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I am overloading the System.IO BinaryReader to serialize some classes for file storage purposes. I have had no issues doing items like dictionaries and such, but have not been successful with a nullable type. Is it possible to do? Specifically I am attempting decimal? and string?, but any types should work for me to adapt my solution to.

I have to do binary serialization for specific business reasons, so please limit responses to only solutions that work for that.

For Example... for Reading/Writing a Byte Array I use these methods:

    public byte[] ReadByteArray()
    {
        int len = ReadInt32();
        if (len > 0) return ReadBytes(len);
        if (len < 0) return null;
        return new byte[0];
    }

    public override void Write(byte[] b)
    {
        int len = b.Length;
        Write(len);
        if (len > 0) base.Write(b);
    }
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2  
Can you provide a code example? –  IAbstract Apr 9 '13 at 13:36
    
Is there any reason you can't use the built-in BinaryFormatter? –  default.kramer Apr 9 '13 at 13:51
    
There is a speed issue with the built in. I have a 20-100x speed improvement this way. I think I solved it by checking if the value is null at the beginning though and just using the default reader after that as needed. –  RiddlerDev Apr 9 '13 at 14:07
    
byte[] myNull = ReadByteArray();//with negative int32 'len' –  user1016736 Jul 9 '13 at 1:28

2 Answers 2

You will need to add some kind of flag to let the reader know if it should read the next bytes or not.

public decimal? ReadNullableDecimal()
{
    bool hasValue = ReadBoolean();
    if (hasValue) return ReadDecimal();
    return null;
}

public void Write(decimal? val)
{
    bool hasValue = val.HasValue;
    Write(hasValue)
    if(hasValue)
        Write(val.Value);
}

However we can be clever and create a generic method that works for all struct based types

public Nullable<T> ReadNullable<T>(Func<T> ReadDelegate) where T : struct
{
    bool hasValue = ReadBoolean();
    if (hasValue) return ReadDelegate();
    return null;
}

public void Write<T>(Nullable<T> val) where T : struct
{
    bool hasValue = val.HasValue;
    Write(hasValue)
    if(hasValue)
        Write(val.Value);
}

If I wanted to use my ReadNullable function to read a Int32 I would call it like

Int32? nullableInt = customBinaryReader.ReadNullable(customBinaryReader.ReadInt32);

So it would test if the value exists, then if it does it would then call the passed in function.


EDIT: After sleeping on it, the Write<T> method may not work like you expect it to. Because T is not a well defined type the only method that could support it would be Write(object) which Binary writer does not support out of the box. ReadNullable<T> will still work, and if you want to use still use Write<T> you will need to make the result of val.Value dynamic. You will need to benchmark to see if there are any performance issues with this.

public void Write<T>(Nullable<T> val) where T : struct
{
    bool hasValue = val.HasValue;
    Write(hasValue)
    if(hasValue)
        Write((dynamic)val.Value);
}
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In case the value is null, write a 0 in lieu of the value. When reading, if the value is null, just read the zero and throw it away. That way, you do not need a flag. –  Tarik Jul 9 '13 at 5:13
    
Umm @Tarik, So how do you tell the diffrence between decimal? foo = 0 and decimal? foo = null? –  Scott Chamberlain Jul 9 '13 at 5:14
    
Read hasValue boolean. Case True, ReadDecimal and return it. Case hasValue false, ReadDecimal and return null. –  Tarik Jul 9 '13 at 5:27
    
@Tarik I don't understand how that is "not needing the flag", your first step is "Read hasValue boolean". I could see calling Write(default(T)) instead of writing nothing at all, but that is just a waist of space and extra I/O that is unnecessary that would slow the reader down. –  Scott Chamberlain Jul 9 '13 at 5:31
    
You are correct indeed. +1 Vote. –  Tarik Jul 9 '13 at 5:41
public decimal ReadDecimal()
{
    int len = ReadInt32();
    if (len > 0) return base.ReadDecimal();
    if (len < 0) return null;
    return new decimal;
}


public override void WriteDecimal(decimal d)
{
    if (d==null)
        WriteInt32(-1);
    else
    {
        WriteInt32(sizeof(d)); //16
        Write(d);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Surely WriteDecimal(decimal d) is more explicit (for code readability) and symmetrical with ReadDecimal(). Also, 'WriteDecimal' is distinct from the superclass 'Write' so avoids the "base" specification. –  user1016736 Jul 9 '13 at 1:46

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