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Are disabling and enabling foreign key constraints supported in SQL Server? Or is my only option to drop and then re-create the constraints?

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82  
For folks asking "why" I would want to do this: It is for a test environment where I want to be able to remove and load test data from multiple tables without needing to maintain and specify the order of how the data is loaded. Data integrity is not that important for this scenario. –  Ray Vega Oct 1 '08 at 18:48
12  
All these why questions--don't people have any imagination? –  threed Dec 12 '14 at 20:58

10 Answers 10

up vote 726 down vote accepted

If you want to disable all constraints in the database just run this code:

-- disable all constraints
EXEC sp_msforeachtable "ALTER TABLE ? NOCHECK CONSTRAINT all"

To switch them back on, run: (the print is optional of course and it is just listing the tables)

-- enable all constraints
exec sp_msforeachtable @command1="print '?'", @command2="ALTER TABLE ? WITH CHECK CHECK CONSTRAINT all"

I find it useful when populating data from one database to another. It is much better approach than dropping constraints. As you mentioned it comes handy when dropping all the data in the database and repopulating it (say in test environment).

If you are deleting all the data you may find this solution to be helpful.

Also sometimes it is handy to disable all triggers as well, you can see the complete solution here.

share|improve this answer
5  
"ALTER TABLE ? WITH CHECK CHECK CONSTRAINT all" Should there be only one "CHECK" there? –  CrazyPyro May 3 '11 at 14:53
10  
@CrazyPyro - no you need both –  kristof May 4 '11 at 13:35
14  
@CrazyPyro: both are indeed needed, reason for that is because the first CHECK belongs with the WITH and the second CHECK with the CONSTRAINT (it's the type of constraint). The first CHECK ensures your data gets checked for consistency when activating the constraint. If you don't want that, you could write WITH NOCHECK. Can be useful in certain test situations when you don't care about the actual data, as long as there is some so that your queries have something to play with. –  Valentino Vranken Jan 20 '12 at 9:39
5  
Is it bad that I get this result on the second command? "The ALTER TABLE statement conflicted with the FOREIGN KEY constraint ..." –  Scott Beeson Aug 20 '12 at 22:18
7  
It's worth noting that even with constraints disabled, TRUNCATE TABLE won't work. For that, you will need to drop the constraints. Otherwise, use DELETE FROM, but take into consideration the difference: mssqltips.com/sqlservertip/1080/… –  James McCormack Dec 10 '12 at 11:12

http://www.sqljunkies.com/WebLog/roman/archive/2005/01/30/7037.aspx

-- Disable all table constraints

ALTER TABLE MyTable NOCHECK CONSTRAINT ALL

-- Enable all table constraints

ALTER TABLE MyTable CHECK CONSTRAINT ALL

-- Disable single constraint

ALTER TABLE MyTable NOCHECK CONSTRAINT MyConstraint

-- Enable single constraint

ALTER TABLE MyTable CHECK CONSTRAINT MyConstraint
share|improve this answer
17  
a good find, but note that you still cannot truncate the table without removing the foreign key constraints –  Steven A. Lowe Oct 1 '08 at 18:41
1  
and you will also need to be aware that when you turn the constraints back on and do a data integrity check, your data may fail and fixng an issue like that can be a nightmare if the failing data is at the end of a long string of linked constraints. –  Jimoc Oct 1 '08 at 18:44
    
my sql server 2008 asks for check check instead of check and check nocheck –  Omu Mar 10 '11 at 13:48
1  
You also need a second check when turning the constraints back on. Otherwise, as-is, your code will only check the constraint once, not turn it on. –  ps2goat Jul 25 '13 at 22:26
1  
yes, "with check check" needed for 2012. Edit was rejected? MS Link –  crokusek Jan 25 '14 at 1:10

I had a similar situation where I had no time to analyze the entire schema, so I did what YourdanGeorgiev suggested.

