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Is there any way to format a string by name rather than position in C#?

In python, I can do something like this example (shamelessly stolen from here):

>>> print '%(language)s has %(#)03d quote types.' % \
      {'language': "Python", "#": 2}
Python has 002 quote types.

Is there any way to do this in C#? Say for instance:

String.Format("{some_variable}: {some_other_variable}", ...);

Being able to do this using a variable name would be nice, but a dictionary is acceptable too.

UPDATE: I ended up doing something like this post, but it's definitely not pretty. I'll try out John Sheehan's approach, but if anybody has any other suggestions in the meantime, feel free to add them. :)

UPDATE 2: John Sheehan's approach works pretty well. Accepting it.

share|improve this question
    
I'm missing this from Ruby as well. –  JesperE Oct 1 '08 at 18:33
    
I think your example is too simplistic and is leading people to give you unhelpful answers. Maybe using a variable more than once in the string would be more demonstrative. –  Wedge Oct 1 '08 at 18:40
    
Actually, the SPECIFIC confusion is the use of String.Format. That lends itself to answers such as mine, which are not helpful because they're not variable oriented, but are accurate insofar as String.Format is concerned. –  John Rudy Oct 1 '08 at 18:47
1  
The call to String.Format is obviously a contrived example. Unless of course you weren't aware that calling String.Format with ellipses isn't possible. The problem was that I didn't put that I wanted the formatting to happen by named parameters rather than position, which has been fiexed. –  Jason Baker Oct 1 '08 at 19:02
    
FYI: Submitted to MS Connect's User Voice to request this be made a standard feature of the framework. For anyone interested, please upvote: visualstudio.uservoice.com/forums/121579-visual-studio/… –  JohnLBevan Apr 24 at 23:11

15 Answers 15

up vote 92 down vote accepted

There is no built-in method for handling this.

Here's one method

string myString = "{foo} is {bar} and {yadi} is {yada}".Inject(o);

Here's another

Status.Text = "{UserName} last logged in at {LastLoginDate}".FormatWith(user);

A third improved method partially based on the two above, from Phil Haack

share|improve this answer
10  
I've been very happy using FormatWith(), but wanted to point an in issue I recently came across. The implementation relies on the DataBinder from System.Web.UI, which isn't supported in SQL CLR. Inject(o) doesn't rely on the data binder, which made it useful for multi-token-replace in my SQL CLR object. –  EBarr Oct 31 '10 at 17:58

I have an implementation I just posted to my blog here: http://haacked.com/archive/2009/01/04/fun-with-named-formats-string-parsing-and-edge-cases.aspx

It addresses some issues that these other implementations have with brace escaping. The post has details. It does the DataBinder.Eval thing too, but is still very fast.

share|improve this answer
    
Nice thanks for sharing Phil! –  JoshBerke Jan 6 '09 at 13:53
3  
The code available for download in that article 404's. I'd really like to see it, too. –  qes Sep 28 '10 at 15:50
2  
@qes: An updated link was posted in the comments: code.haacked.com/util/NamedStringFormatSolution.zip –  Oliver Salzburg Aug 28 '12 at 11:23
2  
@OliverSalzburg : I've been using SmartFormat for all my formatting needs for some time now, love it. github.com/scottrippey/SmartFormat –  qes Aug 30 '12 at 2:10
    
@qes: Would you mind possibly writing and answer about it and showing how it works? Looks interesting –  Oliver Salzburg Aug 30 '12 at 12:36

You can also use anonymous types like this:

    public string Format(string input, object p)
    {
        foreach (PropertyDescriptor prop in TypeDescriptor.GetProperties(p))
            input = input.Replace("{" + prop.Name + "}", (prop.GetValue(p) ?? "(null)").ToString());

        return input;
    }

Of course it would require more code if you also want to parse formatting, but you can format a string using this function like:

Format("test {first} and {another}", new { first = "something", another = "something else" })
share|improve this answer
    
Love your solution Doggett! –  Nam G VU Nov 2 '10 at 14:00
    
Perfect for those of us still on 2.0. Yeah, I know.... This solution is straightforward and easy to understand. AND IT WORKS!!! –  Brad Bruce Apr 23 '12 at 17:39

