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I currently use:

git log --pretty='format:%ad %Cgreen%h%Cred%d %Creset%s' --date=local

which produces:

Tue Apr 2 16:02:24 2013 b8b3975 Debug info for hidHandle.isClosed added.
Mon Apr 1 15:31:46 2013 6b9b1ca Fixed mouse-button-up event images.
Mon Apr 1 13:23:26 2013 907e8c6 Improved code-behind formatting.
Thu Mar 28 17:14:59 2013 d2edade Remember colors on redraw.
Thu Mar 28 16:49:51 2013 7491a07 Seven colors in a row.

I desire for this:

Tue Apr 02 16:02:24 2013 b8b3975 Debug info for hidHandle.isClosed added.
Mon Apr 01 15:31:46 2013 6b9b1ca Fixed mouse-button-up event images.
Mon Apr 01 13:23:26 2013 907e8c6 Improved code-behind formatting.
Thu Mar 28 17:14:59 2013 d2edade Remember colors on redraw.
Thu Mar 28 16:49:51 2013 7491a07 Seven colors in a row.

Results using --date=relative, --date=iso, --date=rfc and --date=default were not satisfactory.

Am I missing any other option? I am using git version 1.8.1.msysgit.1 on Windows 7 64-bit.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Had a quick look at the sourcecode and what you desire is not possible. You only get that one format if you want timezone-adjusted times. If it’s important to you, you could pass the output through sed:

git log --pretty='format:%ad %Cgreen%h%Cred%d %Creset%s' --date=local | sed 's/^\(.\{7\}\) \([0-9]\) /\1 0\2 /'

If you want to set this up as an alias mylog, run this command:

git config --global alias.mylog '!'"git log --pretty='format:%ad %Cgreen%h%Cred%d %Creset%s' --date=local | sed 's/^\(.\{7\}\) \([0-9]\) /\1 0\2 /'"

Or add this to your ~/.gitconfig

[alias]
        mylog = !git log --pretty='format:%ad %Cgreen%h%Cred%d %Creset%s' --date=local | sed 's/^\\(.\\{7\\}\\) \\([0-9]\\) /\\1 0\\2 /'
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Your solution gives me exactly what I was looking for. Is it possible to somehow incorporate what sed does, into a git alias? Not a big need, just curious. I avoided sed for a long time. Time to get acquainted now. I sed Hi! –  Barn Monkey Apr 9 '13 at 14:38
    
I created an alias for the command in the .bashrc file. –  Barn Monkey Apr 9 '13 at 15:32
1  
Extenden my answer with infos for a git alias. –  Chronial Apr 9 '13 at 15:34
    
I noticed one thing with sed is that it doesn't add a new line at the end, so the bash prompt after the output continues on the same line. –  Barn Monkey Apr 9 '13 at 18:18
1  
I don’t have that problem and can’t reproduce it, but you can try adding a && echo at the end. –  Chronial Apr 9 '13 at 18:54

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