--
-- DROP CONSTRAINTS 
--
SELECT 'ALTER TABLE ' + '[' + OBJECT_NAME(f.parent_object_id)+ ']'+
' DROP  CONSTRAINT ' + '[' + f.name  + ']'
FROM .sys.foreign_keys AS f
INNER JOIN .sys.foreign_key_columns AS fc
ON f.OBJECT_ID = fc.constraint_object_id


-- 
-- RECREATE CONSTRAINTS
--
SELECT 'ALTER TABLE [' + OBJECT_NAME(f.parent_object_id)+ ']' +
' ADD CONSTRAINT ' + '[' +  f.name  +']'+ ' FOREIGN KEY'+'('+COL_NAME(fc.parent_object_id,fc.parent_column_id)+')'
+'REFERENCES ['+OBJECT_NAME (f.referenced_object_id)+']('+COL_NAME(fc.referenced_object_id,
fc.referenced_column_id)+')' as Scripts
FROM .sys.foreign_keys AS f
INNER JOIN .sys.foreign_key_columns AS fc
ON f.OBJECT_ID = fc.constraint_object_id

Run the code above and save the results for both drop and recreate, then execute all the drops followed by your code and then recreate the constraints using the results from the second query.

share|improve this answer
17  
I hope your database has no composite keys or this script will totally munge everything. WARNING TO USERS OF THIS SCRIPT: make sure your database doesn't have any foreign keys with more than one column! –  ErikE Oct 1 '13 at 15:29

Your best option is to DROP and CREATE foreign key constraints.

I didn't find examples in this post that would work for me "as-is", one would not work if foreign keys reference different schemas, the other would not work if foreign key references multiple columns. This script considers both, multiple schemas and multiple columns per foreign key.

Here is the script that generates "ADD CONSTRAINT" statements, for multiple columns it will separate them by comma (be sure to save this output before executing DROP statements):

PRINT N'-- CREATE FOREIGN KEY CONSTRAINTS --';

SET NOCOUNT ON;
SELECT '
PRINT N''Creating '+ const.const_name +'...''
GO
ALTER TABLE ' + const.parent_obj + '
    ADD CONSTRAINT ' + const.const_name + ' FOREIGN KEY (
            ' + const.parent_col_csv + '
            ) REFERENCES ' + const.ref_obj + '(' + const.ref_col_csv + ')
GO'
FROM (
    SELECT QUOTENAME(fk.NAME) AS [const_name]
        ,QUOTENAME(schParent.NAME) + '.' + QUOTENAME(OBJECT_name(fkc.parent_object_id)) AS [parent_obj]
        ,STUFF((
                SELECT ',' + QUOTENAME(COL_NAME(fcP.parent_object_id, fcp.parent_column_id))
                FROM sys.foreign_key_columns AS fcP
                WHERE fcp.constraint_object_id = fk.object_id
                FOR XML path('')
                ), 1, 1, '') AS [parent_col_csv]
        ,QUOTENAME(schRef.NAME) + '.' + QUOTENAME(OBJECT_NAME(fkc.referenced_object_id)) AS [ref_obj]
        ,STUFF((
                SELECT ',' + QUOTENAME(COL_NAME(fcR.referenced_object_id, fcR.referenced_column_id))
                FROM sys.foreign_key_columns AS fcR
                WHERE fcR.constraint_object_id = fk.object_id
                FOR XML path('')
                ), 1, 1, '') AS [ref_col_csv]
    FROM sys.foreign_key_columns AS fkc
    INNER JOIN sys.foreign_keys AS fk ON fk.object_id = fkc.constraint_object_id
    INNER JOIN sys.objects AS oParent ON oParent.object_id = fkc.parent_object_id
    INNER JOIN sys.schemas AS schParent ON schParent.schema_id = oParent.schema_id
    INNER JOIN sys.objects AS oRef ON oRef.object_id = fkc.referenced_object_id
    INNER JOIN sys.schemas AS schRef ON schRef.schema_id = oRef.schema_id
    GROUP BY fkc.parent_object_id
        ,fkc.referenced_object_id
        ,fk.NAME
        ,fk.object_id
        ,schParent.NAME
        ,schRef.NAME
    ) AS const
ORDER BY const.const_name

Here is the script that generates "DROP CONSTRAINT" statements:

