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I have the following sample data

    BR WT   SW   PO
1  4.0  7  2.0  1.0
2 12.0  5  4.0  2.0
3  8.0  7  5.0  8.6
4  9.0  3  5.6  9.0
5  1.0 10  6.0  5.0
6  6.0  2  7.5 12.0
7  7.0  3 10.0 15.0
8  4.5 10 12.0  6.0

What I'm trying to do is first go through each column of data, and within each column:

(a) rank each value with respect to the whole column, and

(b) count the total number of observations in the column.

Then, for each column, I'm trying to do a mathematical expression, namely "rank/(count+1)", and assign that result to a variable. Here is my code so far for this sample data frame ("df").

    for (i in 1:ncol(df)) {
      assign(paste("x",i,sep=""),rank(-df[,i],ties.method="first"))
      assign(paste("y",i,sep=""),length(df[,i]))
      assign(paste("z",i,sep=""),(x[i]/(y[i]+1)))
    }

When I troubleshoot each "assign" line, the "x" and "y" variables work fine:

> x1
[1] 7 1 3 2 8 5 4 6

> x2
[1] 3 5 4 6 1 8 7 2

> x3
[1] 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

> x4
[1] 8 7 4 3 6 2 1 5

y1:4 (in this case) work fine, all resulting in a value of 8. The operation of x[i]/(y[i]+1), however, results in the following error:

Error in assign(paste("z", i, sep = ""), (x[i]/(y[i] + 1))) : 
  object 'y' not found

Anyone have any ideas? Once I calculate this new "z[i]" value, how do I create a new dataframe with those z values, so that I can move on to ggplot?

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1  
General tip: try banishing assign from your vocabulary entirely for a couple months (or even more). Once you realize how infrequently you actually need it, you'll have a better sense of when it is useful. –  joran Apr 9 '13 at 21:05
    
By that I take it you mean replace " –  AndMan21 Apr 10 '13 at 16:48

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Is there a reason why this has to be done as a loop? Anyway, using your data

dat <- read.table(text = "    BR WT   SW   PO
1  4.0  7  2.0  1.0
2 12.0  5  4.0  2.0
3  8.0  7  5.0  8.6
4  9.0  3  5.6  9.0
5  1.0 10  6.0  5.0
6  6.0  2  7.5 12.0
7  7.0  3 10.0 15.0
8  4.5 10 12.0  6.0", header = TRUE)

this returns the ranks

r <- sapply(dat, function(x) rank(-x, ties.method = "first"))

> r
     BR WT SW PO
[1,]  7  3  8  8
[2,]  1  5  7  7
[3,]  3  4  6  4
[4,]  2  6  5  3
[5,]  8  1  4  6
[6,]  5  8  3  2
[7,]  4  7  2  1
[8,]  6  2  1  5

As length(dat[, i]) is the same for all i, and is given by nrow(dat), you can ignore the assignment of y and move straight to the last operation:

> r / (nrow(dat) + 1)
            BR        WT        SW        PO
[1,] 0.7777778 0.3333333 0.8888889 0.8888889
[2,] 0.1111111 0.5555556 0.7777778 0.7777778
[3,] 0.3333333 0.4444444 0.6666667 0.4444444
[4,] 0.2222222 0.6666667 0.5555556 0.3333333
[5,] 0.8888889 0.1111111 0.4444444 0.6666667
[6,] 0.5555556 0.8888889 0.3333333 0.2222222
[7,] 0.4444444 0.7777778 0.2222222 0.1111111
[8,] 0.6666667 0.2222222 0.1111111 0.5555556

assuming I understand what you are trying to do of course...

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Beat me to it by a second! Just as I was about to copy/paste my solution, "load 1 new answer" popped up. Curses! :) –  Roman Luštrik Apr 9 '13 at 20:47
    
Wow thanks! Can't believe I didn't think about sapply. I kept that length(dat[,i]) in there in case the columns were of differing length for more advanced datasets, though. Suggestions? –  AndMan21 Apr 9 '13 at 20:54
    
If df is a data frame, it is not possible for the columns to be of different length - that is one of the features of a data frame –  Gavin Simpson Apr 9 '13 at 20:58
    
Right, I see your point, but even if "empty" cells in a .csv that was imported as a data frame are replaced with NA, you can tell the length function to skip those, right? Wouldn't that give you varying column lengths in terms of how many numeric values were counted? –  AndMan21 Apr 9 '13 at 21:03
1  
@user2263506 length won't exclude NA values, but you could simply replace it with something like sum(!is.na(dat[,i])). –  joran Apr 9 '13 at 21:11

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