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I have the following class;

    abstract class People
    {
    string name;
    bool disabled;
    string hometown;

    Hometown referenceToHometown;


    // default constructor
    public People()
    {
        name = "";
        disabled = false;
        hometown = "";
    }

I would like to add data to it, to display at a later time on form - After research I have this, but am getting a few errors "Invalid token '=' "

namespace peoplePlaces
{
public partial class frm_people : Form
{
        List<People> people = new List<People>();

        People data = new ();
        data.name = "James";
        data.disabled = false;
        data.hometown = "Cardiff"

        people.Add(data);
}

}

Is this there a neater way to add data to a class? and In doing so could a form be made to cycle through records?

Any help would be greatly appreciated on this!

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4  
Your class is abstract. You can't instantiate it. Also, you're missing a semicolon. –  voithos Apr 9 '13 at 15:18
1  
Also, your missing the type to instantiate after new –  Rik Apr 9 '13 at 15:18
2  
But what the error message is pointing to is that you're trying to instantiate objects and call methods in the body of a class. You cannot do this; class bodies are for definitions (e.g. fields, methods). –  voithos Apr 9 '13 at 15:19
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Revised code for what you're trying to do:

public class People
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public bool Disabled { get; set; }
    public string Hometown { get; set; }

    Hometown referenceToHometown;


// default constructor
public People()
{
    name = "";
    disabled = false;
    hometown = "";
}

public People(string name, bool disabled, string hometown)
{
    this.Name = name;
    this.Disabled = disabled;
    this.Hometown = hometown
}

And your page code:

namespace peoplePlaces
{
   public partial class frm_people : Form
   {
        // This has to happen in the load event of the form, sticking in constructor for now, but this is bad practice.

        public frm_people()
        {
        List<People> people = new List<People>();

        People data = new Person("James", false, "Cardiff");

        // or

        People data1 = new Person { 
          Name = "James", 
          Disabled = false, 
          Hometown = "Cardiff"
        };

        people.Add(data);
        }
   }
}
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You can perform this kind of initialization using a static method:

public partial class frm_people : Form
{
    List<People> people = CreatePeople();

    private static List<People> CreatePeople()
    {
        var list = new List<People>();

        People data = new People();
        data.name = "James";
        data.disabled = false;
        data.hometown = "Cardiff";

        list.Add(data);

        return list;
    }
}

Of course, your People type will have to be made non-abstract, or you will have to create an instance of a non-abstract derived type; right now you cannot create an instance of People using new People(), since the class is marked abstract.

If you are using a modern enough C#, you can do this using only initialization constructs:

public partial class frm_people : Form
{
    List<People> people = new List<People>() {
        new People() {
            name = "James",
            disabled = false,
            hometown = "Cardiff"
        }
    };
}
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Your People class looks like this may be one of your first classes in C#. You should start small and only add feature as you need them:

class People
{
  string Name { get; set; }
  bool Disabled { get; set; }
  string Hometown { get; set; }
  Hometown ReferenceToHometown { get; set; }
}

You can then call it this way:

People data = new People() { Name = "James", Disabled = false, Hometown = "Cardiff" };

If you need abstract classes and constructors, you should add them when you need them.

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