PRINT N'-- DROP FOREIGN KEY CONSTRAINTS --';

SET NOCOUNT ON;

SELECT '
PRINT N''Dropping ' + fk.NAME + '...''
GO
ALTER TABLE [' + sch.NAME + '].[' + OBJECT_NAME(fk.parent_object_id) + ']' + ' DROP  CONSTRAINT ' + '[' + fk.NAME + ']
GO'
FROM sys.foreign_keys AS fk
INNER JOIN sys.schemas AS sch ON sch.schema_id = fk.schema_id
ORDER BY fk.NAME
share|improve this answer
    
Can u explain why it's better than disabling and re-enabling constraints? –  Mahmoodvcs May 20 '14 at 7:46
    
prntscr.com/4q5ok5, why this is happening? –  Oğuzhan Topçu Sep 25 '14 at 13:26

The SQL-92 standard allows for a constaint to be declared as DEFERRABLE so that it can be deferred (implicitly or explicitly) within the scope of a transaction. Sadly, SQL Server is still missing this SQL-92 functionality.

For me, changing a constraint to NOCHECK is akin to changing the database structure on the fly -- dropping constraints certainly is -- and something to be avoided (e.g. users require increased privileges).

share|improve this answer
   --Drop and Recreate Foreign Key Constraints

SET NOCOUNT ON

DECLARE @table TABLE(
   RowId INT PRIMARY KEY IDENTITY(1, 1),
   ForeignKeyConstraintName NVARCHAR(200),
   ForeignKeyConstraintTableSchema NVARCHAR(200),
   ForeignKeyConstraintTableName NVARCHAR(200),
   ForeignKeyConstraintColumnName NVARCHAR(200),
   PrimaryKeyConstraintName NVARCHAR(200),
   PrimaryKeyConstraintTableSchema NVARCHAR(200),
   PrimaryKeyConstraintTableName NVARCHAR(200),
   PrimaryKeyConstraintColumnName NVARCHAR(200)    
)

INSERT INTO @table(ForeignKeyConstraintName, ForeignKeyConstraintTableSchema, ForeignKeyConstraintTableName, ForeignKeyConstraintColumnName)
SELECT 
   U.CONSTRAINT_NAME, 
   U.TABLE_SCHEMA, 
   U.TABLE_NAME, 
   U.COLUMN_NAME 
FROM 
   INFORMATION_SCHEMA.KEY_COLUMN_USAGE U
      INNER JOIN INFORMATION_SCHEMA.TABLE_CONSTRAINTS C
         ON U.CONSTRAINT_NAME = C.CONSTRAINT_NAME
WHERE
   C.CONSTRAINT_TYPE = 'FOREIGN KEY'

UPDATE @table SET
   PrimaryKeyConstraintName = UNIQUE_CONSTRAINT_NAME
FROM 
   @table T
      INNER JOIN INFORMATION_SCHEMA.REFERENTIAL_CONSTRAINTS R
         ON T.ForeignKeyConstraintName = R.CONSTRAINT_NAME

UPDATE @table SET
   PrimaryKeyConstraintTableSchema  = TABLE_SCHEMA,
   PrimaryKeyConstraintTableName  = TABLE_NAME
FROM @table T
   INNER JOIN INFORMATION_SCHEMA.TABLE_CONSTRAINTS C
      ON T.PrimaryKeyConstraintName = C.CONSTRAINT_NAME

UPDATE @table SET
   PrimaryKeyConstraintColumnName = COLUMN_NAME
FROM @table T
   INNER JOIN INFORMATION_SCHEMA.KEY_COLUMN_USAGE U
      ON T.PrimaryKeyConstraintName = U.CONSTRAINT_NAME

--SELECT * FROM @table

--DROP CONSTRAINT:
SELECT
   '
   ALTER TABLE [' + ForeignKeyConstraintTableSchema + '].[' + ForeignKeyConstraintTableName + '] 
   DROP CONSTRAINT ' + ForeignKeyConstraintName + '

