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I would like to specialize a function template such that the return type changes depending on the type of the template argument.

class ReturnTypeSpecialization
{
public:
    template<typename T>
    T Item();
};

// Normally just return the template type
template<typename T>
T ReturnTypeSpecialization::Item() { ... }

// When a float is specified, return an int
// This doesn't work:
template<float>
int ReturnTypeSpecialization::Item() { ... }

Is this possible? I can't use C++11.

share|improve this question
    
what are you trying to achieve? –  didierc Apr 9 '13 at 20:37
    
I want a function to return the type that is provided as a template argument, except in one special case I want the function to return a different type. –  M. Dudley Apr 9 '13 at 20:40

4 Answers 4

up vote 15 down vote accepted

Since the specialization has to agree with the base template on the return type, you can make it so by adding a "return type trait", a struct you can specialize and draw the true return type from:

// in the normal case, just the identity
template<class T>
struct item_return{ typedef T type; };

template<class T>
typename item_return<T>::type item();

template<>
struct item_return<float>{ typedef int type; };
template<>
int item<float>();

Live example.

Note that you might want to stick to the following, so you only need to update the return-type in the item_return specialization.

template<>
item_return<float>::type foo<float>(){ ... }
// note: No `typename` needed, because `float` is not a dependent type
share|improve this answer
    
+1 I like this one :P –  Rapptz Apr 9 '13 at 20:51
1  
Make sure all specializations are declared before they might be instantiated. Practically speaking, this means the specialization MUST be declared in the same header file, and the declarations ought to be as close together as possible. –  aschepler Apr 9 '13 at 20:55
    
@aschepler: Very good point. Fiddling around with specializations in this form is pretty volatile. –  Xeo Apr 9 '13 at 20:57
1  
The type in trait<T>::type would be a dependent name if T was a dependent type, i.e. a template parameter or a type derived from a template parameter. "Derived" here means like typedef std::pair<A, B> T; where A and/or B is a template parameter. –  Xeo Apr 9 '13 at 21:04
1  
@didierc: Well, a dependent type in C++ can also depend on a value... if it's a dependent value. ;) Either a (non-type) template parameter, again, or any value derived from a template parameter. There are dependent types, dependent values, and dependent names. –  Xeo Apr 9 '13 at 21:21

You can do template specializations like so:

template<typename T>
T item() {
    return T();
}

template<>
float item<float>() {
    return 1.0f;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
This would imply that T is also the always the return type, which from the example in the question, doesn't seem to be the case. –  Xeo Apr 9 '13 at 20:33
    
@Zeta: You can fully specialize them (also called explicit specialization). –  Xeo Apr 9 '13 at 20:34
    
@Xeo: Title of the question: " Overriding return type in function template specialization ". Probably a typo in the question's content. –  Zeta Apr 9 '13 at 20:34
    
@Zeta: With the comments, that would be a big typo... –  Xeo Apr 9 '13 at 20:35
    
@Xeo yeah you're right this would imply that T is the return type. –  Rapptz Apr 9 '13 at 20:36

Perhaps you could use the following hack. Given these simple type traits:

template<bool b, typename T, typename U>
struct conditional { typedef T type; };

template<typename T, typename U>
struct conditional<false, T, U> { typedef U type; };

template<typename T, typename U>
struct is_same { static const bool value = false; };

template<typename T>
struct is_same<T, T> { static const bool value = true; };

You could write your class and specialized member function as follows:

class ReturnTypeSpecialization
{
public:
    template<typename T>
    typename conditional<is_same<T, float>::value, int, T>::type 
    Item();
};

// Normally just return the template type
template<typename T>
typename conditional<is_same<T, float>::value, int, T>::type
ReturnTypeSpecialization::Item() { return T(); }

// When a float is specified, return an int
template<>
int ReturnTypeSpecialization::Item<float>() { return 1.0f; }

Simple test program (uses C++11 just for verification):

int main()
{
    ReturnTypeSpecialization obj;
    static_assert(std::is_same<decltype(obj.Item<bool>()), bool>::value, "!");
    static_assert(std::is_same<decltype(obj.Item<float>()), int>::value, "!");
}

Here is a live example.

share|improve this answer
    
He doesn't have C++11. –  Rapptz Apr 9 '13 at 20:47
    
@Rapptz: OK, sorry I missed that. But I believe this could be rewritten without using any C++11 feature (std::conditional is not hard to rewrite) –  Andy Prowl Apr 9 '13 at 20:49
    
I think you got your condition the wrong way around. Also, this is pretty boilerplate-y to extend to more specializations and even worse, all specializations must be known before-hand. –  Xeo Apr 9 '13 at 20:54
    
@Xeo: Why is the condition wrong? –  Andy Prowl Apr 9 '13 at 20:54
    
// When a float is specified, return an int, but you specialize for int and return float. –  Xeo Apr 9 '13 at 20:55

Do all of the specialization in a worker class and use a simple function as a wrapper that will be specialized implicitly.

#include <iostream>
using std::cout;

// worker class -- return a reference to the given value
template< typename V > struct worker
   {
   typedef V const & type;
   static type get( V const & v ) { return v; }
   };

// worker class specialization -- convert 'unsigned char' to 'int'
template<> struct worker<unsigned char>
   {
   typedef int type;
   static type get( unsigned char const & v ) { return v; }
   };

// mapper function
template< typename V > typename worker<V>::type mapper( V const & v )
   {
   return worker<V>::get(v);
   }

int main()
   {
   char a='A';
   unsigned char b='B';
   cout << "a=" << mapper(a) << ", b=" << mapper(b) << "\n";
   }

In this example, the specialization of unsigned char causes it to be converted to an int so that cout will display it as a number instead of as a character, generating the following output...

a=A, b=66
share|improve this answer
    
This has the same underlying mechanics as @Xeo's answer, but might be considered a little bit cleaner since there is only one specialization required. Another feature, as implemented, is that the normal case is essentially a NOP -- it simply returns a reference to the original value. –  nobar Jan 23 at 5:27

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