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What is the best way to implement a Stack and a Queue in JavaScript?

I'm looking to do the shunting-yard algorithm and I'm going to need these data-structures.

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13 Answers 13

up vote 534 down vote accepted
var stack = [];
stack.push(2);       // stack is now [2]
stack.push(5);       // stack is now [2, 5]
var i = stack.pop(); // stack is now [2]
alert(i);            // displays 5

var queue = [];
queue.push(2);         // queue is now [2]
queue.push(5);         // queue is now [2, 5]
var i = queue.shift(); // queue is now [5]
alert(i);              // displays 2

taken from "9 javascript tips you may not know"

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41  
I would advise caution in using queue.shift. IIRC it is not O(1), but O(n) and might be too slow if the queue gets large. – MAK Oct 19 '09 at 18:29
8  
I'd say this depends on the javascript implementation. I don't think it's defined in the javascript spec. – Georg Schölly Oct 19 '09 at 19:18
6  
See code.stephenmorley.org/javascript/queues for a simple implementation that improves queue performance. – Gili Jan 21 '13 at 19:24
7  
For Queue performance issues, see a nice comparison of three different types of stack behaviors on jsperf.com/queue-push-unshift-vs-shift-pop -- Now if only someone was nice enough to include a rev of that jsperf that would contain the JS script that @Gili mentioned... – Nenotlep Apr 24 '13 at 10:13
2  
I resurrected the blog post linked in this answer since archive.org isn't always the most performant. I updated links and images so they work but I didn't change anything else. – Chev Sep 19 '13 at 21:43

Javascript has push and pop methods, which operate on ordinary Javascript array objects.

For queues, look here:

http://safalra.com/web-design/javascript/queues/

Queues can be implemented in JavaScript using either the push and shift methods or unshift and pop methods of the array object. Although this is a simple way to implement queues, it is very inefficient for large queues — because the methods operate on arrays, the shift and unshift methods move every element in the array each time they are called.

Queue.js is a simple and efficient queue implementation for JavaScript whose dequeue function runs in amortised constant time. As a result, for larger queues it can be significantly faster than using arrays.

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7  
+1 for link to implementation of a delayed shift queue – Christoph Oct 19 '09 at 21:49

Arrays.

Stack:

var stack = [];

//put value on top of stack
stack.push(1);

//remove value from top of stack
var value = stack.pop();

Queue:

var queue = [];

//put value on end of queue
queue.push(1);

//Take first value from queue
var value = queue.shift();
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If you wanted to make your own data structures, you could build your own:

var Stack = function(){
  this.top = null;
  this.size = 0;
};

var Node = function(data){
  this.data = data;
  this.previous = null;
};

Stack.prototype.push = function(data) {
  var node = new Node(data);

  node.previous = this.top;
  this.top = node;
  this.size += 1;
  return this.top;
};

Stack.prototype.pop = function() {
  temp = this.top;
  this.top = this.top.previous;
  this.size -= 1;
  return temp;
};

And for queue:

var Queue = function() {
  this.first = null;
  this.size = 0;
};

var Node = function(data) {
  this.data = data;
  this.next = null;
};

Queue.prototype.enqueue = function(data) {
  var node = new Node(data);

  if (!this.first){
    this.first = node;
  } else {
    n = this.first;
    while (n.next) {
      n = n.next;
    }
    n.next = node;
  }

  this.size += 1;
  return node;
};

Queue.prototype.dequeue = function() {
  temp = this.first;
  this.first = this.first.next;
  this.size -= 1;
  return temp;
};
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4  
To avoid needing to iterate over the entire thing in order to append to the end, store a reference to the last one via this.last=node; – Perkins Apr 17 '15 at 4:56
1  
Never implement any Queue like this unless you have a really good reason for it... while it might seem logically correct, CPUs don't operate according to human abstractions. Iterating over a datastructure that has pointers all over the place will result in cache misses in the CPU, unlike a sequential array which is highly efficient. blog.davidecoppola.com/2014/05/… CPUs HATE pointers with a burning passion - they are probably the #1 cause of cache misses and having to access memory from RAM. – Centril Sep 16 '15 at 19:51
    
this is a tempting solution, but I don't see created Nodes being deleted when popping/dequeuing ... won't they just sit around hogging memory until the browser crashes? – cneuro Feb 29 at 11:49

Or else you can use two arrays to implement queue data structure.

var temp_stack = new Array();
var stack = new Array();

temp_stack.push(1);
temp_stack.push(2);
temp_stack.push(3);

If I pop the elements now then the output will be 3,2,1. But we want FIFO structure so you can do the following.

stack.push(temp_stack.pop());
stack.push(temp_stack.pop());
stack.push(temp_stack.pop());

stack.pop(); //Pop out 1
stack.pop(); //Pop out 2
stack.pop(); //Pop out 3
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The regular Array structure in Javascript is a Stack (first in, last out) and can also be used as a Queue (first in, first out) depending on the calls you make.

