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how to limit the scope of a static member to a n specific classes? for example if i create a1 object of class A and a2 object of class A, i want these objects(a1, a2 created with A) could have different values for their static member but the same for their corresponding derived classes.

  class A{
    public:
           A(int member){
               A::mMember=member;}
           void set(int member){
               A::mMember=member;}
           int get(){
               return A::mMember;}
        protected:
           static int mMember;
    };

    int A::mMember;

    class B:public A{
    public:
        B(int member):A(member){};
    };

    class C:public A{

        C(int member):A(member){};

    };

    int main()
    {   

      A * a1= new A(1);
         std::cout<<"a1: "<< a1->get()<<std::endl;
         B * b1= new B(2);
         std::cout<<"a1: "<< a1->get()<<std::endl;

         // How to make a1 continue be a1=2 and a2 = 5. I mean how to limit a static member     
         //to  only its derivated class
         A * a2 = new A(5);
         std::cout<<"a1: "<< a1->get()<<std::endl;
         std::cout<<"a2: "<< a2->get()<<std::endl;

    }
share|improve this question

closed as unclear what you're asking by Joachim Pileborg, ildjarn, Roger Rowland, Gregor Brandt, Kerrek SB Mar 3 '14 at 1:22

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
Please write a proper question. Don't put the whole of the question inside a single comment in a large chunk of code. –  Joachim Pileborg Apr 9 '13 at 15:57
    
Why don't you just use a non-static member variable? –  Daniel Frey Apr 9 '13 at 16:08
    
I have a map member in base class, when the derived class is constructed, the derive class assign the same id to a map because it inherits that member. –  user1310873 Apr 9 '13 at 16:13

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The whole point of a static member is that it's "one for everywhere" [not without limits, but let's ignore that for the purpose of this question].

In your example code it seems like you want b1 = B(2) to alter the A value, but a2 to have a new value for mMember. This is not possible using a static member.

To me, it seems like what you really want is either a factory function that knows when you need a new object and when you don't, and passes a reference to this object in the relevant constructor, or some sort of storage (through a static member function in A).

In the first case, that would look a bit like this:

class A
{
    public:
       A(int member, int &ref_member) : mref_member = ref_member
       {
           A::mMember=member;
       }
       void set(int member)
       {
           A::mMember=member;
       }
       int get(){
           return A::mMember;
       }
    protected:
       static int mMember;
};

int A::mMember;

class B : public A
{
    public:
        B(int member, int &ref_member) : A(member,ref_member)
        {
        };
};


A* maker(int v, bool needs_new_ref, char type)
{
     static int *ref = NULL;
     if (needs_new_ref || !ref)
     {
        ref = new int;
     } 
     switch(type)
     {
         case 'A':
             return new A(v, ref);
             break;
         case 'B':
             return new B(v, ref);
             break;
     }
 }

The second alternative involves a function like this:

 int& ref(int id)
 {
    static map<int, int> refs;
    return refs[id];
 }

Then call ref(id) when you need the reference. You need to figure out a way to generate "id's" for this one.

Depending on exactly you want to achieve, there may be a lot of other solutions. I'm pretty certain your question is an XY question - you are asking how to do Y because you think that is the right way to achieve X.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for "I'm pretty certain your question is an XY question". –  ildjarn Apr 19 '13 at 1:35

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