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Why does this not work?

select *
from
(
    select membership_number
    from members
    where membership_number not like '%[^0-9]%'
) mem
where cast(membership_number as int) > 2

See SQL Fiddle Demo.

The subquery should filter out data that is non numeric, and the outer query is casting this to an integer so that I can look for anything > 2.

It seems like it is running the where clause of the outer query first. How do I get around this?

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Have you run the inner query by itself to ensure it is returning what you expect? –  OldProgrammer Apr 10 '13 at 0:52
2  
Thats cool. i never heard of SQL Fiddle before. –  anthonybell Apr 10 '13 at 0:52
1  
If you look at the execution plan with a slightly modified WHERE it is rolling the sub-query where clause in with the main WHERE: Execution Plan I'm still thinking about how to prevent that behavior. –  Adam Wenger Apr 10 '13 at 0:57
3  
Please check this - T-SQL functions do no imply a certain order of execution rusanu.com/2011/08/10/… –  EricZ Apr 10 '13 at 1:04
1  
For your question, you can use WHERE ISNUMERIC(membership_number) = 1 AND cast(membership_number as int) > 2 –  EricZ Apr 10 '13 at 1:05

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Very interesting, I tried to reproduce this on SQL Server and found next. I changed your query to simple just to make sure that query will not fail and I can see the execution plan:

select *
from
(
    select membership_number
    from members
    where membership_number not like '%[^0-9]%'
) mem
where membership_number > '2'

Execution plan is has Table Scan with predicate:

[master].[dbo].[members].[membership_number]>'2' 
    AND NOT [master].[dbo].[members].[membership_number] like '%[^0-9]%'

So this is because SQL Optimization engine works in this way (as somebody said - nobody can guarantee you the order of where clauses). One of the ways to fix it probably is to use ISNUMERIC before

select *
from
(
    select membership_number
    from members
    where membership_number not like '%[^0-9]%'
) mem
where ISNUMERIC(mem.membership_number) = 1 and cast(mem.membership_number as int) > 2
share|improve this answer

Maybe that:

select *
from
(
    select
        membership_number
    from
        members
    where
        membership_number not like '%[^0-9]%'
) mem
where Try_Convert(int, membership_number) > 2
share|improve this answer
2  
this is supported by sql 2012 only, right? –  Ethan Li Apr 10 '13 at 1:11
    
@EthanLi yes, but in question did not specify a version. –  mkjasinski Apr 10 '13 at 1:13
    
true, just try to make it clear –  Ethan Li Apr 10 '13 at 1:16

I had the issue before. What I did was:

1, you can have a view which does:

select membership_number
    from members
    where membership_number not like '%[^0-9]%'

2, or use temp table for it

3, or use case clause:

select *
from
(
    select membership_number
    from members
    where membership_number not like '%[^0-9]%'
) mem
where (CASE WHEN ISNUMERIC(membership_number) THEN cast(membership_number as int) ELSE 0 END) > 2

did not have a elegant solution, but hope this helps

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The comments explain how the execution plan can (at times) choose to evaluate the cast prior to the like. A case statement can aid the order of evaluation but as Adams mentions even this method is not 100%.

select  *
from    members
where   case
            when membership_number like '%[^0-9]%' then 0
            when cast(membership_number as int) > 2 then 1
            else 0
        end = 1
share|improve this answer
1  
CASE statements do not always short-circuit: Connect item –  Adam Wenger Apr 10 '13 at 1:32
    
@AdamWenger noted in post. +1 –  Nathan Skerl Apr 10 '13 at 3:52
1  
@AdamWenger: in the article, it mentions a specific case with aggregate functions, which are specified to be evaluated first always. In the OP's question, there's no aggregate function, so this shouldn't be a problem. And, as always, test to verify. –  siride Apr 10 '13 at 4:00

You can try this, in following query first condition is executed and if it fails then it won't executes 2nd condition

select
    membership_number
  from
    members
where 
isnumeric(membership_number) = 1 and 
cast(membership_number as int) > 2

And to answer why your query is not working check this explanation here

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