Check this link to see how to make an Array act like a Queue:

Queues

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/*------------------------------------------------------------------ 
 Defining Stack Operations using Closures in Javascript, privacy and
 state of stack operations are maintained

 @author:Arijt Basu
 Log: Sun Dec 27, 2015, 3:25PM
 ------------------------------------------------------------------- 
 */
var stackControl = true;
var stack = (function(array) {
        array = [];
        //--Define the max size of the stack
        var MAX_SIZE = 5;

        function isEmpty() {
            if (array.length < 1) console.log("Stack is empty");
        };
        isEmpty();

        return {

            push: function(ele) {
                if (array.length < MAX_SIZE) {
                    array.push(ele)
                    return array;
                } else {
                    console.log("Stack Overflow")
                }
            },
            pop: function() {
                if (array.length > 1) {
                    array.pop();
                    return array;
                } else {
                    console.log("Stack Underflow");
                }
            }

        }
    })()
    // var list = 5;
    // console.log(stack(list))
if (stackControl) {
    console.log(stack.pop());
    console.log(stack.push(3));
    console.log(stack.push(2));
    console.log(stack.pop());
    console.log(stack.push(1));
    console.log(stack.pop());
    console.log(stack.push(38));
    console.log(stack.push(22));
    console.log(stack.pop());
    console.log(stack.pop());
    console.log(stack.push(6));
    console.log(stack.pop());
}
//End of STACK Logic

/* Defining Queue operations*/

var queue = (function(array) {
    array = [];
    var reversearray;
    //--Define the max size of the stack
    var MAX_SIZE = 5;

    function isEmpty() {
        if (array.length < 1) console.log("Queue is empty");
    };
    isEmpty();

    return {
        insert: function(ele) {
            if (array.length < MAX_SIZE) {
                array.push(ele)
                reversearray = array.reverse();
                return reversearray;
            } else {
                console.log("Queue Overflow")
            }
        },
        delete: function() {
            if (array.length > 1) {
                //reversearray = array.reverse();
                array.pop();
                return array;
            } else {
                console.log("Queue Underflow");
            }
        }
    }



})()

console.log(queue.insert(5))
console.log(queue.insert(3))
console.log(queue.delete(3))
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You can use your own customize class based on the concept, here the code snippet which you can use to do the stuff

/*
*   Stack implementation in JavaScript
*/

function Stack(){
    this.top = null;
    this.count = 0;

    this.GetCount = function(){
        return this.count;
    }

    this.GetTop = function(){
        return this.top;
    }

    this.Push = function(data){
        var node = {
            data : data,
            next : null
        }

        node.next = this.top;
        this.top = node;

        this.count++;
    }

    this.Peek = function(){
        if(this.top === null){
            return null;
        }else{
            return this.top.data;
        }
    }

    this.Pop = function(){
        if(this.top === null){
            return null;
        }else{
            var out = this.top;
            this.top = this.top.next;
            if(this.count>0){
                this.count--;
            }

            return out.data;
        }
    }

    this.DisplayAll = function(){
        if(this.top === null){
            return null;
        }else{
            var arr = new Array();

            var current = this.top;
            //console.log(current);
            for(var i = 0;i<this.count;i++){
                arr[i] = current.data;
                current = current.next;
            }

            return arr;
        }
    }
}

and to check this use your console and try these line one by one.

>> var st = new Stack();

>> st.Push("BP");

>> st.Push("NK");

>> st.GetTop();

>> st.GetCount();

>> st.DisplayAll();

>> st.Pop();

>> st.DisplayAll();

>> st.GetTop();

>> st.Peek();
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Downvote for a naming convention: method that starts with a capital assumed to be a constructor. – Pavlo Dec 29 '14 at 18:25

No Array(s)

//Javascript stack linked list data structure (no array)

function node(value, noderef) {
    this.value = value;
    this.next = noderef;
}
function stack() {
    this.push = function (value) {
        this.next = this.first;
        this.first = new node(value, this.next);
    }
    this.pop = function () {
        var popvalue = this.first.value;
        this.first = this.first.next;
        return popvalue;
    }
    this.hasnext = function () {
        return this.next != undefined;
    }
    this.isempty = function () {
        return this.first == undefined;
    }