   GO'
FROM
   @table

--ADD CONSTRAINT:
SELECT
   '
   ALTER TABLE [' + ForeignKeyConstraintTableSchema + '].[' + ForeignKeyConstraintTableName + '] 
   ADD CONSTRAINT ' + ForeignKeyConstraintName + ' FOREIGN KEY(' + ForeignKeyConstraintColumnName + ') REFERENCES [' + PrimaryKeyConstraintTableSchema + '].[' + PrimaryKeyConstraintTableName + '](' + PrimaryKeyConstraintColumnName + ')

   GO'
FROM
   @table

GO

I do agree with you, Hamlin. When you are transfer data using SSIS or when want to replicate data, it seems quite necessary to temporarily disable or drop foreign key constraints and then re-enable or recreate them. In these cases, referential integrity is not an issue, because it is already maintained in the source database. Therefore, you can rest assured regarding this matter.

share|improve this answer
    
This script is great for generating my "ALTER" commands, but how can I get these to execute/run in an SP? –  BlueChippy Jun 27 '12 at 10:49
1  
I think this won't work if any of the foreign keys is multi-column –  Zar Shardan Aug 10 '12 at 12:06
    
This also did not produce all characters for exceedingly long table/key names. –  Joshua Drake Jul 2 '13 at 16:04
SET NOCOUNT ON

DECLARE @table TABLE(
   RowId INT PRIMARY KEY IDENTITY(1, 1),
   ForeignKeyConstraintName NVARCHAR(200),
   ForeignKeyConstraintTableSchema NVARCHAR(200),
   ForeignKeyConstraintTableName NVARCHAR(200),
   ForeignKeyConstraintColumnName NVARCHAR(200),
   PrimaryKeyConstraintName NVARCHAR(200),
   PrimaryKeyConstraintTableSchema NVARCHAR(200),
   PrimaryKeyConstraintTableName NVARCHAR(200),
   PrimaryKeyConstraintColumnName NVARCHAR(200),
   UpdateRule NVARCHAR(100),
   DeleteRule NVARCHAR(100)   
)

INSERT INTO @table(ForeignKeyConstraintName, ForeignKeyConstraintTableSchema, ForeignKeyConstraintTableName, ForeignKeyConstraintColumnName)
SELECT 
   U.CONSTRAINT_NAME, 
   U.TABLE_SCHEMA, 
   U.TABLE_NAME, 
   U.COLUMN_NAME
FROM 
   INFORMATION_SCHEMA.KEY_COLUMN_USAGE U
      INNER JOIN INFORMATION_SCHEMA.TABLE_CONSTRAINTS C
         ON U.CONSTRAINT_NAME = C.CONSTRAINT_NAME
WHERE
   C.CONSTRAINT_TYPE = 'FOREIGN KEY'

UPDATE @table SET
   T.PrimaryKeyConstraintName = R.UNIQUE_CONSTRAINT_NAME,
   T.UpdateRule = R.UPDATE_RULE,
   T.DeleteRule = R.DELETE_RULE
FROM 
   @table T
      INNER JOIN INFORMATION_SCHEMA.REFERENTIAL_CONSTRAINTS R
         ON T.ForeignKeyConstraintName = R.CONSTRAINT_NAME

UPDATE @table SET
   PrimaryKeyConstraintTableSchema  = TABLE_SCHEMA,
   PrimaryKeyConstraintTableName  = TABLE_NAME
FROM @table T
   INNER JOIN INFORMATION_SCHEMA.TABLE_CONSTRAINTS C
      ON T.PrimaryKeyConstraintName = C.CONSTRAINT_NAME

UPDATE @table SET
   PrimaryKeyConstraintColumnName = COLUMN_NAME
FROM @table T
   INNER JOIN INFORMATION_SCHEMA.KEY_COLUMN_USAGE U
      ON T.PrimaryKeyConstraintName = U.CONSTRAINT_NAME

--SELECT * FROM @table

SELECT '
BEGIN TRANSACTION
BEGIN TRY'

