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er have the following query in linq...

Whenever I try to run it I get a No comparison operator for type System.Int[] exception.

It's got something to do with the dictionary I am sure, but I don't understand why this isn't valid and was wondering if someone could explain?

// As requested... not sure it will help though.
var per = (
    from p in OtherContext.tblPeriod 
    where activeContractList.Select(c => c.DomainSetExtensionCode).Contains(p.DomainSetExtensionCode) 
    select p).ToArray();

var com = (
    from c in MyContext.tblService 
    join sce in MyContext.tblServiceExtension
    on c.ServiceExtensionCode equals sce.ServiceExtensionCode
    join sc in MyContext.tblServiceContract
    on sce.ServiceContractCode equals sc.ContractCode
    group sc by c.Period into comG
    select new
    {
        PeriodNumber = comG.Key,
        Group = comG,
    }).ToArray();

var code =
    (from c in com
    join p in per on c.PeriodNumber equals p.PeriodNumber
    select new
    {
        p.Code, 
        c.Group
    }).ToArray();

var payDictionary = new Dictionary<int, int[]>();

// This is another linq query that returns an anonymous type with
// two properties, and int and an array.
code.ForEach(c => payDictionary.Add(c.Code, c.Group.Select(g => g.Code).ToArray()));

// MyContext is a LINQ to SQL DataContext
var stuff = (
from
    p in MyContext.tblPaySomething
    join cae in MyContext.tblSomethingElse
    on p.PaymentCode equals cae.PaymentCode
    join ca in MyContext.tblAnotherThing
    on cae.SomeCode equals ca.SomeCode
where
    // ca.ContractCode.Value in an int?, that should always have a value.
    payDictionary[p.Code].Contains(ca.ContractCode.Value)
select new
{
    p.Code,
    p.ExtensionCode,
    p.IsFlagged,
    p.Narrative,
    p.PayCode,
    ca.BookCode,
    cae.Status
}).ToList();
share|improve this question
1  
Is ca.ContractCode.Value an int[]? –  David S. Apr 9 '13 at 15:23
2  
What is code? –  p.s.w.g Apr 9 '13 at 15:23
    
Can you include the definition for MyContext? –  Ryan Gates Apr 9 '13 at 15:25
    
Have added comments to help explain. –  tigerswithguitars Apr 9 '13 at 15:30
2  
Either "PaymentCode" or "SomeCode" is of type int[] (ie an array), not "int" as you appear to be assuming. –  Tormod Apr 9 '13 at 15:35

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You won't be able to do this with a dictionary. The alternative is to join the three linq queries into one. You can do this with minimal impact to your code by not materializing the queries with ToArray. This will leave com and code as IQueryable<T> and allow for you compose other queries with them.

You will also need to use a group rather than constructing a dictionary. Something like this should work:

var per = (
    from p in OtherContext.tblPeriod 
    where activeContractList.Select(c => c.DomainSetExtensionCode).Contains(p.DomainSetExtensionCode) 
    select p.PeriodNumber).ToArray(); // Leave this ToArray because it's materialized from OtherContext

var com = 
    from c in MyContext.tblService 
    join sce in MyContext.tblServiceExtension on c.ServiceExtensionCode equals sce.ServiceExtensionCode
    join sc in MyContext.tblServiceContract on sce.ServiceContractCode equals sc.ContractCode
    group sc by c.Period into comG
    select new
    {
        PeriodNumber = comG.Key,
        Group = comG,
    }; // no ToArray

var code =
    from c in com
    where per.Contains(c.PeriodNumber) // have to change this line because per comes from OtherContext
    select new
    {
        Code = c.PeriodNumber, 
        c.Group
    }; // no ToArray

var results = 
    (from p in MyContext.tblPaySomething
     join cae in MyContext.tblSomethingElse on p.PaymentCode equals cae.PaymentCode
     join ca in MyContext.tblAnothThing on cae.SomeCode equals ca.SomeCode
     join cg in MyContext.Codes.GroupBy(c => c.Code, c => c.Code) on cg.Key equals p.Code
     where cg.Contains(ca.ContractCode.Value)
     select new
     {
         p.ContractPeriodCode,
         p.DomainSetExtensionCode,
         p.IsFlagged,
         p.Narrative,
         p.PaymentCode,
         ca.BookingCode,
         cae.Status
     })
    .ToList();

Side Note: I also suggest using navigation properties where possible instead of joins. It makes it much easier to read and understand how objects are related and create complex queries.

share|improve this answer
    
Usually L2S or EF won't accept a single query using multiple contexts. So I would expect this not to work. –  Maarten Apr 9 '13 at 15:54
    
@Maarten I'm not using multiple contexts. Notice per is still materialized to an array. I've included a note in my answer to make that more clear. –  p.s.w.g Apr 9 '13 at 15:55
    
True, my mistake. Nevertheless you are using the result of one query as input for another where the data as something other than a list of value types (in this case an array of records from tblPeriod). I still think this won't work. Input for a query must be a value type, or a collection of it (enumerable). –  Maarten Apr 9 '13 at 16:04
    
@Maarten It will work if you don't materialize the result set, but leave it as an IQueryable<T>. This is a key feature of the design of LINQ. –  p.s.w.g Apr 9 '13 at 16:46
1  
@tigerswithguitars navigation properties allow you work with queries in a more succinct, intuitive, and semantic way. They way still be translated to joins in the underlying SQL call, but the idea is that you don't have to know that. I've included a link in my answer. –  p.s.w.g Apr 10 '13 at 13:17

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