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I'm writing a python front-end for Debian's debootstrap utility. Debootstrap can output progress information, but it does it if file descriptor #3 is open, and it writes to this fd.

I've found some hints, but I failed to understand how to do it in Python.

How do I create fd#3 in Python, run debootstrap subprocess and read from fd#3?

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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think you'll need to use the low level OS APIs to set up a pipe on fd 3, like:

import os, sys

# No other fds have been opened, so the lowest available are used (3, 4)
read, write = os.pipe()

# We want the child to write into fd#3, but right now that's the read
# end of the pipe, so do a little switching around:
temp = os.dup(read)
os.dup2(write, read)
os.dup2(temp, write)
os.close(temp)
read, write = write, read # swap actual values to avoid confusion

pid = os.fork()
if pid == 0: # child
   os.close(read)
   try:
       os.execl('/bin/bash', 'bash', '-c', 'echo testing...>&3')
   except OSError:
       sys.exit(1)
else: # parent
   os.close(write)
   progress = os.fdopen(read)
   print progress.read()
   os.wait()

Basically, create the pipe, and swap the read/write ends so that the write end is on fd#3 (the lowest available fds will be used, so be sure you haven't opened any others yet).

Then, fork and close the appropraite pipe ends in the parent and child. Then we can exec the target in the child, in my case I used bash as an example. In the parent, we can then build a normal file-like object around the read end of the pipe, and proceed along with it without worrying about the low level APIs.

It might be possible to use the subprocess module if you set FD_CLOEXEC on the read end of the pipe, but you'd still have to do the low level calls to set up the pipe, so there's not much gain in doing so.

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Thanks, I just used dup2() to ensure fd#3: os.dup2(write, 3) –  Igor Apr 9 '13 at 21:52
    
To do this more cleanly, skip the stuff between os.pipe() and os.fork() and instead just call os.dup2(write, 3) in the child process after forking. This way if fd 3 is already in use in the parent process, you won't mess it up. –  augurar Jan 13 at 8:52
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Here it is:

import os, sys

read, write = os.pipe()

pid = os.fork()
if pid == 0: # child
   os.close(read)
   os.dup2(write, 3)
   os.close(write)
   try:
       os.execl('/bin/bash', 'bash', '-c', 'for f in 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8; do echo testing...>&3; sleep 1; done')
   except OSError:
       sys.exit(1)
else: # parent
   os.close(write)
   progress = os.fdopen(read)
   while True:
       l = progress.readline()
       if l:
           print l
       else:
           break
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