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One thing I've been a little confused about is the differences between parens and brackets in clojure require statements. I was wondering if someone could explain this to me. For example, these do the same thing:

(ns sample.core
  (:gen-class)
  (:require clojure.set clojure.string))

and

 (ns sample.core
  (:gen-class)
  (:require [clojure.set] 
            [clojure.string]))

However, this works from the repl

(require 'clojure.string 'clojure.test)

But fails in a clj file

(ns sample.core
  (:gen-class)
  (:require 'clojure.string 'clojure.test))
...
Exception in thread "main" java.lang.Exception: lib names inside prefix lists must not contain periods
    at clojure.core$load_lib.doInvoke(core.clj:5359)
    at clojure.lang.RestFn.applyTo(RestFn.java:142)
    ....

Whereas these apear to do the same thing:

(ns sample.core
  (:gen-class)
  (require clojure.set clojure.string))

(ns sample.core
  (:gen-class)
  (:require clojure.set clojure.string))

In general I'm not understanding this. I understand use, import and require. But I do not understand the ":" and the differences between things in [] and '() etc. Can anyone illuminate this topic in an intuitive way?

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1  
Hm, doesn't really ask about the []'s and the differences between the repl and clj code. –  David Williams Apr 9 '13 at 15:07

2 Answers 2

up vote 12 down vote accepted

The issue here is subtle and possibly difficult to grok without first understanding a bit about macros.

Macros manipulate syntax in the same way that functions manipulate values. In fact, macros are just functions with a hook that causes them to be evaluated at compile time. They are passed the data literal that you see in the source code and are evaluated top-down. Let's make a function and a macro that have the same body so you can see the difference:

(defmacro print-args-m [& args]
  (print "Your args:")
  (prn args))

(defn print-args-f [& args]
  (print "Your args:")
  (prn args))

(print-args-m (+ 1 2) (str "hello" " sir!"))

; Your args: ((+ 1 2) (str "hello" " sir!"))

(print-args-f (+ 1 2) (str "hello" " sir!"))

; Your args: (3 "hello sir!")

Macros are replaced by their return value. You can inspect this process with macroexpand

(defmacro defmap [sym & args]
  `(def ~sym (hash-map ~@args))) ; I won't explain these crazy symbols here.
                                 ; There are plenty of good tutorials around

(macroexpand
  '(defmap people
     "Steve" {:age 53, :gender :male}
     "Agnes" {:age 7,  :gender :female}))

;  (def people
;    (clojure.core/hash-map
;      "Steve" {:age 53, :gender :male}
;      "Agnes" {:age 7, :gender :female}))

At this point, I should probably explain that ' causes the following form to be quoted. This means that the compiler will read the form, but not execute it or try to resolve symbols and so forth. i.e. 'conj evaluates to a symbol, while conj evaluates to a function. (eval 'conj) is equivalent to (eval (quote conj)) is equivalent to conj.

With that in mind, know that you can't resolve a symbol as a namespace until it has been magically imported into your namespace somehow. This is what the require function does. It takes symbols and finds the namespaces they correspond to, making them available in the current namespace.

Let's see what the ns macro expands to:

(macroexpand
  '(ns sample.core
    (:require clojure.set clojure.string)))

;  (do
;    (clojure.core/in-ns 'sample.core)
;    (clojure.core/with-loading-context
;      (clojure.core/refer 'clojure.core)
;      (clojure.core/require 'clojure.set 'clojure.string)))

See how it quoted the symbols clojure.set and clojure.string for us? How convenient! But what's the deal when you use require in stead of :require?

(macroexpand
 '(ns sample.core
   (require clojure.set clojure.string)))

;  (do
;    (clojure.core/in-ns 'sample.core)
;    (clojure.core/with-loading-context
;      (clojure.core/refer 'clojure.core)
;      (clojure.core/require 'clojure.set 'clojure.string)))

It seems that whoever wrote the ns macro was nice enough to let us do it both ways, since this result is exactly the same as before. Neato!

edit: tvachon is right about only using :require since it is the only officially supported form

But what's the deal with brackets?

