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A sample method with XML documentation:

// summary and param tags are here when you're not looking.
/// <exception cref="ArgumentNullException>
///    <paramref name="text" /> is null.
/// </exception>
public void Write(string text)
{
    if (text == null)
        throw new ArgumentNullException("text", "Text must not be null.");

    // sync stuff...
}

Write(null) throws an exception as expected. Here is an asynchronous method:

public async Task WriteAsync(string text)
{
    if (text == null)
        throw new ArgumentNullException("text", "Text must not be null.");

    // async stuff...
}

WriteAsync(null), won't throw an exception until awaited. Should I specify the ArgumentNullException in an exception tag anyway? I think it would make the consumer think that calling WriteAsync may throw an ArgumentNullException and write something like this:

Task t;
try
{
    t = foo.WriteAsync(text);
}
catch (ArgumentNullException)
{
    // handling stuff.
}

What is the best practice for documenting exceptions in asynchronous methods?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Not a direct answer, but personally I'd advise leaning towards fast-fail here; this might mean writing 2 methods:

public Task WriteAsync(string text) // no "async"
{
    // validation
    if (text == null)
        throw new ArgumentNullException("text", "Text must not be null.");

    return WriteAsyncImpl(text);
}
private async Task WriteAsyncImpl(string text)
{
    // async stuff...
}

This pattern is also an ideal place to add "fast path" code, for example:

public Task WriteAsync(string text) // no "async"
{
    // validation
    if (text == null)
        throw new ArgumentNullException("text", "Text must not be null.");

    if (some condition)
        return Task.FromResult(0); // or similar; also returning a pre-existing
                                   // Task instance can be useful

    return WriteAsyncImpl(text);
}
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1  
+1 And a longer explanation is in Jon Skeet's blog: msmvps.com/blogs/jon_skeet/archive/2010/11/01/… –  Lasse Espeholt Apr 9 '13 at 13:08
    
+1, I do that. :) But what if there are exceptions that can be thrown after awaiting, exceptions that are not related to argument validations? Should I specify them in xml documentation? –  Şafak Gür Apr 9 '13 at 13:10
    
You have not addressed the point in question; i.e. how to handle the exceptions... –  Killercam Apr 9 '13 at 13:11
4  
@Killercam I addressed the example from the question, and I noted that it indeed may not apply to all circumstances - but (see comment immediately above) I'm not sure there is a single answer to that. –  Marc Gravell Apr 9 '13 at 13:15
1  
Gotcha, cheers for the reply. All the best... –  Killercam Apr 9 '13 at 13:35

Microsoft doesn't seem to differentiate between the async method throwing an exception and the returned Task having an exception stored in its Exception property. E.g.:

WebClient.DownloadFileTaskAsync(string, string)

Personally, I would choose to document the exceptions as part of the documentation for the return value (i.e. the returned Task), since the distinction may be important for clients.

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