--DROP CONSTRAINT:
SELECT
   '
 ALTER TABLE [' + ForeignKeyConstraintTableSchema + '].[' + ForeignKeyConstraintTableName + '] 
 DROP CONSTRAINT ' + ForeignKeyConstraintName + '
   '
FROM
   @table

SELECT '
END TRY

BEGIN CATCH
   ROLLBACK TRANSACTION
   RAISERROR(''Operation failed.'', 16, 1)
END CATCH

IF(@@TRANCOUNT != 0)
BEGIN
   COMMIT TRANSACTION
   RAISERROR(''Operation completed successfully.'', 10, 1)
END
'

--ADD CONSTRAINT:
SELECT '
BEGIN TRANSACTION
BEGIN TRY'

SELECT
   '
   ALTER TABLE [' + ForeignKeyConstraintTableSchema + '].[' + ForeignKeyConstraintTableName + '] 
   ADD CONSTRAINT ' + ForeignKeyConstraintName + ' FOREIGN KEY(' + ForeignKeyConstraintColumnName + ') REFERENCES [' + PrimaryKeyConstraintTableSchema + '].[' + PrimaryKeyConstraintTableName + '](' + PrimaryKeyConstraintColumnName + ') ON UPDATE ' + UpdateRule + ' ON DELETE ' + DeleteRule + '
   '
FROM
   @table

SELECT '
END TRY

BEGIN CATCH
   ROLLBACK TRANSACTION
   RAISERROR(''Operation failed.'', 16, 1)
END CATCH

IF(@@TRANCOUNT != 0)
BEGIN
   COMMIT TRANSACTION
   RAISERROR(''Operation completed successfully.'', 10, 1)
END'

GO
share|improve this answer

I use this script to check constraint status. it's very helpfull

    SELECT (CASE 
        WHEN OBJECTPROPERTY(CONSTID, 'CNSTISDISABLED') = 0 THEN 'ENABLED'
        ELSE 'DISABLED'
        END) AS STATUS,
        OBJECT_NAME(CONSTID) AS CONSTRAINT_NAME,
        OBJECT_NAME(FKEYID) AS TABLE_NAME,
        COL_NAME(FKEYID, FKEY) AS COLUMN_NAME,
        OBJECT_NAME(RKEYID) AS REFERENCED_TABLE_NAME,
        COL_NAME(RKEYID, RKEY) AS REFERENCED_COLUMN_NAME
   FROM SYSFOREIGNKEYS
ORDER BY TABLE_NAME, CONSTRAINT_NAME,REFERENCED_TABLE_NAME, KEYNO 
share|improve this answer

Find the constraint

SELECT * 
FROM sys.foreign_keys
WHERE referenced_object_id = object_id('TABLE_NAME')

Execute the SQL generated by this SQL

SELECT 
    'ALTER TABLE ' +  OBJECT_SCHEMA_NAME(parent_object_id) +
    '.[' + OBJECT_NAME(parent_object_id) + 
    '] DROP CONSTRAINT ' + name
FROM sys.foreign_keys
WHERE referenced_object_id = object_id('TABLE_NAME')

Safeway.

Note: Added solution for droping the constraint so that table can be dropped or modified without any constraint error.

share|improve this answer

First post :)

For the OP, kristof's solution will work, unless there are issues with massive data and transaction log balloon issues on big deletes. Also, even with tlog storage to spare, since deletes write to the tlog, the operation can take a VERY long time for tables with hundreds of millions of rows.

I use a series of cursors to truncate and reload large copies of one of our huge production databases frequently. The solution engineered accounts for multiple schemas, multiple foreign key columns, and best of all can be sproc'd out for use in SSIS.

It involves creation of three staging tables (real tables) to house the DROP, CREATE, and CHECK FK scripts, creation and insertion of those scripts into the tables, and then looping over the tables and executing them. The attached script is four parts: 1.) creation and storage of the scripts in the three staging (real) tables, 2.) execution of the drop FK scripts via a cursor one by one, 3.) Using sp_MSforeachtable to truncate all the tables in the database other than our three staging tables and 4.) execution of the create FK and check FK scripts at the end of your ETL SSIS package.

