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I'm looking for an efficient way to obtain a list of String tokens extracted from multiple Strings (e.g. with a whitespace separator).

Example:

String s1 = "My mom cook everyday";
String s2 = "I eat everyday";
String s3 = "Am I fat?";  
LinkedList<String> tokens = new LinkedList<String>();   
//any code to efficiently get the tokens

//final result is tokens  make of a list of the following tokens:
//"My", "mom", "cook", "everyday", "I", "eat", "everyday", "Am", "I", "fat?".

Now

  1. I'm not sure that LinkedList is the most effective collection class to be used (Apache Commons, Guava, may they help?)!
  2. I was going to use StringUtils from Apache Commons, but the split method returns an array! So, I should extract with a for cycle the Strings from the array of String objects returned by split. Is that efficient: I don't know, split creates an array!
  3. I read about Splitter from Guava, but this post states that StringUtils is better in practice.
  4. What about Scanner from Java.util. It seems to not allocate any additional data structures. Isn't it?

Please, draw the most efficient Java solution, even by using additional widely used library, like Guava and Apache Commons.

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1  
About #3 - the post you're citing states the opposite: In conclusion I think I'll still use Splitter most of the time. On small lists the difference in performance is going to be negligible, and Splitter just feels much nicer to use. Still I was surprised by the result, and if you're splitting lots of Strings and performance is an issue, it might be worth considering switching back to Commons StringUtils. Plus, Splitter is much, much more powerful than String#split or Apache Commons solution. –  Xaerxess Apr 9 '13 at 14:57
1  
Why so much interest in optimizing? –  Paul Vargas Apr 9 '13 at 14:59
    
@PaulVargas Because I have thousands strings to be tokenized from large texts. –  mat_boy Apr 9 '13 at 15:01
    
@Xaerxess I read the post: it doesn't state the opposite. He concludes that "if you're splitting lots of Strings and performance is an issue, it might be worth considering switching back to Commons StringUtils". I'm aiming to this... –  mat_boy Apr 9 '13 at 15:04
    
Did you mean read large files of text? –  Paul Vargas Apr 9 '13 at 15:07

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

If you have small Strings and performance isn't an issue, you can just combine split with addAll like this:

String s1 = "My mom cook everyday";
String s2 = "I eat everyday";
String s3 = "Am I fat?";  
List<String> tokens = new ArrayList<String>();  

tokens.addAll(Arrays.asList(s1.split("\\s+")));
tokens.addAll(Arrays.asList(s2.split("\\s+")));
tokens.addAll(Arrays.asList(s3.split("\\s+")));

System.out.println(tokens);

However if performance is an issue here's an alternative solution:

Since there is no definition in how these long texts are acquired, I'll assume they come in an InputStream. See if this method is performatic enough to fit your needs:

public List<String> readTokens(InputStream is) throws IOException{
    Reader reader = new InputStreamReader(is);
    List<String> tokens = new ArrayList<String>();
    BufferedReader bufferedReader = new BufferedReader(reader);
    String line = null;
    while((line = bufferedReader.readLine()) != null){
        String[] lineTokens = StringUtils.split(line, " "); 
        for(int i = 0 ; i < lineTokens.length ; i++){
            tokens.add(lineTokens[i]);
        }
    }
    return tokens;
}

And as to your statement regarding ArrayList vs LinkedList for inserting at the end, perhaps you should read this

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I read that split from String is not a really effective solution. This is why, for instance, Apache Commons comes with StringUtils.split! Maybe because it use patterns... –  mat_boy Apr 9 '13 at 14:53
    
Are your Strings really that large? Because you shouldn't worry about performance where it isn't an issue –  Rodrigo Sasaki Apr 9 '13 at 14:56
1  
Moreover, ArrayList is not efficient as LinkedList when the number of elements to be inserted is high! In fact, ArrayList is just a "wrapper" for an array, it comes with a default sized array and once you exceed the default size you have to create a new array and to copy the old values into the newer! Very uneffective! –  mat_boy Apr 9 '13 at 14:57
    
Uneffective is a very subjective term. You need to state your needs of performance and your requirements. My answer was based on your example. And for what you have stated, my answer is very effective. Perhaps a more real example would help us draw a better solution –  Rodrigo Sasaki Apr 9 '13 at 15:01
1  
@mat_boy: "Very uneffective!" It may sound inefficient, but in practice, it's frequently still more efficient than LinkedList. It's still linear time overall, and copying one array to another array is actually blazing fast when it's done with tools like memcpy (which is how Java does it under the covers). The extra indirections involved with LinkedList can be expensive. –  Louis Wasserman Apr 9 '13 at 15:43
for (String str : Arrays.asList(s1, s2, s3)) {
  Iterables.addAll(tokens, Splitter.on(' ').split(str));
}

would be the way I'd do it. That said, ArrayList is preferable to LinkedList for almost all use cases; without further data, we really can't tell whether or not you're in one of those rare cases where LinkedList is preferable.

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I'm doing some test... –  mat_boy Apr 9 '13 at 15:32

or just Arrays.asList((s1 + " " + s2 + " " + s3).split("\\s+"))

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First join your strings using your separator (see Join a string using delimiters). Then:

 LinkedList<String> tokens = new LinkedList<String>();
 StringTokenizer st = new StringTokenizer(yourstr); // " " as a default delimiter
 while (st.hasMoreTokens()) {
     tokens.add(st.nextToken());
 }

Are you looking for an efficient or performant solution (i.e. what is your constraints/reference performance)?

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     import java.util.ArrayList;
     import java.util.Collections;


    public class stringintotoken {
String s="my name is tarun bharti";
ArrayList <String> words=new ArrayList<String>();
public static void main(String[] args)
{
    stringintotoken st=new stringintotoken();
    st.go();
}
public void go()
{
    wordlist();
    System.out.println(words);
    Collections.sort(words);
    System.out.println(words);

}
public void wordlist()
{
    String[] tokens=s.split(" ");
    for(int i=0;i<tokens.length;i++)
    {
    words.add(tokens[i]);
    }
}

}

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