There doesn't appear to be a way to do this out of the box. Though, it looks feasible to implement your own IFormatProvider that links to an IDictionary for values.

var Stuff = new Dictionary<string, object> {
   { "language", "Python" },
   { "#", 2 }
};
var Formatter = new DictionaryFormatProvider();

// Interpret {0:x} where {0}=IDictionary and "x" is hash key
Console.WriteLine string.Format(Formatter, "{0:language} has {0:#} quote types", Stuff);

Outputs:

Python has 2 quote types

The caveat is that you can't mix FormatProviders, so the fancy text formatting can't be used at the same time.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for outlining, IMHO, the best conceptual method, which has a nice implementation at mo.notono.us/2008/07/c-stringinject-format-strings-by-key.html - the other posts include this but they also propose the reflection based methods which, IMHO, are rather evil –  Adam Ralph Nov 2 '10 at 11:18
    
this is a creative way to address this problem... in fact I really like it ;) –  boomhauer Sep 25 '11 at 15:19

The framework itself does not provide a way to do this, but you can take a look at this post by Scott Hanselman. Example usage:

Person p = new Person();  
string foo = p.ToString("{Money:C} {LastName}, {ScottName} {BirthDate}");  
Assert.AreEqual("$3.43 Hanselman, {ScottName} 1/22/1974 12:00:00 AM", foo);

This code by James Newton-King is similar and works with sub-properties and indexes,

string foo = "Top result for {Name} was {Results[0].Name}".FormatWith(student));

James's code relies on System.Web.UI.DataBinder to parse the string and requires referencing System.Web, which some people don't like to do in non-web applications.

EDIT: Oh and they work nicely with anonymous types, if you don't have an object with properties ready for it:

string name = ...;
DateTime date = ...;
string foo = "{Name} - {Birthday}".FormatWith(new { Name = name, Birthday = date });
share|improve this answer

I think the closest you'll get is an indexed format:

String.Format("{0} has {1} quote types.", "C#", "1");

There's also String.Replace(), if you're willing to do it in multiple steps and take it on faith that you won't find your 'variables' anywhere else in the string:

string MyString = "{language} has {n} quote types.";
MyString = MyString.Replace("{language}", "C#").Replace("{n}", "1");

Expanding this to use a List:

List<KeyValuePair<string, string>> replacements = GetFormatDictionary();  
foreach (KeyValuePair<string, string> item in replacements)
{
    MyString = MyString.Replace(item.Key, item.Value);
}

You could do that with a Dictionary<string, string> too by iterating it's .Keys collections, but by using a List<KeyValuePair<string, string>> we can take advantage of the List's .ForEach() method and condense it back to a one-liner:

replacements.ForEach(delegate(KeyValuePair<string,string>) item) { MyString = MyString.Replace(item.Key, item.Value);});

A lambda would be even simpler, but I'm still on .Net 2.0. Also note that the .Replace() performance isn't stellar when used iteratively, since strings in .Net are immutable. Also, this requires the MyString variable be defined in such a way that it's accessible to the delegate, so it's not perfect yet.

share|improve this answer
    
lol exactly what I said in the comment under my post. –  Patrick Desjardins Oct 1 '08 at 18:41
    
Well, that's not the prettiest solution, but it's what I'm going with for now. The only thing I did differently was use a StringBuilder instead of a string so that I don't keep making new strings. –  Jason Baker Oct 1 '08 at 22:48

See http://stackoverflow.com/questions/271398?page=2#358259

With the linked-to extension you can write this:

var str = "{foo} {bar} {baz}".Format(foo=>"foo", bar=>2, baz=>new object());

and you'll get "foo 2 System.Object".

share|improve this answer
    
That thread has blown up and is 150 answers long. Can you please clarify which linked to extension you are referring to? –  esac Jun 11 at 21:28
    
It moved to the second page. I updated the link. –  Mark Cidade Jun 12 at 19:53

I doubt this will be possible. The first thing that comes to mind is how are you going to get access to local variable names?

