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I would like to have a function called GetMethodName such that the following code would print "myMethod":

int myMethod(string foo, double bar)
{
    // ...
}

Console.Out.WriteLine(GetMethodName(myMethod));

This should work no matter what the method signature myMethod has. Is this possible?

share|improve this question

No, it's not possible like that. It would be possible with the mythical infoof operator which the C# team would like to include, but haven't got round to yet - but without that, you'd have to use a method group conversion, which will only work if you know the specific type of delegate to use.

The closest you can probably come is to use an expression tree:

public static string GetMethodName(Expression expression)
{
    // Code to take apart the expression tree and find the method invocation
}

GetMethodName(() => myMethod(0, 0));

That wouldn't actually need to call myMethod, but you would need to provide dummy arguments - which could be irritating if there are any out/ref parameters.

share|improve this answer

As pointed out on Eric Lippert's blog you could fake it with the Action and Func delegates

public static MethodInfo GetInfo<T>(Action<T> action)
{
    return action.Method;
}
public static MethodInfo GetInfo<T, TResult>(Func<T, TResult> func)
{
    return func.Method;
}
public static MethodInfo GetInfo<T, U, TResult>(Func<T, U, TResult> func)
{
    return func.Method;
}   
public static int Target(int v1, int v2)
{
    return v1 ^ v2;
} 
static int Main(string[] args)
{
    var mi = GetInfo<string[], int>(Main);
    Console.WriteLine(mi.Name);

    var mi2 = GetInfo<int, int, int>(Target);
    Console.WriteLine(mi2.Name);
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
You'd need umpteen variants for different parameters though - including combinations of ref/out as well :( – Jon Skeet Oct 19 '09 at 21:08
    
true... but it is possible. I had a sample that was up to 4 inputs (count on Func and Action) but I figured that was too much code for a quick sample. – Matthew Whited Oct 19 '09 at 22:46
    
how would GetInfo distinguish between a void method taking 2 int arguments on the one hand and an int method taking 1 int argument on the other? – JoelFan Oct 20 '09 at 14:54
    
you have to overload the method as Jon said – Matthew Whited Oct 20 '09 at 16:41
up vote 2 down vote accepted

What about this?

public static string GetMethodName(Expression<Action> exp)
{
    var b = (MethodCallExpression)exp.Body;
    return b.Method.Name;
}

// ...


var name = GetMethodName(() => myMethod(string.Empty, 0.0));
System.Out.WriteLine(name);
share|improve this answer

Something like the below?

new StackFrame(1, false).GetMethod().Name

:Edit to add code sample...

    public string PrintMethodName()
    {
        return new StackFrame(1, false).GetMethod().Name;
    }

    private void Hi()
    {
        Console.WriteLine(PrintMethodName());
    }
share|improve this answer
    
See my comment to Mircea. – Jon Skeet Oct 19 '09 at 20:04

EDIT: Misunderstood the question. It actually helps reading the question.

You can use Reflection:

MethodBase.GetCurrentMethod returns the current running method.

share|improve this answer
    
There's nothing to indicate that it's the current method. It's just a random method he wants to get the name of. – Jon Skeet Oct 19 '09 at 20:03
    
@Jon Ah, you're right. I misunderstood what he meant. – Mircea Grelus Oct 19 '09 at 20:09
1  
It was my first guess too - then I took the unusual step of reading the question ;) (I've done this so many times myself...) – Jon Skeet Oct 19 '09 at 20:10

Yes it is doable. Look at class StackFrame and its GetMethod.

EDIT: looks like I misunderstood the original question. Never mind my original answer.

share|improve this answer
    
See my response to Mircea. There's nothing in the question to suggest the OP wants to get the current method. – Jon Skeet Oct 19 '09 at 20:06

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