}

//Javascript stack linked list data structure (no array)
function node(value, noderef) {
    this.value = value;
    this.next = undefined;
}
function queue() {
    this.enqueue = function (value) {
        this.oldlast = this.last;
        this.last = new node(value);
        if (this.isempty())
            this.first = this.last;
        else 
           this.oldlast.next = this.last;
    }
    this.dequeue = function () {
        var queuvalue = this.first.value;
        this.first = this.first.next;
        return queuvalue;
    }
    this.hasnext = function () {
        return this.first.next != undefined;
    }
    this.isempty = function () {
        return this.first == undefined;
    }

}
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If you understand stacks with push() and pop() functions, then queue is just to make one of these operations in the oposite sense. Oposite of push() is unshift() and oposite of pop() es shift(). Then:

//classic stack
var stack = [];
stack.push("first"); // push inserts at the end
stack.push("second");
stack.push("last");
stack.pop(); //pop takes the "last" element

//One way to implement queue is to insert elements in the oposite sense than a stack
var queue = [];
queue.unshift("first"); //unshift inserts at the beginning
queue.unshift("second");
queue.unshift("last");
queue.pop(); //"first"

//other way to do queues is to take the elements in the oposite sense than stack
var queue = [];
queue.push("first"); //push, as in the stack inserts at the end
queue.push("second");
queue.push("last");
queue.shift(); //but shift takes the "first" element
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My implementation of Stack and Queue using Linked List

// Linked List
function Node(data) {
  this.data = data;
  this.next = null;
}

// Stack implemented using LinkedList
function Stack() {
  this.top = null;
}

Stack.prototype.push = function(data) {
  var newNode = new Node(data);

  newNode.next = this.top; //Special attention
  this.top = newNode;
}

Stack.prototype.pop = function() {
  if (this.top !== null) {
    var topItem = this.top.data;
    this.top = this.top.next;
    return topItem;
  }
  return null;
}

Stack.prototype.print = function() {
  var curr = this.top;
  while (curr) {
    console.log(curr.data);
    curr = curr.next;
  }
}

// var stack = new Stack();
// stack.push(3);
// stack.push(5);
// stack.push(7);
// stack.print();

// Queue implemented using LinkedList
function Queue() {
  this.head = null;
  this.tail = null;
}

Queue.prototype.enqueue = function(data) {
  var newNode = new Node(data);

  if (this.head === null) {
    this.head = newNode;
    this.tail = newNode;
  } else {
    this.tail.next = newNode;
    this.tail = newNode;
  }
}

Queue.prototype.dequeue = function() {
  var newNode;
  if (this.head !== null) {
    newNode = this.head.data;
    this.head = this.head.next;
  }
  return newNode;
}

Queue.prototype.print = function() {
  var curr = this.head;
  while (curr) {
    console.log(curr.data);
    curr = curr.next;
  }
}

var queue = new Queue();
queue.enqueue(3);
queue.enqueue(5);
queue.enqueue(7);
queue.print();
queue.dequeue();
queue.dequeue();
queue.print();

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Create a pair of classes that provide the various methods that each of these data structures has (push, pop, peek, etc). Now implement the methods. If you're familiar with the concepts behind stack/queue, this should be pretty straightforward. You can implement the stack with an array, and a queue with a linked list, although there are certainly other ways to go about it. Javascript will make this easy, because it is weakly typed, so you don't even have to worry about generic types, which you'd have to do if you were implementing it in Java or C#.

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Javascript array shift() is slow especially when holding many elements. I know two ways to implement queue with amortized O(1) complexity.

First is by using circular buffer and table doubling. I have implemented this before. You can see my source code here https://github.com/kevyuu/rapid-queue

The second way is by using two stack. This is the code for queue with two stack

function createDoubleStackQueue() {
var that = {};
var pushContainer = [];
var popContainer = [];

function moveElementToPopContainer() {
    while (pushContainer.length !==0 ) {
        var element = pushContainer.pop();
        popContainer.push(element);
    }
}

that.push = function(element) {
    pushContainer.push(element);
};

that.shift = function() {
    if (popContainer.length === 0) {
        moveElementToPopContainer();
    }
    if (popContainer.length === 0) {
        return null;
    } else {
        return popContainer.pop();
    }
};

that.front = function() {
    if (popContainer.length === 0) {
        moveElementToPopContainer();
    }
    if (popContainer.length === 0) {
        return null;
    }
    return popContainer[popContainer.length - 1];
};

that.length = function() {
    return pushContainer.length + popContainer.length;
};

that.isEmpty = function() {
    return (pushContainer.length + popContainer.length) === 0;
};

return that;}

This is performance comparison using jsPerf

CircularQueue.shift() vs Array.shift()

http://jsperf.com/rapidqueue-shift-vs-array-shift

As you can see it is significantly faster with large dataset

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