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I got this code to covert size in bytes via using PHP

PHP filesize MB/KB conversion

Now I wan't to covert via using Javascript , I tried to convert this code to JS so look like this..

function formatSizeUnits(bytes){
      if      (bytes>=1073741824) {bytes=(bytes/1073741824).toFixed(2)+' GB';}
      else if (bytes>=1048576)    {bytes=(bytes/1048576).toFixed(2)+' MB';}
      else if (bytes>=1024)       {bytes=(bytes/1024).toFixed(2)+' KB';}
      else if (bytes>1)           {bytes=bytes+' bytes';}
      else if (bytes==1)          {bytes=bytes+' byte';}
      else                        {bytes='0 byte';}
      return bytes;
}

Demo : http://jsbin.com/opufih/1/edit

This is a correctly way to do ? Or another better or easier ?

and this code has any wrong coding ? Thanks


Updated : (After the standardization)

function formatSizeUnits(bytes){
        if      (bytes>=1000000000) {bytes=(bytes/1000000000).toFixed(2)+' GB';}
        else if (bytes>=1000000)    {bytes=(bytes/1000000).toFixed(2)+' MB';}
        else if (bytes>=1000)       {bytes=(bytes/1000).toFixed(2)+' KB';}
        else if (bytes>1)           {bytes=bytes+' bytes';}
        else if (bytes==1)          {bytes=bytes+' byte';}
        else                        {bytes='0 byte';}
        return bytes;
}

Demo : http://jsbin.com/opufih/9/edit

share|improve this question
1  
This actually converts to GiB, MiB, and KiB. This is standard for file sizes, but not always for device sizes. – David Schwartz Apr 9 '13 at 11:40
    
@DavidSchwartz , Oh I think too .. Give me a resource to covert bytes to device sizes pls – l2aelba Apr 9 '13 at 11:53
up vote 171 down vote accepted

Try this

function bytesToSize(bytes) {
   var sizes = ['Bytes', 'KB', 'MB', 'GB', 'TB'];
   if (bytes == 0) return '0 Byte';
   var i = parseInt(Math.floor(Math.log(bytes) / Math.log(1024)));
   return Math.round(bytes / Math.pow(1024, i), 2) + ' ' + sizes[i];
};

Fixed : (as @disfated said)

1 kilo = 1000 (Decimal) (or change to 1024 for binary) + Precision parameter

function formatBytes(bytes,decimals) {
   if(bytes == 0) return '0 Byte';
   var k = 1000;
   var dm = decimals + 1 || 3;
   var sizes = ['Bytes', 'KB', 'MB', 'GB', 'TB', 'PB', 'EB', 'ZB', 'YB'];
   var i = Math.floor(Math.log(bytes) / Math.log(k));
   return (bytes / Math.pow(k, i)).toPrecision(dm) + ' ' + sizes[i];
}
share|improve this answer
    
works lovely, thanks – nimrod Sep 17 '13 at 6:49
7  
(1) why bytes = 0 is "n/a"? Isn't it just "0 B"? (2) Math.round doesn't have precision parameter. I'd better use (bytes / Math.pow(1024, i)).toPrecision(3) – disfated Sep 21 '13 at 15:50
    
Also, this should be accepted answer. Vote up! – disfated Sep 21 '13 at 15:52
2  
And yes, kilo is 1000, en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kilobyte – disfated Sep 21 '13 at 15:54
1  
toFixed(n) is probably more appropriate than toPrecision(n) to have a consistant precision for all the values. And to avoid trailing zeros (ex: bytesToSize(1000) // return "1.00 KB") we could use parseFloat(x). I suggest to replace the last line by: return parseFloat((bytes / Math.pow(k, i)).toFixed(2)) + ' ' + sizes[i];. With the previous change the results are: bytesToSize(1000) // return "1 KB" / bytesToSize(1100) // return "1.1 KB" / bytesToSize(1110) // return "1.11 KB / bytesToSize(1111) // also return "1.11 KB" – MathieuLescure Mar 25 '15 at 15:19

I am updating @Aliceljm answer here. Since the decimal place matters for 1,2 digit numbers, I am round off the first decimal place and keep the first decimal place. For 3 digit number, I am round off the units place and ignoring the all decimal places.

getMultiplers : function(bytes){
    var unit = 1000 ;
    if (bytes < unit) return bytes ;
    var exp = Math.floor(Math.log(bytes) / Math.log(unit));
    var pre = "kMGTPE".charAt(exp-1);
    var result = bytes / Math.pow(unit, exp);
    if(result/100 < 1)
        return (Math.round( result * 10 ) / 10) +pre;
    else
        return Math.round(result) + pre;
}
share|improve this answer

I originally used @Aliceljm's answer for a file upload project I was working on, but recently ran into an issue where a file was 0.98kb but being read as 1.02mb. Here's the updated code I'm now using.

function formatBytes(bytes){
  var kb = 1024;
  var ndx = Math.floor( Math.log(bytes) / Math.log(kb) );
  var fileSizeTypes = ["bytes", "kb", "mb", "gb", "tb", "pb", "eb", "zb", "yb"];

  return {
    size: +(bytes / kb / kb).toFixed(2),
    type: fileSizeTypes[ndx]
  };
}

