), ('R', '5498')),
 (('D-ID', 'gx-1'), ('R', '2275')),
 (('D-ID', 'gx-2'), ('R', '0')),
 (('D-ID', 'ocs-1'), ('R', '31735')),
 (('D-ID', 'ocs-2'), ('R', '0')),
 (('D-ID', 'pcc-gx-1'), ('R', '46351')),
 (('D-ID', 'rgx-1'), ('R', '907')),
 (('D-ID', 'rgx-2'), ('R', '1010')),
 (('D-ID', 'rocs-1'), ('R', '915')),
 (('D-ID', 'rocs-2'), ('R', '1033'))]

Adjust the replaces to your needs, I think this looks clean enough

share|improve this answer

If it's just for printing some dict and list stuff (or stuff from classes inheriting from them), you would be better off using some other serialization, e.g., JSON:

import json
print json.dumps(obj)
share|improve this answer
    
With indent=0 for new lines –  jamylak Apr 9 '13 at 13:13
    
I have used json.dumps for other dicts, the output is unfortunately uglier than pprint. –  theAlse Apr 9 '13 at 13:24

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