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What is the code clean up needed on the following linq inorder to validate Email IDs

Error: var validemails = emails.Where(p=>IsValidFormat(p)).Select;

 Dictionary<int, string> emails = new Dictionary<int, string>();
 emails.Add(1, "Marry@yahoo.com");
 emails.Add(2, "Helan@gmail.com");
 emails.Add(3, "Rose");
 emails.Add(4, "Ana");
 emails.Add(5, "Dhia@yahoo.com");




public static bool IsValidFormat(string InputEmailID)

{
    var format =
                 @"^([\w-\.]+)@((\[[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}.\.[0-9]{1,3}\.)|
                 (([\w-]+\.)+))([a-zA-Z]{2,4}|[0-9]{1,3})(\]?)$";

                  Regex Rex=new Regex(format);
                  return Rex.IsMatch(InputEmailID);

 }

Error Report : Can not convert from 'System.Collections.Generic.KeyValuePair' to 'string'

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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You need to send the function a string, not a KeyValuePair

var validemails = emails.Where(p=>IsValidFormat(p.Value)).Select(kv => kv.Value);
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Ya it is working fine thanks –  user192332 Oct 19 '09 at 20:11
    
No Problem... You should mark the answer though... Good Luck~ –  BigBlondeViking Oct 19 '09 at 20:49
    
I followed Joel's answer i received "Cannot assign method group to an implicitly-typed local variable" .How to correct it? –  user192332 Oct 19 '09 at 20:53
    
var validemails = emails.Where(p=>p.Key.IsValidEmail()).Select(p=>p.key); –  BigBlondeViking Oct 19 '09 at 22:04

Take a look here at the MSDN forums: KeyValuePair VS DictionaryEntry

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It sounds like email is a dictionary rather than a simple IEnumerable<string>

You want something more like this:

var validemails = emails.Where(p=>IsValidFormat(p.Key));

or

var validemails = emails.Where(p=>IsValidFormat(p.Value));

depending on whether the "emailid" is the key or the value in your dictionary.

I'd also refactor you validation method like this:

public static bool IsValidEmail(this string InputEmailID)
{
    var format =
             @"^([\w-\.]+)@((\[[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}.\.[0-9]{1,3}\.)|
             (([\w-]+\.)+))([a-zA-Z]{2,4}|[0-9]{1,3})(\]?)$";

    Regex Rex=new Regex(format);
    return Rex.IsMatch(InputEmailID);
}

So you can call the validation like this:

var validemails = emails.Where(p=>p.Key.IsValidEmail());
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Joel. Where can i get better Generics examples ? –  user192332 Oct 19 '09 at 20:12
    
You mean to say extension method right? –  user192332 Oct 19 '09 at 20:13
    
Excellent refactoring ,Thanks a lot. –  user192332 Oct 19 '09 at 20:15
    
The following declaration var mails = emails.Where(p=>(p.Value.IsValidFormat())).Select; shows error "can not assign method group to implicitly typed local variable".Do i need to use dictionary instead? –  user192332 Oct 19 '09 at 20:27
    
No, it means you need to not use the extension method. But I would still rename it to "IsValidEmail()". "IsValidFormat()" could refer to any format. –  Joel Coehoorn Oct 19 '09 at 22:55

I just experimented with this code:

using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text.RegularExpressions;

namespace ConsoleApplication1
{
    public class Program
    {
        private static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            var emails = new Dictionary<int, string>();

            emails.Add(1, "Marry@yahoo.com");
            emails.Add(2, "Helan@gmail.com");
            emails.Add(3, "Rose");
            emails.Add(4, "Ana");
            emails.Add(5, "Dhia@yahoo.com");

            var validemails = emails.Where(p => IsValidFormat(p.Value)).ToList();
        }


        public static bool IsValidFormat(string inputEmailId)
        {
            const string format = @"^([\w-\.]+)@((\[[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}.\.[0-9]{1,3}\.)|(([\w-]+\.)+))([a-zA-Z]{2,4}|[0-9]{1,3})(\]?)$";

            var rex = new Regex(format);
            return rex.IsMatch(inputEmailId);
        }
    }
}

Which looks to have worked. I'm not 100% sure what is going on, but the key is that you needed to use p.Value.

I'm sure someone will explain the finer details - I'm hoping to learn a bit from this also.

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Cheers there too –  user192332 Oct 19 '09 at 20:16

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