There might be some clever way using LINQ and Lambda expressions to do this however.

share|improve this answer
    
@leppie: +1 if you can give me some LINQ+Lambda to do that ;D (ok +1 for having a relevant answer) –  user7116 Oct 1 '08 at 18:34
    
I would love to see it too! Maybe I will take that challenge! –  leppie Oct 1 '08 at 18:35
    
I figured it would be impossible to do with variable names, but put that in there in case I was wrong. :) There's not any way to do this with a dictionary either? –  Jason Baker Oct 1 '08 at 18:36
    
    
I tried, and got a little somewhere, but I deemed it too ugly and difficult to use. It would have looked like: string s = format(f => f("{hello} {world}", hello, world)); –  leppie Oct 2 '08 at 6:52

Here's one I made a while back. It extends String with a Format method taking a single argument. The nice thing is that it'll use the standard string.Format if you provide a simple argument like an int, but if you use something like anonymous type it'll work too.

Example usage:

"The {Name} family has {Children} children".Format(new { Children = 4, Name = "Smith" })

Would result in "The Smith family has 4 children."

It doesn't do crazy binding stuff like arrays and indexers. But it is super simple and high performance.

    public static class AdvancedFormatString
{

    /// <summary>
    /// An advanced version of string.Format.  If you pass a primitive object (string, int, etc), it acts like the regular string.Format.  If you pass an anonmymous type, you can name the paramters by property name.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="formatString"></param>
    /// <param name="arg"></param>
    /// <returns></returns>
    /// <example>
    /// "The {Name} family has {Children} children".Format(new { Children = 4, Name = "Smith" })
    /// 
    /// results in 
    /// "This Smith family has 4 children
    /// </example>
    public static string Format(this string formatString, object arg, IFormatProvider format = null)
    {
        if (arg == null)
            return formatString;

        var type = arg.GetType();
        if (Type.GetTypeCode(type) != TypeCode.Object || type.IsPrimitive)
            return string.Format(format, formatString, arg);

        var properties = TypeDescriptor.GetProperties(arg);
        return formatString.Format((property) =>
            {
                var value = properties[property].GetValue(arg);
                return Convert.ToString(value, format);
            });
    }


    public static string Format(this string formatString, Func<string, string> formatFragmentHandler)
    {
        if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(formatString))
            return formatString;
        Fragment[] fragments = GetParsedFragments(formatString);
        if (fragments == null || fragments.Length == 0)
            return formatString;

        return string.Join(string.Empty, fragments.Select(fragment =>
            {
                if (fragment.Type == FragmentType.Literal)
                    return fragment.Value;
                else
                    return formatFragmentHandler(fragment.Value);
            }).ToArray());
    }


    private static Fragment[] GetParsedFragments(string formatString)
    {
        Fragment[] fragments;
        if ( parsedStrings.TryGetValue(formatString, out fragments) )
        {
            return fragments;
        }
        lock (parsedStringsLock)
        {
            if ( !parsedStrings.TryGetValue(formatString, out fragments) )
            {
                fragments = Parse(formatString);
                parsedStrings.Add(formatString, fragments);
            }
        }
        return fragments;
    }

    private static Object parsedStringsLock = new Object();
    private static Dictionary<string,Fragment[]> parsedStrings = new Dictionary<string,Fragment[]>(StringComparer.Ordinal);

    const char OpeningDelimiter = '{';
    const char ClosingDelimiter = '}';

    /// <summary>
    /// Parses the given format string into a list of fragments.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="format"></param>
    /// <returns></returns>
    static Fragment[] Parse(string format)
    {
        int lastCharIndex = format.Length - 1;
        int currFragEndIndex;
        Fragment currFrag = ParseFragment(format, 0, out currFragEndIndex);

        if (currFragEndIndex == lastCharIndex)
        {
            return new Fragment[] { currFrag };
        }

        List<Fragment> fragments = new List<Fragment>();
        while (true)
        {
            fragments.Add(currFrag);
            if (currFragEndIndex == lastCharIndex)
            {
                break;
            }
            currFrag = ParseFragment(format, currFragEndIndex + 1, out currFragEndIndex);
        }
        return fragments.ToArray();