Run the script creation portion in an Execute SQL task in SSIS. Run the "execute Drop FK Scripts" portion in a second Execute SQL task. Put the truncation script in a third Execute SQL task, then perform whatever other ETL processes you need to do prior to attaching the CREATE and CHECK scripts in a final Execute SQL task (or two if desired) at the end of your control flow.

Storage of the scripts in real tables has proven invaluable when the re-application of the foreign keys fails as you can select * from sync_CreateFK, copy/paste into your query window, run them one at a time, and fix the data issues once you find ones that failed/are still failing to re-apply.

Do not re-run the script again if it fails without making sure that you re-apply all of the foreign keys/checks prior to doing so, or you will most likely lose some creation and check fk scripting as our staging tables are dropped and recreated prior to the creation of the scripts to execute.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------
1)
/*
Author:         Denmach
DateCreated:    2014-04-23
Purpose:        Generates SQL statements to DROP, ADD, and CHECK existing constraints for a 
                database.  Stores scripts in tables on target database for execution.  Executes
                those stored scripts via independent cursors. 
DateModified:
ModifiedBy
Comments:       This will eliminate deletes and the T-log ballooning associated with it.
*/

DECLARE @schema_name SYSNAME; 
DECLARE @table_name SYSNAME; 
DECLARE @constraint_name SYSNAME; 
DECLARE @constraint_object_id INT; 
DECLARE @referenced_object_name SYSNAME; 
DECLARE @is_disabled BIT; 
DECLARE @is_not_for_replication BIT; 
DECLARE @is_not_trusted BIT; 
DECLARE @delete_referential_action TINYINT; 
DECLARE @update_referential_action TINYINT; 
DECLARE @tsql NVARCHAR(4000); 
DECLARE @tsql2 NVARCHAR(4000); 
DECLARE @fkCol SYSNAME; 
DECLARE @pkCol SYSNAME; 
DECLARE @col1 BIT; 
DECLARE @action CHAR(6);  
DECLARE @referenced_schema_name SYSNAME;



--------------------------------Generate scripts to drop all foreign keys in a database --------------------------------

IF OBJECT_ID('dbo.sync_dropFK') IS NOT NULL
DROP TABLE sync_dropFK

CREATE TABLE sync_dropFK
    (
    ID INT IDENTITY (1,1) NOT NULL
    , Script NVARCHAR(4000)
    )

DECLARE FKcursor CURSOR FOR

    SELECT 
        OBJECT_SCHEMA_NAME(parent_object_id)
        , OBJECT_NAME(parent_object_id)
        , name
    FROM 
        sys.foreign_keys WITH (NOLOCK)
    ORDER BY 
        1,2;

OPEN FKcursor;

FETCH NEXT FROM FKcursor INTO 
    @schema_name
    , @table_name
    , @constraint_name

WHILE @@FETCH_STATUS = 0

BEGIN
        SET @tsql = 'ALTER TABLE '
                + QUOTENAME(@schema_name) 
                + '.' 
                + QUOTENAME(@table_name)
                + ' DROP CONSTRAINT ' 
                + QUOTENAME(@constraint_name) 
                + ';';
    --PRINT @tsql;
    INSERT sync_dropFK  (
                        Script
                        )
                        VALUES (
                                @tsql
                                )   

    FETCH NEXT FROM FKcursor INTO 
    @schema_name
    , @table_name
    , @constraint_name
    ;

END;

CLOSE FKcursor;

DEALLOCATE FKcursor;


---------------Generate scripts to create all existing foreign keys in a database --------------------------------
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
IF OBJECT_ID('dbo.sync_createFK') IS NOT NULL
DROP TABLE sync_createFK

CREATE TABLE sync_createFK
    (
    ID INT IDENTITY (1,1) NOT NULL
    , Script NVARCHAR(4000)
    )

IF OBJECT_ID('dbo.sync_createCHECK') IS NOT NULL
DROP TABLE sync_createCHECK

CREATE TABLE sync_createCHECK
    (
    ID INT IDENTITY (1,1) NOT NULL
    , Script NVARCHAR(4000)
    )   