(macroexpand
  '(ns sample.core
    (:require [clojure.set] 
              [clojure.string])))

; (do
;  (clojure.core/in-ns 'sample.core)
;  (clojure.core/with-loading-context
;   (clojure.core/refer 'clojure.core)
;   (clojure.core/require '[clojure.set] '[clojure.string])))

Turns out they get quoted too, just like we'd do if we were writing standalone calls to require.

It also turns out that ns doesn't care whether we give it lists (parens) or vectors (brackets) to work with. It just sees the arguments as sequences of things. For example, this works:

(ns sample.core
  [:gen-class]
  [:require [clojure.set]
            [clojure.string]])

require, as pointed out by amalloy in the comments, has different semantics for vectors and lists, so don't mix those up!

Finally, why doesn't the following work?

(ns sample.core
  (:require 'clojure.string 'clojure.test))

Well, since ns does our quoting for us, these symbols get quoted twice, which is semantically different from being quoted only once and is also pure craziness.

conj    ; => #<core$conj clojure.core$conj@d62a05c>
'conj   ; => conj 
''conj  ; => (quote conj)
'''conj ; => (quote (quote conj))

I hope this helps, and I definitely recommend learning how to write macros. They're super fun.

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2  
(:require (clojure.set) (clojure.string)) doesn't work at all. It is a no-op, which happens to look like it works because you chose two namespaces which are already required. Try it on some non-existent namespaces: it succeeds silently; on extant namespaces it silently does nothing. Using parens here indicates a prefix list, as in (:require (clojure set string)); the syntax you gave works only with vectors. –  amalloy Apr 9 '13 at 18:43
    
Well spotted. I'll edit the post to reflect. –  d.j.sheldrick Apr 9 '13 at 20:01
    
great answer, and +1 for TDT reference, if that's what it was –  Hendekagon Apr 10 '13 at 0:10
    
DJ, why does this work: (ns image-test.core (:gen-class) (:require (png-extract) [clojure.string :as string])) but this fails: (ns image-test.core (:gen-class) (:require [png-extract] [clojure.string :as string])) –  David Williams Apr 19 '13 at 20:41

TL;DR:

(ns sample.core
  (:gen-class)
  (:require clojure.set clojure.string))

and

 (ns sample.core
  (:gen-class)
  (:require [clojure.set] 
            [clojure.string]))

are both fine - the second version is just a special case of the most flexible syntax require supports. This could also be written as:

 (ns sample.core
  (:gen-class)
  (:require [clojure set string]))

In general, this last form is best practice for this particular require.


(require 'clojure.string 'clojure.test)

Also works in a clj file - try this:

(ns sample.core
  (:gen-class))
(require 'clojure.string 'clojure.test)

The confusion here is that in your broken example you're trying to use "quoted symbols" in the :require clause of the ns macro. That's probably not the most intuitive explanation, but here's how it breaks down:

There are two ways to require other modules, require and ns.

require is a function that takes a list of quoted forms (the "quoting" is needed to avoid having clojure look up the symbols you pass to require the way it does all other symbols).

ns is a macro that supports a :require option. It takes the value of this option and, under the covers, transforms it into a call to the require function. You don't need to quote the value of the :require option because ns is a macro and is therefore capable of quoting the symbols itself.

That might still be unclear, but I'd suggest turning to the Clojure documentation to clarify - once you fully understand all that you'll have a much better understanding of Clojure in general.

In Clojure source files you should always use an ns clause to require libraries - require should only be used in the REPL.


In your last two examples you're correct that

(ns sample.core
  (:gen-class)
  (require clojure.set clojure.string))

works, but this is an accident - probably a result of the fact that

(name :require)
=> "require"

(name 'require)
=> "require"

The documented syntax is

(ns sample.core
  (:gen-class)
  (:require clojure.set clojure.string))

and is the only one guaranteed not to break in the future.

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"In Clojure source files you should always use an ns clause to require libraries - require should only be used in the REPL." Why? –  Daniel Kaplan Apr 9 '13 at 16:50
2  
No technical reason - entirely one of style and readability. Using ns consistently ensures other programmers can easily see what namespaces are required by a file without digging through the whole file. It's also a little cleaner, since you don't need to escape forms manually. –  tvachon Apr 9 '13 at 17:35

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