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Is there a way I can execute a String as a Linq? I had a dynamci query and for that I had to convert the Linq expression into string, then append string bulider which has some conditional query. So whole expression is now in string. How to execute this string now? Should I again convert this string to Linq? How to proceed?

 StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
 if (InstId != String.Empty)
 {
     sb.Append("application.Id ==" + InstId);
 }
 if (BId != String.Empty)
 {
     sb.Append("&& application.BId ==" + BId);
 }
 if (CId != String.Empty)
 {
     sb.Append("&& application.CId ==" + CId);
 }

String query=("from tables in context.Application .........
........join .........."+sb);

var q1=query;

Now how to execute this q1?

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3  
Is there a particular reason you want to build it up as a string? It would be more efficient and safer (IMO) to do this without using a string representation. –  Jon Skeet Apr 9 '13 at 12:51
1  
Well, I mentioned as I had to append some criteria in where clause, so I had to use string builder. –  Iti Tyagi Apr 9 '13 at 12:54
    
You can build up LINQ queries without using strings. Everything you've shown in terms of requirements can definitely be done without using a string representation. –  Jon Skeet Apr 9 '13 at 13:00
    
@Jon Skeet:How? –  Iti Tyagi Apr 9 '13 at 13:04
    
I have different criteria for selection if Id are empty (as I send them as string), so every time my query will change. And this is just a sample, I will have to execute it. –  Iti Tyagi Apr 9 '13 at 13:06
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You don't need StringBuilder for that:

var query = context.Application;

if (InstId != String.Empty)
{
    query = query.Where(a => a.Id == InstId);
}
if (BId != String.Empty)
{
    query = query.Where(a => a.BId == BId);
}
if (CId != String.Empty)
{
    query = query.Where(a => a.CId == CId);
}

var items = query.Join(/* your join here */).ToList();

Query won't be executed untill ToList or other methods like that is invoked, so you can append Where() as long you'd like to.

share|improve this answer
    
I have number of joins in my query and then I use the criteria in the where clause from different tables which are joined. –  Iti Tyagi Apr 9 '13 at 12:56
2  
So prepare queryA, queryB, etc. in similar way and join them. Then you can add another Where on joined data as well. –  MarcinJuraszek Apr 9 '13 at 12:57
    
:Thank you so much I did the same way and it is working fine. –  Iti Tyagi Apr 10 '13 at 5:07
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While I don't necessarily think it's a great practice in a lot of cases, there is a Dynamic LINQ library that allows you to do just that.

In general, if possible, I'd recommend using something that can be more strongly type checked, such as @MarcinJuraszak's response or something like a PredicateBuilder class.

share|improve this answer
    
I had already gone through the above mentioned link and that was of no help as I am having number of joins in my query. –  Iti Tyagi Apr 9 '13 at 13:04
    
@ItiTyagi what specific issues do the joins cause? Building up a Where clause predicate will work on single tables or joined tables –  goric Apr 9 '13 at 13:10
    
I am able to solve that by the above mentioned way and it is working fine now. –  Iti Tyagi Apr 10 '13 at 5:08
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