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I want to send email from JSF application. I created simple Java SE application and method to send email, it works. So I moved this code to Managed Bean, but in JSF application this doesn't work. I am new to Java, I tried to debug it but though debugging is started and it says that site is on localhost:8080 the site doesn't appear, so I only can Run project and click my button to verify if email is received on inbox.

I am on Ubuntu 12.10, with NetBeans. And since it works perfect in other project (Java Se app) I thought maybe I have to trigger this sending different way in JSP web app? Why it doesn't work from ManagedBean?

Here is my class with copied method (this method works in Java Se app):

import javax.mail.Address;
import javax.mail.*;
import org.apache.commons.mail.Email;
import org.apache.commons.mail.EmailException;
import org.apache.commons.mail.SimpleEmail;
import org.apache.commons.mail.DefaultAuthenticator;


public class myEmailSend {
    public void sendMail(){

        Email email = new SimpleEmail();
        try {
            String authuser = "me@gmail.com";
            String authpwd = "password";
            email.setSmtpPort(587);
            email.setAuthenticator(new DefaultAuthenticator(authuser, authpwd));
            email.setDebug(true);
            email.setHostName("smtp.gmail.com");
            email.getMailSession().getProperties().put("mail.smtps.auth", "true");
            email.getMailSession().getProperties().put("mail.debug", "true");
            email.getMailSession().getProperties().put("mail.smtps.port", "587");
            email.getMailSession().getProperties().put("mail.smtps.socketFactory.port", "587");
            email.getMailSession().getProperties().put("mail.smtps.socketFactory.class",   "javax.net.ssl.SSLSocketFactory");
            email.getMailSession().getProperties().put("mail.smtps.socketFactory.fallback", "false");
            email.getMailSession().getProperties().put("mail.smtp.starttls.enable", "true");
            email.setFrom("me@gmail.com", "Agencja Ubezpieczeniowa");
            email.setSubject("TestMail");
            email.setMsg("This is a test mail3");
            email.addTo("someone@gmail.com", "ToName");
            //email.setStartTLSRequired(false);
            email.send();
        } catch (EmailException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}

I have this bean. I tried both: creating myEmailSend object and using its method, and send directly via sendMail2(): none of these works:

import javax.faces.bean.ManagedBean;
import javax.faces.bean.RequestScoped;
import javax.mail.*;
import org.apache.commons.mail.DefaultAuthenticator;
import org.apache.commons.mail.Email;
import org.apache.commons.mail.EmailException;
import org.apache.commons.mail.SimpleEmail;


/**
 *
 * @author root
 */
@ManagedBean
@RequestScoped
public class mySendBean {

    private myEmailSend mE;
    /**
     * Creates a new instance of mySendBean
     */
    public mySendBean() {
        mE=new myEmailSend();
    }

    public void sendMail(){
        mE.sendMail();
    }
    public void sendMail2(){


        Email email = new SimpleEmail();
        try {
            String authuser = "me@gmail.com";
            String authpwd = "password";
            email.setSmtpPort(587);
            email.setAuthenticator(new DefaultAuthenticator(authuser, authpwd));
            email.setDebug(true);
            email.setHostName("smtp.gmail.com");
            email.getMailSession().getProperties().put("mail.smtps.auth", "true");
            email.getMailSession().getProperties().put("mail.debug", "true");
            email.getMailSession().getProperties().put("mail.smtps.port", "587");
            email.getMailSession().getProperties().put("mail.smtps.socketFactory.port", "587");
            email.getMailSession().getProperties().put("mail.smtps.socketFactory.class",   "javax.net.ssl.SSLSocketFactory");
            email.getMailSession().getProperties().put("mail.smtps.socketFactory.fallback", "false");
            email.getMailSession().getProperties().put("mail.smtp.starttls.enable", "true");
            email.setFrom("me@gmail.com", "Agencja Ubezpieczeniowa");
            email.setSubject("TestMail");
            email.setMsg("This is a test mail3");
            email.addTo("someone@gmail.com", "ToName");
            //email.setStartTLSRequired(false);
            email.send();
        } catch (EmailException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}

and try to trigger it from button on site:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<!--
To change this template, choose Tools | Templates
and open the template in the editor.
-->
<!DOCTYPE html>
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml"
      xmlns:h="http://java.sun.com/jsf/html">

    <body>
        <div>zapytaj <br></br>TODO write content<br></br></div>
        <h:form>
            <h:commandButton id="comand1" value="sendEmail" action="#{mySendBean.sendMail2()}" />
        </h:form>
    </body>
</html>

something is happening cause I see: "waiting for localhost..." in Firefox but still no mail.

share|improve this question
1  
The code to send the email will work fine. To begin with, remove the email sending code from the managed bean constructor (you don't really want to send an email on every request where the bean is created). Second, make sure your web application server (or your project) has the Java Mail API just in order to send the emails. After all this, the only problem may be that an external agent is blocking the communication (probably your antivirus and a firewall). Try to stop them just to test the functionality. –  Luiggi Mendoza Apr 9 '13 at 17:16
    
@LuiggiMendoza thank you very much. I develop and run both applications from same Netbans on same machine. JSF is using Glassfish, Java Se app is using glassfish too? –  AB_ Apr 9 '13 at 17:33
    
No, GlassFish is using Java SE. –  Luiggi Mendoza Apr 9 '13 at 17:34
    
@LuiggiMendoza but this is .xhtml file. doesn't it have to be servlet? –  AB_ Apr 9 '13 at 18:00
    
Are you new to JSF? –  Luiggi Mendoza Apr 9 '13 at 20:17

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

yes, you can : p I just had to use jsf templating

share|improve this answer
    
What is jsf templating? –  Koray Tugay Oct 6 '13 at 9:47
    

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