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I was implementing a form that includes a hardcoded dropdown for a collection and I was wondering what would be the best solution, I know both ways exposed below work, still I did as follows:

class Example

  # Options for Example.
  self.options
    [ 'Yes', 'No', 'Not sure' ]
  end
end

which is called by Example.options, but I know it is possible to do as follows as well:

class Example

  # Options for Example.
  OPTIONS = [ 'Yes', 'No', 'Not sure' ]
end

that would be called with Example::OPTIONS.

The question is, is any of these the good way or it just doesn't matter at all?

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The generally accepted approach is the latter as the Upercase with the comments is a form of documentation to the user that this is a constant –  ilan berci Apr 9 '13 at 13:56
2  
Unrelated to a possible answer, I would suggest using symbols over strings unless your code specifically needs strings. Hence [:yes, :no, :not_sure] –  Charles Caldwell Apr 9 '13 at 14:01

2 Answers 2

up vote 16 down vote accepted

The latter is better. If it were a method, a new array and new strings will be created every time it is called, which is a waste of resource.

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Nice one there! Thanks :) –  Genís Apr 9 '13 at 14:03
    
Fantastic, +10, if I could ;-) –  Anand Apr 9 '13 at 14:04
    
+1 Also calling Example.methods will tell options is a method, when you know is a class constant. It's another tip for making consistent code. –  nicooga Apr 9 '13 at 14:43
1  
It is easy to cache the array in the method though... @options ||= [...] –  Marc-André Lafortune Apr 9 '13 at 16:43
    
Wrote another answer, since I disagree that the constant is the better approach. –  Marc-André Lafortune Apr 9 '13 at 16:49

TL;DR: It depends. Are the values meant to be used outside the class? Could they ever become dynamic? Could they change for subclasses?

As @sawa wrote, the downside of the method (written this way) is that a new array and strings are created each time.

A better way to write it would be:

class Example
  def self.options
    @options ||= ['Yes', 'No', 'Not sure']
  end
end

The array is stored in the instance variable @options, to avoid creating a new array each time.

Written this way, the method is very similar to the constant.

One key difference is if Example is subclassed, it will be more natural to refine the options method than the constant OPTIONS:

class Parent < Example
  def self.options
    @options ||= [*super, 'Extra']
  end
end

To do something similar with constants is difficult. Imagine that your list of options is used in a class method, this would look like:

class Example
  OPTIONS = ['Yes', 'No', 'Not sure']

  def self.foo(arg)
     puts "Available options:",
          self::OPTIONS  # The self:: is needed here
     # ...
  end
end

class Parent < Example
  OPTIONS = [*superclass::OPTIONS, 'Extra']
end

The tricky thing about constants, is that self::OPTIONS and OPTIONS are not the always same, while self.options and options are the same. Constants are usually used without specifying the scope (e.g. OPTIONS instead of self::OPTIONS) and inheritance will simply not work in that case.

Note that the method gives you the opportunity to make the result dynamic (i.e. return different results depending on other circumstances) without changing the API.

Final note: I'd recommend calling freeze on your array, to avoid anyone modifying it.

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You can still do a similar thing with constants: Example::Options = ["Yes", "No", "Not sure"]; Parent::Options = [*Example::Options, "Extra"]. The only difference is that you have to explicitly write the parent class instead of using super. –  sawa Apr 9 '13 at 17:16
1  
@sawa: Indeed, you can (and you can use superclass instead of explicitly writing the parent class), but accessing the constants can be tricky. Edited my answer. –  Marc-André Lafortune Apr 9 '13 at 17:27
    
The relevant idea in the question was to directly call the constant like Example::OPTIONS or Parent::OPTIONS, or OPTIONS. I don't get why you are defining self.foo to call them. –  sawa Apr 9 '13 at 17:41
    
It's meant as an example of a class method using options/OPTIONS. –  Marc-André Lafortune Apr 9 '13 at 17:46

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