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I've tried using the following code, but as far as I can tell it only checks the first two variables.

if (var1 || var2 || var3)
{
    // Do something.
}
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closed as not a real question by Dour High Arch, Wouter J, Rafael Osipov, Kirk, madth3 Apr 10 '13 at 4:49

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

3  
I can tell it only checks the first two variables, if one of them is true, no need to check the third one (the second is true in your case) :) – I4V Apr 9 '13 at 19:25
6  
No. It first checks if var1 is true, if it's not it checks if var2 is true, if not it checkes var3. It's called short circuiting, which is exactly what you want in the question title. – System Down Apr 9 '13 at 19:25
1  
OP, do you mean you only want the statement to evaluate to true if ONLY one of three is true, but not if 2 or 3 are true? – tnw Apr 9 '13 at 19:27
    
No, I'm fine with it evaluating if one or more of them is true. – user2263272 Apr 9 '13 at 19:28
    
Then you're already doing it the correct way. – System Down Apr 9 '13 at 19:29

If you need to evaluate all three, you can use:

if (var1 | var2 | var3)
{
    // Do something.
}

instead. It would seem strange to have such a need, but suppose all three were properties whose getters had side effects ...

With methods it could be:

if (DoWork() | DoDuties() | DoFinalStuff())
{
    // At least one method returned true ("success")
}

All three methods are called in any case.

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Your code is correctly checking for one of the three variables to be true, i.e.

var1 || var2 || var3

is true if any of var1, var2 and var3 is true. The only subtelty here is that the actual check is performed using short-circuit logic: if var1 is true, it won't bother to check var2 and var3, etc.

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I feel the other answers already cover what you need to do but I wanted to give a better explanation of what is happening.

The || or && operator is what is called a "short circuit" operators, if it finds conditions to meet it's needs it stops checking other elements (the first true it finds for || or the first false it finds for &&).

so in effect

if(var1 || var2 || var3)
   SomeAction();

is the same as doing

if(var1)
    SomeAction();
else if(var2)
    SomeAction();
else if(var3)
    SomeAction();

If you only use | instead of || it will evaluate all of the members before it returns the result, something similar to this

bool combined = var1;
combined = var2 **OR'ed with** combined; 
combined = var3 **OR'ed with** combined; 

if(combined)
    SomeAction();

A very useful real-world use of short circuiting is checking for null before calling a member or method. In the following example, imagine var1 is a variable that could be null and you need to perform an action when var1.DataAvailable() is true. For example

if(var1 != null && var1.DataAvailable())
{
    //do somthing with var1 when data is available
}

Is the same as

if(var1 != null)
{
    if(var1.DataAvailable())
    {
        //do somthing with var1 when data is available
    }
}

Because of short circuting you will never get a NullRefrenceException because var1.DataAvailable() never executes if var1 is null

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Nobody mentioned, that:

| - binary OR
|| - logical OR

Lets assume a = false b = true c=false

a || b || c == true
a | b | c == 0 | 1 | 0 == 1 which also has the logical "true" value.

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