    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Finds the next delimiter from the starting index.
    /// </summary>
    static Fragment ParseFragment(string format, int startIndex, out int fragmentEndIndex)
    {
        bool foundEscapedDelimiter = false;
        FragmentType type = FragmentType.Literal;

        int numChars = format.Length;
        for (int i = startIndex; i < numChars; i++)
        {
            char currChar = format[i];
            bool isOpenBrace = currChar == OpeningDelimiter;
            bool isCloseBrace = isOpenBrace ? false : currChar == ClosingDelimiter;

            if (!isOpenBrace && !isCloseBrace)
            {
                continue;
            }
            else if (i < (numChars - 1) && format[i + 1] == currChar)
            {//{{ or }}
                i++;
                foundEscapedDelimiter = true;
            }
            else if (isOpenBrace)
            {
                if (i == startIndex)
                {
                    type = FragmentType.FormatItem;
                }
                else
                {

                    if (type == FragmentType.FormatItem)
                        throw new FormatException("Two consequtive unescaped { format item openers were found.  Either close the first or escape any literals with another {.");

                    //curr character is the opening of a new format item.  so we close this literal out
                    string literal = format.Substring(startIndex, i - startIndex);
                    if (foundEscapedDelimiter)
                        literal = ReplaceEscapes(literal);

                    fragmentEndIndex = i - 1;
                    return new Fragment(FragmentType.Literal, literal);
                }
            }
            else
            {//close bracket
                if (i == startIndex || type == FragmentType.Literal)
                    throw new FormatException("A } closing brace existed without an opening { brace.");

                string formatItem = format.Substring(startIndex + 1, i - startIndex - 1);
                if (foundEscapedDelimiter)
                    formatItem = ReplaceEscapes(formatItem);//a format item with a { or } in its name is crazy but it could be done
                fragmentEndIndex = i;
                return new Fragment(FragmentType.FormatItem, formatItem);
            }
        }

        if (type == FragmentType.FormatItem)
            throw new FormatException("A format item was opened with { but was never closed.");

        fragmentEndIndex = numChars - 1;
        string literalValue = format.Substring(startIndex);
        if (foundEscapedDelimiter)
            literalValue = ReplaceEscapes(literalValue);

        return new Fragment(FragmentType.Literal, literalValue);

    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Replaces escaped brackets, turning '{{' and '}}' into '{' and '}', respectively.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="value"></param>
    /// <returns></returns>
    static string ReplaceEscapes(string value)
    {
        return value.Replace("{{", "{").Replace("}}", "}");
    }

    private enum FragmentType
    {
        Literal,
        FormatItem
    }

    private class Fragment
    {

        public Fragment(FragmentType type, string value)
        {
            Type = type;
            Value = value;
        }

        public FragmentType Type
        {
            get;
            private set;
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// The literal value, or the name of the fragment, depending on fragment type.
        /// </summary>
        public string Value
        {
            get;
            private set;
        }


    }

}
share|improve this answer
private static Regex s_NamedFormatRegex = new Regex(@"\{(?!\{)(?<key>[\w]+)(:(?<fmt>(\{\{|\}\}|[^\{\}])*)?)?\}", RegexOptions.Compiled);

public static StringBuilder AppendNamedFormat(this StringBuilder builder,IFormatProvider provider, string format, IDictionary<string, object> args)
{
    if (builder == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("builder");
    var str = s_NamedFormatRegex.Replace(format, (mt) => {
        string key = mt.Groups["key"].Value;
        string fmt = mt.Groups["fmt"].Value;
        object value = null;
        if (args.TryGetValue(key,out value)) {
            return string.Format(provider, "{0:" + fmt + "}", value);
        } else {
            return mt.Value;
        }
    });
    builder.Append(str);
    return builder;
}

public static StringBuilder AppendNamedFormat(this StringBuilder builder, string format, IDictionary<string, object> args)
{
    if (builder == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("builder");
    return builder.AppendNamedFormat(null, format, args);
}

Example:

var builder = new StringBuilder();
builder.AppendNamedFormat(
@"你好,{Name},今天是{Date:yyyy/MM/dd}, 这是你第{LoginTimes}次登录,积分{Score:{{ 0.00 }}}",
new Dictionary<string, object>() { 
    { "Name", "wayjet" },
    { "LoginTimes",18 },
    { "Score", 100.4 },
    { "Date",DateTime.Now }
});

