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I'm writing a vim script where I need to get the first line of the current buffer. In Ex mode I can simply type 1 and it shows me the content I want. How can I put the output of the ex command into a variable in vim?

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Thank you for posting your motivation in addition to your problem; you've successfully avoided the XY problem. – Ingo Karkat Apr 9 '13 at 14:33
up vote 1 down vote accepted

The expression you want is getline(1). Thus, let x = getline(1).

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Chris's answer is the right approach.

Note however, that you can use the :redir command to capture the output of an Ex command into a variable:

:let myvar = ""
:redir => myvar
:command
:redir END

See :h :redir for more information.

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By ex mode I don't mean command mode of vim. I meant the mode when you press Q or gQ :) – Jesse Apr 9 '13 at 15:31
    
Yes, I know what "Ex mode" is, what do you mean by "ex command", then? – romainl Apr 9 '13 at 18:55
    
In normal mode, press Q or gQ in vim. It will open the ex mode. There you'll have a different functionality – Jesse Apr 9 '13 at 19:02
    
I know how Ex mode works, thanks. And I know what "ex command" means. You asked "How can I put the output of the ex command into a variable in vim?" don't you? That's exactly what I explained. Did you even try my suggestion? Also the purpose of :1 is not to output the current line or even line 1, its purpose is to move to line 1. The content of the line is printed out to provide feedback. :1p is the command you should use if you want to print out the content of line 1 and :redir => abc is the command you need if you want to put that output into variable abc. – romainl Apr 9 '13 at 20:12

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