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I have a data frame that looks like:

ID Time U1 U2 U3 U4 ...
1  20    1  2 3  5 .. 
2  20    2  5 9  4 ..
3  20    2  5 6  4 ..
.
.

And I would need to keep it like: 

ID Time  U
1  20    1
1  20    2
1  20    3
1  20    5
2  20    2
2  20    5
2  20    9
2  20    4
3  20    2
3  20    5
3  20    6
3  20    4

I tried with:

X <- read.table("mydata.txt", header=TRUE, sep=",")
X_D <- as.data.frame(X)
X_new <- stack(X_D, select = -c(ID, Time))

But I haven't managed to get the data into that form. Honestly, I have little experience with stacking/transposing, so any help is greatly appreciated!

Thanks!

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This is commonly called conversion from wide format to long format. However, the way you've defined it, you lose information about which column a piece of data came from. Incidentally, the package reshape2 covers this sort of transformation. –  ndoogan Apr 9 '13 at 19:54
    
Additionally, you're more likely to get the answer you really want if you provide a really easy way for answerers to get example data into R to work with. Providing what's in the file isn't simple, but providing dput() output of the original example dataframe object IS! –  ndoogan Apr 9 '13 at 20:00
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3 Answers

With base reshape:

dat <- read.table(text="ID Time U1 U2 U3 U4
1  20    1  2 3  5
2  20    2  5 9  4
3  20    2  5 6  4", header=TRUE)


colnames(dat) <- gsub("([a-zA-Z]*)([0-9])", "\\1.\\2", colnames(dat))
reshape(dat, varying=3:ncol(dat), v.names="U", direction ="long", timevar = "Time", 
    idvar = "ID")
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(+1) It could be worth specifying what "base reshape" means in the context of another reshape answer that depends on reshape2 package. –  ndoogan Apr 9 '13 at 20:10
    
This should do it for anyone wondering: ?reshape –  Tyler Rinker Apr 9 '13 at 20:15
    
+1 for matching the output exactly, but I do also worry about loosing information this way. –  Ananda Mahto Apr 10 '13 at 5:41
    
@AnandaMahto Agreed. In this case I didn't see it as a problem so I dropped it to match the user's wants. –  Tyler Rinker Apr 10 '13 at 6:01
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Here's the stack approach:

dat2a <- data.frame(dat[1:2], stack(dat[3:ncol(dat)]))
dat2a
#    ID Time values ind
# 1   1   20      1  U1
# 2   2   20      2  U1
# 3   3   20      2  U1
# 4   1   20      2  U2
# 5   2   20      5  U2
# 6   3   20      5  U2
# 7   1   20      3  U3
# 8   2   20      9  U3
# 9   3   20      6  U3
# 10  1   20      5  U4
# 11  2   20      4  U4
# 12  3   20      4  U4

This is very similar to melt from "reshape2":

library(reshape2)
dat2b <- melt(dat, id.vars=1:2)
dat2b
#    ID Time variable value
# 1   1   20       U1     1
# 2   2   20       U1     2
# 3   3   20       U1     2
# 4   1   20       U2     2
# 5   2   20       U2     5
# 6   3   20       U2     5
# 7   1   20       U3     3
# 8   2   20       U3     9
# 9   3   20       U3     6
# 10  1   20       U4     5
# 11  2   20       U4     4
# 12  3   20       U4     4

And, very similar to @TylerRinker's answer, but not dropping the "times", is to just use sep = "" to help R guess time and variable names.

dat3 <- reshape(dat, direction = "long", idvar=1:2, 
                varying=3:ncol(dat), sep = "", timevar="Measure")
dat3
#        ID Time Measure U
# 1.20.1  1   20       1 1
# 2.20.1  2   20       1 2
# 3.20.1  3   20       1 2
# 1.20.2  1   20       2 2
# 2.20.2  2   20       2 5
# 3.20.2  3   20       2 5
# 1.20.3  1   20       3 3
# 2.20.3  2   20       3 9
# 3.20.3  3   20       3 6
# 1.20.4  1   20       4 5
# 2.20.4  2   20       4 4
# 3.20.4  3   20       4 4

In all three of those, you end up with four columns, not three, like you describe in your desired output. However, as @ndoogan points out, by doing so, you're loosing information about your data. If you're fine with that, you can always drop that column from the resulting data.frame quite easily (for example, dat2a <- dat2a[-4].

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Try this:

do.call(rbind, lapply(1:4, function(i)structure(dat[,c("ID", "Time", paste0("U",i))], names=c("ID", "Time", "U"))))

Where dat is your data.frame...

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! It gives me an error though: 'undefined columns selected' here '[.data.frame'(dat, ,[,c("ID", "Time", –  user2263330 Apr 9 '13 at 20:03
    
Hi @user2263330, it works for me with dat <- data.frame(ID=1:3, Time=20, U1=1:3, U2=4:6, U3=7:9, U4=10:12). What are the names of your data.frame? –  Ferdinand.kraft Apr 9 '13 at 20:08
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