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I keep getting the error: java.lang.NoSuchMethodException: com.production.workflow.MyWorkflow.<init>(com.production.model.entity.WorkflowEntity)

I have a constructor that is expecting WorkflowEntity so I'm not able to figure out why it's saying NoSuchMethod. Is there something about constructor inheritance that is preventing this from instantiating?

My instantiation factory:

public static Workflow factory(WorkflowEntity workflowEntity) {
    try {
        Class<?> clazz = Class.forName(workflowEntity.getClassName()).asSubclass(Workflow.class);
        Constructor c = clazz.getConstructor(WorkflowEntity.class);
        Object workflowClass = c.newInstance(clazz);
        return (Workflow) workflowClass;
    } catch (Exception e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
        logger.severe("Unable to instantiate "+workflowEntity.getClassName()+" class: " + e.getLocalizedMessage());
    }

    return null;
}

Workflow class:

public class MyWorkflow extends Workflow {
//no constructors

Extended class:

abstract public class Workflow {
    protected static final Logger logger = Logger.getLogger(Workflow.class.getName());

    private WorkflowEntity entity;
    protected WorkflowProcess workflowProcess;

    @Autowired
    private WorkflowProcessService workflowProcessService;

    /* Don't use this one */
    public Workflow() { }

    /* Default constructor */
    public Workflow (WorkflowEntity entity) {
        this.entity = entity;

        //get first workflow process
        //@todo this should factor in rule, for multiple starting points
        for (WorkflowProcessEntity workflowProcessEntity : entity.getWorkflowProcesses()) {
            workflowProcess = WorkflowProcess.factory(workflowProcessEntity);
            break;
        }
    }
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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

There are two problems in your code:

  1. Constructors are not automatically inherited by subclasses. You need to add the MyWorkflow(WorkflowEntity) constructor to the MyWorkflow class.
  2. Your new instance call needs to be made with the workflowEntity instance (and not the class instance you are giving it now)

Here:

class MyWorkflow extends Workflow {

    public MyWorkflow() {
        super();
    }

    public MyWorkflow(WorkflowEntity entity) {
        super(entity);
    }
}
public static Workflow factory(WorkflowEntity workflowEntity) {
    try {
        Class<?> clazz = Class.forName(workflowEntity.getClassName())
                .asSubclass(Workflow.class);
        Constructor<?> c = clazz.getConstructor(WorkflowEntity.class);
        Object workflowClass = c.newInstance(workflowEntity);
        return (Workflow) workflowClass;
    } catch (Exception e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    }

    return null;
}
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Consider the builder pattern instead of the factory pattern. Here is an example that builds a WorkFlow that takes a WorkflowEntity constructor parameter and builds a workFlow that does not take a WorkFlowEntity pattern (just showing multiple options available via a builder).

public class WorkFlowBuilder
{
    private WorkflowEntity constructorParameter;
    private Class workflowClass;

    public WorkFlowBuilder(Class desiredWorkflowClass)
    {
        if (desiredWorkflowClass != null)
        {
            workflowClass = desiredWorkflowClass;
        }
        else
        {
            throw new IllegalArgumentException("blah blah blah");
        }
    }

    public void setConstructorParameter(final WorkflowEntity newValue)
    {
        constructorParameter = newValue;
    }

    public WorkFlow build()
    {
        Object workflowObject;

        if (constructorParameter != null)
        {
            Constructor constructor = workflowClass.getConstructor(WorkflowEntity.class);
            Object workflowObject;

            workflowObject = constructor.newInstance(workflowEntity);
        }
        else
        {
            workflowObject = workflowClass.newInstance();
        }

        return (WorkFlow)workflowObject;
    }
}

Use this as follows:

WorkFlowBuilder builder = new WorkFlowBuilder(MyWorkFlow.class);
WorkflowEntity entity = new WorkFlowEntity();
WorkFlow item;

entity... set stuff.

builder.setConstructerParameter(entity)
item = builder.build();
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Is there an advantage to this method over the factory? Is it more standard with common java practice among libraries? –  Webnet Apr 9 '13 at 19:11
1  
My preference is to use builder when there are variable numbers of constructor parameters. Factory seems fine, but in your case, I would pass the MyWorkFlow.class as a factory method parameter instead of as using the MyWorkFlow class name as a WorkFlowEntity parameter. –  DwB Apr 9 '13 at 20:03

I think you just want to pass in the workflowEntity into the constructor on the newInstance call, instead of the typed Class.

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Constructors lost their outside visibility during inheritance.

You need to redefine it in MyWorkflow.

This is done so because sub classes may not support the super class creation process. So super object constructors does not make sense to sub classes and it's even unsafe if they were visible outside.

You should also remove the default constructor if your class can be used if instantiated without WorkflowEntity. Just remove it from Workflow and do not add to MyWorkflow.

UPD

You should also consider using generics to avoid class casting.

public Workflow create(WorkflowEntity workflowEntity) throws 
               ClassNotFoundException, NoSuchMethodException, SecurityException
               , InstantiationException, IllegalAccessException
               , IllegalArgumentException, InvocationTargetException {

    Class<? extends Workflow> clazz = Class.forName(workflowEntity.getClassName()).asSubclass(Workflow.class);
    Constructor<? extends Workflow> c = clazz.getConstructor(WorkflowEntity.class);
    Workflow workflowClass = c.newInstance(clazz);
    return workflowClass;
}

class WorkflowEntity {

    public String getClassName() {
        return "className";
    };
}

class Workflow {

    Workflow(WorkflowEntity entity) {
    };
}

class MyWorkflow extends Workflow {

    MyWorkflow(WorkflowEntity entity) {
        super(entity);
    }
}
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