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I have four tables with the following construct:-

I am trying to construct a query which will output offerings which have an attendance below the average attendance for offerings of the course to which they belong. I have constructed two queries so far

This outputs the total number of attendees for each course

This outputs the total number of offerings for each course.

I think what i need to do is divide the results of the first query, by the results of the second query (which will give me the average attendance for each offering of each course) and then output only the offerings with attendance below that result. I really am struggling to build this query so I am basically looking for some help

Any help is much appreciated as always

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

One way to do it is to first find the number of attendees for each offering, then from this result find the average attendance for each course, join the average attendances to each related offering, and then select the ones where the actual attendance is lover than the average.

This can be done using a CTE:

WITH attendee_counts AS
(SELECT c.course_id, o.offering_id,
        COUNT (Student_id) AS attendees     -- find attendance
 FROM course c
 INNER JOIN offering o 
 ON o.course_id = c.course_id
 LEFT JOIN attendance a
 ON a.offering_id = o.offering_id
 GROUP BY c.course_id, o.offering_id)       -- for each offering 

SELECT ac.course_id, ac.offering_id,
       ac.attendees, avgs.avg_attendees
FROM attendee_counts AS ac
INNER JOIN
 (SELECT course_id, AVG(attendees) AS avg_attendees   -- then average
  FROM attendee_counts
  GROUP BY course_id) AS avgs                         -- by course
ON avgs.course_id = ac.course_id
WHERE ac.attendees < avgs.avg_attendees;  

The query (that works in PostgreSQL) can be tested here: http://www.sqlfiddle.com/#!1/f5b60/20/0

Edit:

Oracle seems to require a slightly different solution:

WITH attendee_counts AS
(SELECT c.course_id, o.offering_id,
        COUNT (Student_id) AS attendees
 FROM course c
 INNER JOIN offering o  ON o.course_id  = c.course_id
 LEFT JOIN attendance a ON a.offering_id = o.offering_id
 GROUP BY c.course_id, o.offering_id)

SELECT o.course_id, o.offering_id, o.attendees,
  avg(c.attendees) AS avg_attendees
  FROM attendee_counts o              -- connect attendance by offering
LEFT JOIN attendee_counts c
ON c.course_id = o.course_id          -- to each offering of the same course
GROUP BY o.course_id, o.offering_id, o.attendees
HAVING o.attendees < avg(c.attendees);

This can be tested here http://www.sqlfiddle.com/#!4/e50e4/4/0 (for Oracle 11g R2)

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d this fires the following errors at me Error starting at line 1 in command: Error at Command Line:13 Column:22 Error report: SQL Error: ORA-00933: SQL command not properly ended 00933. 00000 - "SQL command not properly ended" – Dot Apr 9 '13 at 21:12
    
@Matthew Check the modified solution that seems to work also in Oracle. – Terje D. Apr 9 '13 at 22:35
    
thanks alot terje, just one thing. I don't want to include details of courses with 0 attendees, how would i edit this to only show results for courses with 1 or more attendent – Dot Apr 9 '13 at 23:06
    
@Matthew - do you mean COURSES or OFFERINGS with no attendees? Because they will be different solutions. – APC Apr 10 '13 at 4:54
    
@Matthew Courses with no attendees are excluded as no offering then have a attendee count less than the average (0). To exclude offerings with no attendees from the result (but still include them when calculating averages), add AND o.attendees > 0 to the end of the query. To completely ignore offerings without any attendees, add HAVING COUNT(Student_id) > 0 to the first part of the query. – Terje D. Apr 10 '13 at 7:04

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