The above would then be called after a file was added like so

// In this case `file.size` equals `26060275` 
formatBytes(file.size);
// returns `{ size: 24.85, type: "mb" }`

Granted, Windows reads the file as being 24.8mb but I'm fine with the extra precision.

share|improve this answer

Try this simple workaround.

var files = $("#file").get(0).files;               
                var size = files[0].size;
                if (size >= 5000000) {
alert("File size is greater than or equal to 5 MB");
}
share|improve this answer

According to Aliceljm's answer, I removed 0 after decimal:

function formatBytes(bytes, decimals) {
    if(bytes== 0)
    {
        return "0 Byte";
    }
    var k = 1024; //Or 1 kilo = 1000
    var sizes = ["Bytes", "KB", "MB", "GB", "TB", "PB"];
    var i = Math.floor(Math.log(bytes) / Math.log(k));
    return parseFloat((bytes / Math.pow(k, i)).toFixed(decimals)) + " " + sizes[i];
}
share|improve this answer

Actually you can use the filesizejs library.

share|improve this answer

There are 2 real ways to represent sizes when related to bytes, they are SI units (10^3) or IEC units (2^10). There is also JEDEC but their method is ambiguous and confusing. I noticed the other examples have errors such as using KB instead of kB to represent a kilobyte so I decided to write a function that will solve each of these cases using the range of currently accepted units of measure.

There is a formatting bit at the end that will make the number look a bit better (at least to my eye) feel free to remove that formatting if it doesn't suit your purpose.

Enjoy.

// pBytes: the size in bytes to be converted.
// pUnits: 'si'|'iec' si units means the order of magnitude is 10^3, iec uses 2^10

function prettyNumber(pBytes, pUnits) {
    // Handle some special cases
    if(pBytes == 0) return '0 Bytes';
    if(pBytes == 1) return '1 Byte';
    if(pBytes == -1) return '-1 Byte';

    var bytes = Math.abs(pBytes)
    if(pUnits && pUnits.toLowerCase() && pUnits.toLowerCase() == 'si') {
        // SI units use the Metric representation based on 10^3 as a order of magnitude
        var orderOfMagnitude = Math.pow(10, 3);
        var abbreviations = ['Bytes', 'kB', 'MB', 'GB', 'TB', 'PB', 'EB', 'ZB', 'YB'];
    } else {
        // IEC units use 2^10 as an order of magnitude
        var orderOfMagnitude = Math.pow(2, 10);
        var abbreviations = ['Bytes', 'KiB', 'MiB', 'GiB', 'TiB', 'PiB', 'EiB', 'ZiB', 'YiB'];
    }
    var i = Math.floor(Math.log(bytes) / Math.log(orderOfMagnitude));
    var result = (bytes / Math.pow(orderOfMagnitude, i));

    // This will get the sign right
    if(pBytes < 0) {
        result *= -1;
    }

    // This bit here is purely for show. it drops the percision on numbers greater than 100 before the units.
    // it also always shows the full number of bytes if bytes is the unit.
    if(result >= 99.995 || i==0) {
        return result.toFixed(0) + ' ' + abbreviations[i];
    } else {
        return result.toFixed(2) + ' ' + abbreviations[i];
    }
}
share|improve this answer
function formatBytes(bytes) {
    if(bytes < 1024) return bytes + " Bytes";
    else if(bytes < 1048576) return(bytes / 1024).toFixed(3) + " KB";
    else if(bytes < 1073741824) return(bytes / 1048576).toFixed(3) + " MB";
    else return(bytes / 1073741824).toFixed(3) + " GB";
};
share|improve this answer

Using bitwise operation would be a better solution. Try this

function formatSizeUnits(bytes)
{
    if ( ( bytes >> 30 ) & 0x3FF )
        bytes = ( bytes >>> 30 ) + '.' + ( bytes & (3*0x3FF )) + 'GB' ;
    else if ( ( bytes >> 20 ) & 0x3FF )
        bytes = ( bytes >>> 20 ) + '.' + ( bytes & (2*0x3FF ) ) + 'MB' ;
    else if ( ( bytes >> 10 ) & 0x3FF )
        bytes = ( bytes >>> 10 ) + '.' + ( bytes & (0x3FF ) ) + 'KB' ;
    else if ( ( bytes >> 1 ) & 0x3FF )
        bytes = ( bytes >>> 1 ) + 'Bytes' ;
    else
        bytes = bytes + 'Byte' ;
    return bytes ;
}
share|improve this answer
7  
???? what ..... – l2aelba Apr 9 '13 at 12:11
1  
Sorry about the return 0. It should be return bytes – Buzz LIghtyear Apr 9 '13 at 12:16
1  
Obtain the remaining bytes. That will provide the decimal portion. – Buzz LIghtyear Apr 9 '13 at 12:30
1  
Its 1024. If you require 100 shift the bits accordingly. – Buzz LIghtyear Apr 9 '13 at 12:36
4  
Dear Amir Haghighat, this is a basic code solely written by me. In javasript post 32 bits of integer value the code will not work since integer is only four bytes. These are basic programming infos that you should be knowing. Stackoverflow is meant only for guiding people and not spoon feeding. – Buzz LIghtyear Nov 6 '13 at 7:38

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