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I have to do a peer-to-peer application on local network, basically a service which publishes files and another app on the local network consumes it.

My idea is to use WebAPI in the service and want to use SSL. Users will be installing both the apps locally. Is this a feasible solution? If so, I found this article but not sure how to get the certhash.

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Yes - it's a feasible solution.

Here's a quick overview of what's going on behind the scenes when you've got SSL (or TLS) in the mix: http://www.moserware.com/2009/06/first-few-milliseconds-of-https.html

Specifically, you'll get two benefits from using HTTPS: - Encryption - Trust (as in, IF you've got certificates that identify each end-point, then you'll be able to be 'sure' that your client apps are connecting to each other and not, presumably, some 'sneak' on a laptop in the lobby/etc.)

The problem, then, is just finding some decent docs on how to get this all set up (and determining WHERE you're going to get your certs from (if they're self-signed (i.e., without your own/corporate signing authority or without a trusted 3rd party authority), then you can LOSE the trust benefit listed above).

In terms of docs, the following resources seem to be quite decent (though I've only GLANCED at them): http://www.piotrwalat.net/client-certificate-authentication-in-asp-net-web-api-and-windows-store-apps/

http://woloski.com/2012/08/04/securing-aspnet-webapi-with-clientcerts/

And, it appears that Matias has even created a Nuget package that should make this all tons easier to set up: http://nuget.org/packages/Auth10.AspNet.WebApi.ClientCert/

(I need to check that out myself - as I've only glanced at it.)

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