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I know this have been asked several times but I didn't find the one that matches my situation, so, had to ask.

I have two files
1) connection.php

class Database {

    protected $dbh;

    public function __construct() {
        $dsn = 'mysql:dbname=dbname;host=localhost';
        $user = 'dbuser';
        $pass = 'dbpass';

        try {
            $this->dbh = new PDO($dsn, $user, $password);
        } catch (PDOException $e) {
            echo 'Connection failed: ' . $e->getMessage();
        }
    }

    public function displayInfo() {
        $stmt = $this->dbh->prepare("SELECT fname, lname FROM info");
        return $stmt->execute();
    }

}

$db = new Database();

2.) info.php

require_once 'connection.php';

$result = $db->displayInfo();

while ($row = $result->fetch(PDO::FETCH_ASSOC)) {
    echo $row['fname']. " " . $row['lname'];
}

I understand I cannot use the fetch() with $result and if it was in same page I could use $stmt->fetch() but couldn't figure out how to call this PDO fetch from another page.

share|improve this question
    
I know you are not here to explain the downvote of genuine question. Anyways, thank you for taking your busy time to come here and sniff around with your big-time-charlie ego. you sir need a big hi5 in the cheek !!! –  Jhilke Dai Apr 9 '13 at 21:54

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The PDOStatement::execute() method returns true on success or false on failure -- not the result of the query. You need to return your statement instead:

public function displayInfo() {
    $stmt = $this->dbh->prepare("SELECT fname, lname FROM info");
    $stmt->execute();
    return $stmt;
}

In this way the $result variable is actually your statement and you can call the fetch() method on it.

A better way is to do the fetch from inside the displayInfo() method and return just the results and not have to rely on bringing your Database goodies outside of the class like:

class Database 
{

   protected $dbh;

   public function __construct() {
      $dsn = 'mysql:dbname=dbname;host=localhost';
      $user = 'dbuser';
      $pass = 'dbpass';

      try {
         $this->dbh = new PDO($dsn, $user, $password);
      } catch (PDOException $e) {
         echo 'Connection failed: ' . $e->getMessage();
      }
   }

   public function getDisplayInfo() {
      $stmt = $this->dbh->prepare("SELECT fname, lname FROM info");
      if( $stmt->execute() ) {
         return $stmt->fetch(PDO::FETCH_ASSOC);
      }
      // Query failed
      return false;
   }
}

$db = new Database();

$results = $db->getDisplayInfo();

foreach($results as $row) {
   echo $row['fname']. " " . $row['lname'];
}
share|improve this answer
    
I guess I have done the same here return $stmt->execute(); and have stored the value in $result from where I was calling. BTW, how to proceed with your second method, I am quiet new to PDO –  Jhilke Dai Apr 9 '13 at 19:53
    
@JhilkeDai See update. –  cillosis Apr 9 '13 at 19:59
    
Can whoever down-voted this answer provide an explanation? –  cillosis Apr 9 '13 at 20:03
    
@your common sense was correct, instead of using fetch(PDO::FETCH_ASSOC) the fetchAll() did the trick. I have edited your answer to meet that. –  Jhilke Dai Apr 9 '13 at 21:14
    
I edited the answer but some peer didn't like it. Anyways what I edited was changed this line return $stmt->fetch(PDO::FETCH_ASSOC); to return $stmt->fetchAll(); and it worked for me –  Jhilke Dai Apr 9 '13 at 21:48

The proper code. See details in PDO tag wiki

class Database {

    protected $dbh;

    public function __construct() {
        $dsn = 'mysql:dbname=dbname;host=localhost';
        $user = 'dbuser';
        $pass = 'dbpass';
        $opt = array(
            PDO::ATTR_ERRMODE            => PDO::ERRMODE_EXCEPTION,
            PDO::ATTR_DEFAULT_FETCH_MODE => PDO::FETCH_ASSOC
        );
        $this->dbh = new PDO($dsn, $user, $password, $opt);
    }

    public function displayInfo() {
        $stmt = $this->dbh->prepare("SELECT fname, lname FROM info");
        $stmt->execute();
        return $stmt->fetchAll();
    }

}
share|improve this answer
    
The real proper code would disable emulated prepared statements when connecting with mysql and probably set the encoding of the connection. And just use PDO::query() when there is nothing to prepare. –  PeeHaa Apr 9 '13 at 20:02
    
I am upvoting this because I mixed this return $stmt->fetchAll(); with @Cillious answer, which was suitable for me. Thank you !!! –  Jhilke Dai Apr 9 '13 at 21:16

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