DECLARE FKcursor CURSOR FOR

     SELECT 
        OBJECT_SCHEMA_NAME(parent_object_id)
        , OBJECT_NAME(parent_object_id)
        , name
        , OBJECT_NAME(referenced_object_id)
        , OBJECT_ID
        , is_disabled
        , is_not_for_replication
        , is_not_trusted
        , delete_referential_action
        , update_referential_action
        , OBJECT_SCHEMA_NAME(referenced_object_id)

    FROM 
        sys.foreign_keys WITH (NOLOCK)

    ORDER BY 
        1,2;

OPEN FKcursor;

FETCH NEXT FROM FKcursor INTO 
    @schema_name
    , @table_name
    , @constraint_name
    , @referenced_object_name
    , @constraint_object_id
    , @is_disabled
    , @is_not_for_replication
    , @is_not_trusted
    , @delete_referential_action
    , @update_referential_action
    , @referenced_schema_name;

WHILE @@FETCH_STATUS = 0

BEGIN

        BEGIN
            SET @tsql = 'ALTER TABLE '
                        + QUOTENAME(@schema_name) 
                        + '.' 
                        + QUOTENAME(@table_name)
                        +   CASE 
                                @is_not_trusted
                                WHEN 0 THEN ' WITH CHECK '
                                ELSE ' WITH NOCHECK '
                            END
                        + ' ADD CONSTRAINT ' 
                        + QUOTENAME(@constraint_name)
                        + ' FOREIGN KEY (';

        SET @tsql2 = '';

        DECLARE ColumnCursor CURSOR FOR 

            SELECT 
                COL_NAME(fk.parent_object_id
                , fkc.parent_column_id)
                , COL_NAME(fk.referenced_object_id
                , fkc.referenced_column_id)

            FROM 
                sys.foreign_keys fk WITH (NOLOCK)
                INNER JOIN sys.foreign_key_columns fkc WITH (NOLOCK) ON fk.[object_id] = fkc.constraint_object_id

            WHERE 
                fkc.constraint_object_id = @constraint_object_id

            ORDER BY 
                fkc.constraint_column_id;

        OPEN ColumnCursor;

        SET @col1 = 1;

        FETCH NEXT FROM ColumnCursor INTO @fkCol, @pkCol;

        WHILE @@FETCH_STATUS = 0

        BEGIN
            IF (@col1 = 1)
                SET @col1 = 0;
            ELSE
            BEGIN
                SET @tsql = @tsql + ',';
                SET @tsql2 = @tsql2 + ',';
            END;

            SET @tsql = @tsql + QUOTENAME(@fkCol);
            SET @tsql2 = @tsql2 + QUOTENAME(@pkCol);
            --PRINT '@tsql = ' + @tsql 
            --PRINT '@tsql2 = ' + @tsql2
            FETCH NEXT FROM ColumnCursor INTO @fkCol, @pkCol;
            --PRINT 'FK Column ' + @fkCol
            --PRINT 'PK Column ' + @pkCol 
        END;

        CLOSE ColumnCursor;
        DEALLOCATE ColumnCursor;

        SET @tsql = @tsql + ' ) REFERENCES ' 
                    + QUOTENAME(@referenced_schema_name) 
                    + '.' 
                    + QUOTENAME(@referenced_object_name)
                    + ' (' 
                    + @tsql2 + ')';

        SET @tsql = @tsql
                    + ' ON UPDATE ' 
                    + 
                        CASE @update_referential_action
                            WHEN 0 THEN 'NO ACTION '
                            WHEN 1 THEN 'CASCADE '
                            WHEN 2 THEN 'SET NULL '
                                ELSE 'SET DEFAULT '
                        END

                    + ' ON DELETE ' 
                    + 
                        CASE @delete_referential_action
                            WHEN 0 THEN 'NO ACTION '
                            WHEN 1 THEN 'CASCADE '
                            WHEN 2 THEN 'SET NULL '
                                ELSE 'SET DEFAULT '
                        END

                    + 
                    CASE @is_not_for_replication
                        WHEN 1 THEN ' NOT FOR REPLICATION '
                            ELSE ''
                    END
                    + ';';

