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I'm trying to interpolate, at some user-defined, continuous, 2D x,y position, the value of a 2D function, defined on a regular cartesian mesh (i,j).

What I've tried, is using the function interp2d from scipy.interpolate, to get a function that would, by interpolating with an appropriate model, return a value of f at (x,y).

See the doc :

http://docs.scipy.org/doc/scipy/reference/generated/scipy.interpolate.interp2d.html

The following code reproduces an error that I have. It seems that interp2d crashes because it can't allocate that much memory.

any idea how that could be done otherwise ?

   import scipy.interpolate as interp
   import numpy as np


   def main():
       x = np.arange(4098)/4097.
       z = np.arange(1602)/1601.

       xx,zz = np.meshgrid(x,z)
       f = np.sin(xx**2 + zz**2)

       ff = interp.interp2d(x,z,f, kind='linear')


   if __name__ == '__main__':
       main()
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Are you getting the error with exactly the code shown above, with those size arrays? How much memory do you have? f, xx and zz are under 54 megabytes each. interp2d should have no problem with that. –  Warren Weckesser Apr 10 '13 at 15:00
    
I have the error with the code posted above, with those sizes yes. I get this error : 1.0 1.0 (1602, 4098) (1602, 4098) (1602, 4098) Python(25673) malloc: *** mmap(size=18446744062377512960) failed (error code=12) *** error: can't allocate region –  Heimdall Apr 10 '13 at 16:17
    
Something is seriously wrong there, and I don't think it is interp2d. What OS are you using? 32 or 64 bit? How did you install numpy and scipy? –  Warren Weckesser Apr 10 '13 at 16:43
    
mac os 10.6.8 64bit numpy (1.6.2) and scipy (0.11.0) installed with macports (2.1.2). –  Heimdall Apr 10 '13 at 18:00
    
A couple more questions: Is python from macports also? What is the output of running python -c "from scipy import interpolate; interpolate.test()" in a terminal? –  Warren Weckesser Apr 10 '13 at 19:09
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2 Answers

The issue is that the spline fitting routine makes an extremely pessimistic estimate of how much space is needed in the knot selection (this algorithm: http://netlib.org/dierckx/surfit.f, see description of lwrk2 and do the math in the pessimistic way --- it gives ~200 GB).

Note that this is an unstructured data interpolation routine --- interp2d can also be passed input data that's not on a regular grid. 4098*1602=6564996 is a rather large number of data points for scattered data interpolation, even though it is easily manageable if the data is regularly arranged on a grid, as in this case.

How this works was changed in Scipy 0.12.0, in which interp2d deduces in this case that the data is on a rectangular grid, and uses a more efficient algorithm in this special case.

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Do you really need such a fine meshgrid? You could save memory by reducing the granularity of the grid.

This makes x range from 0 to 1 whith 100 equally spaced points:

   x = np.linspace(0, 1, 100)

import scipy.interpolate as interp
import numpy as np


def main():
   x = np.linspace(0, 1, 100)
   z = np.linspace(0, 1, 100)

   xx,zz = np.meshgrid(x,z)
   f = np.sin(xx**2 + zz**2)

   ff = interp.interp2d(x,z,f, kind='linear')


if __name__ == '__main__':
    main()
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Yeah, I get the grid from a simulation and do need it with this resolution. –  Heimdall Apr 10 '13 at 2:09
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