Output: 你好,wayjet,今天是2011-05-04, 这是你第18次登录,积分{ 100.40 }

share|improve this answer

Check this one:

public static string StringFormat(string format, object source)
{
    var matches = Regex.Matches(format, @"\{(.+?)\}");
    List<string> keys = (from Match matche in matches select matche.Groups[1].Value).ToList();

    return keys.Aggregate(
        format,
        (current, key) =>
        {
            int colonIndex = key.IndexOf(':');
            return current.Replace(
                "{" + key + "}",
                colonIndex > 0
                    ? DataBinder.Eval(source, key.Substring(0, colonIndex), "{0:" + key.Substring(colonIndex + 1) + "}")
                    : DataBinder.Eval(source, key).ToString());
        });
}

Sample:

string format = "{foo} is a {bar} is a {baz} is a {qux:#.#} is a really big {fizzle}";
var o = new { foo = 123, bar = true, baz = "this is a test", qux = 123.45, fizzle = DateTime.Now };
Console.WriteLine(StringFormat(format, o));

Performance is pretty ok compared to other solutions.

share|improve this answer

here is a simple method for any object:

    using System.Text.RegularExpressions;
    using System.ComponentModel;

    public static string StringWithFormat(string format, object args)
    {
        Regex r = new Regex(@"\{([A-Za-z0-9_]+)\}");

        MatchCollection m = r.Matches(format);

        var properties = TypeDescriptor.GetProperties(args);

        foreach (Match item in m)
        {
            try
            {
                string propertyName = item.Groups[1].Value;
                format = format.Replace(item.Value, properties[propertyName].GetValue(args).ToString());
            }
            catch
            {
                throw new FormatException("The format string is not valid");
            }
        }

        return format;
    }

And here how to use it:

 DateTime date = DateTime.Now;
 string dateString = StringWithFormat("{Month}/{Day}/{Year}", date);

output : 2/27/2012

share|improve this answer

My open source library, Regextra, supports named formatting (amongst other things). It currently targets .NET 4.0+ and is available on NuGet. I also have an introductory blog post about it: Regextra: helping you reduce your (problems){2}.

The named formatting bit supports:

  • Basic formatting
  • Nested properties formatting
  • Dictionary formatting
  • Escaping of delimiters
  • Standard/Custom/IFormatProvider string formatting

Example:

var order = new
{
    Description = "Widget",
    OrderDate = DateTime.Now,
    Details = new
    {
        UnitPrice = 1500
    }
};

string template = "We just shipped your order of '{Description}', placed on {OrderDate:d}. Your {{credit}} card will be billed {Details.UnitPrice:C}.";

string result = Template.Format(template, order);
// or use the extension: template.FormatTemplate(order);

Result:

We just shipped your order of 'Widget', placed on 2/28/2014. Your {credit} card will be billed $1,500.00.

Check out the project's GitHub link (above) and wiki for other examples.

share|improve this answer
    
Wow, this looks amazing, particularly for when dealing with some of the more difficult format examples one comes across. –  Nicholas Petersen Jul 18 at 4:47

Interpolated strings were added into C# 6.0 and Visual Basic 14

Enjoy!

share|improve this answer
string language = "Python";
int numquotes = 2;
string output = language + " has "+ numquotes + " language types.";

Edit: What I should have said was, "No, I don't believe what you want to do is supported by C#. This is as close as you are going to get."

share|improve this answer
1  
I'm curious about the down votes. Anybody want to tell me why? –  Kevin Oct 1 '08 at 19:00
3  
1  
So the string.format would perform this operation 4/TenThousandths of a second faster If this function is going to get called a ton you might notice that difference. But it at least answers his question instead of just telling him to do it the same way he already said he didn't want to do it. –  Kevin Oct 1 '08 at 19:34
2  
I didn't vote you down, but I wouldn't implement this mainly because well, I find doing lots of string concatenations ugly. But that's my personal view. –  Jason Baker Oct 1 '08 at 22:45
    
Weird that this got down voted so much. Consider expanding your answer, that when the concatenation isn't called often you could consider "someString" + someVariable + "someOtherString" more readable. This article agrees with you. –  Steven Jeuris Nov 23 '11 at 14:55

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