        END;

    --  PRINT @tsql
        INSERT sync_createFK    
                        (
                        Script
                        )
                        VALUES (
                                @tsql
                                )

-------------------Generate CHECK CONSTRAINT scripts for a database ------------------------------
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

        BEGIN

        SET @tsql = 'ALTER TABLE '
                    + QUOTENAME(@schema_name) 
                    + '.' 
                    + QUOTENAME(@table_name)
                    + 
                        CASE @is_disabled
                            WHEN 0 THEN ' CHECK '
                                ELSE ' NOCHECK '
                        END
                    + 'CONSTRAINT ' 
                    + QUOTENAME(@constraint_name)
                    + ';';
        --PRINT @tsql;
        INSERT sync_createCHECK 
                        (
                        Script
                        )
                        VALUES (
                                @tsql
                                )   
        END;

    FETCH NEXT FROM FKcursor INTO 
    @schema_name
    , @table_name
    , @constraint_name
    , @referenced_object_name
    , @constraint_object_id
    , @is_disabled
    , @is_not_for_replication
    , @is_not_trusted
    , @delete_referential_action
    , @update_referential_action
    , @referenced_schema_name;

END;

CLOSE FKcursor;

DEALLOCATE FKcursor;

--SELECT * FROM sync_DropFK
--SELECT * FROM sync_CreateFK
--SELECT * FROM sync_CreateCHECK
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
2.)
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
----------------------------execute Drop FK Scripts --------------------------------------------------

DECLARE @scriptD NVARCHAR(4000)

DECLARE DropFKCursor CURSOR FOR
    SELECT Script 
    FROM sync_dropFK WITH (NOLOCK)

OPEN DropFKCursor

FETCH NEXT FROM DropFKCursor
INTO @scriptD

WHILE @@FETCH_STATUS = 0
BEGIN
--PRINT @scriptD
EXEC (@scriptD)
FETCH NEXT FROM DropFKCursor
INTO @scriptD
END
CLOSE DropFKCursor
DEALLOCATE DropFKCursor
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
3.) 

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
----------------------------Truncate all tables in the database other than our staging tables --------------------
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


EXEC sp_MSforeachtable 'IF OBJECT_ID(''?'') NOT IN 
(
ISNULL(OBJECT_ID(''dbo.sync_createCHECK''),0),
ISNULL(OBJECT_ID(''dbo.sync_createFK''),0),
ISNULL(OBJECT_ID(''dbo.sync_dropFK''),0)
)
BEGIN TRY
 TRUNCATE TABLE ?
END TRY
BEGIN CATCH
 PRINT ''Truncation failed on''+ ? +''
END CATCH;' 
GO
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
----------------------------execute Create FK Scripts and CHECK CONSTRAINT Scripts---------------
----------------------------tack me at the end of the ETL in a SQL task-------------------------
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
DECLARE @scriptC NVARCHAR(4000)

DECLARE CreateFKCursor CURSOR FOR
    SELECT Script 
    FROM sync_createFK WITH (NOLOCK)

OPEN CreateFKCursor

FETCH NEXT FROM CreateFKCursor
INTO @scriptC

WHILE @@FETCH_STATUS = 0
BEGIN
--PRINT @scriptC
EXEC (@scriptC)
FETCH NEXT FROM CreateFKCursor
INTO @scriptC
END
CLOSE CreateFKCursor
DEALLOCATE CreateFKCursor
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
DECLARE @scriptCh NVARCHAR(4000)

DECLARE CreateCHECKCursor CURSOR FOR
    SELECT Script 
    FROM sync_createCHECK WITH (NOLOCK)

OPEN CreateCHECKCursor

FETCH NEXT FROM CreateCHECKCursor
INTO @scriptCh

WHILE @@FETCH_STATUS = 0
BEGIN
--PRINT @scriptCh
EXEC (@scriptCh)
FETCH NEXT FROM CreateCHECKCursor
INTO @scriptCh
END
CLOSE CreateCHECKCursor
DEALLOCATE CreateCHECKCursor
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