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My resources are stored in an assembly of their own, and I have a reference to that assembly in my web app. I am able to access resources in two different ways - via compiled constants or by using a ResourceManager.

var method1 = Prototype.Localization.CustomerRecord.BillingId;

or

var resx = new ResourceManager(typeof (Prototype.Localization.CustomerRecord));
var method2 = resx.GetString("BillingId");

Using the first approach seems like a no brainer (but that generally means it's going to come back and bite me when things get more complicated), so what are the advantages or disadvantages to the second approach? Is the first approach going to cause me issues down the road?

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2nd approach is what resx compiler does under the cover. IMO 2nd one is always worse because you have a string (then it may goes detached and you won't know until run-time). So I may ask: if first approach is shorter and easier then is there any good reason to use the 2nd one? My answer is "no" (moreover you can mix them, in case you'll need it for a special thing). –  Adriano Repetti Apr 9 '13 at 16:03
    
Thanks, Adriano. I will mark as accepted if you create as an answer. –  Joe Apr 9 '13 at 19:06
    
Tnx, I added the answer. –  Adriano Repetti Apr 9 '13 at 19:47

2 Answers 2

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So what are the advantages or disadvantages to the second approach?

2nd approach is what resx compiler does under the cover. IMO 2nd one is always worse because you have a string (then it may goes detached and you won't know until run-time) and because of that you'll lack of compile-time checks and design-time support.

Is the first approach going to cause me issues down the road?

No, at least no more than anything else (because you'll catch errors in your HTML pages when you'll first compile them at run-time).

So I may ask: if first approach is shorter and easier then is there any good reason to use the 2nd one? My answer is "no" (moreover you can mix them, in case you'll need it for a special thing).

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Yeah, I agree with Adriano that the 2nd is worse because of those "Magic" strings.

The first approach you have some more advantages that would include compile time check, since you reference a class and a property if this property doesn't exist you will get an error back, intellisense is another one.

Another advantage, is that if you decided to move away from the built in resource manager, you could just replace the generated class (resource class) by your own respecting the namespace and so on, with your own internal logic.

IMO, I would stick with the first one.

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