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On the numpy page they give the example of

s = np.random.dirichlet((10, 5, 3), 20)

which is all fine and great; but what if you want to generate random samples from a 2D array of alphas?

alphas = np.random.randint(10, size=(20, 3))

If you try
np.random.dirichlet(alphas),
np.random.dirichlet([x for x in alphas]), or
np.random.dirichlet((x for x in alphas)),

it results in a ValueError: object too deep for desired array. The only thing that seems to work is:

y = np.empty(alphas.shape)
for i in xrange(np.alen(alphas)):
    y[i] = np.random.dirichlet(alphas[i])
    print y

...which is far from ideal for my code structure. Why is this the case, and can anyone think of a more "numpy-like" way of doing this?

Thanks in advance.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

np.random.dirichlet is written to generate samples for a single Dirichlet distribution. That code is implemented in terms of the Gamma distribution, and that implementation can be used as the basis for a vectorized code to generate samples from different distributions. In the following, dirichlet_sample takes an array alphas with shape (n, k), where each row is an alpha vector for a Dirichlet distribution. It returns an array also with shape (n, k), each row being a sample of the corresponding distribution from alphas. When run as a script, it generates samples using dirichlet_sample and np.random.dirichlet to verify that they are generating the same samples (up to normal floating point differences).

import numpy as np


def dirichlet_sample(alphas):
    """
    Generate samples from an array of alpha distributions.

    `alphas` must be a numpy array with shape (n, k).
    """
    r = np.random.standard_gamma(alphas)
    r /= r.sum(-1).reshape(-1, 1)
    return r


if __name__ == "__main__":
    alphas = 2 ** np.random.randint(0, 4, size=(6, 3))

    np.random.seed(1234)
    d1 = dirichlet_sample(alphas)
    print "dirichlet_sample:"
    print d1

    np.random.seed(1234)
    d2 = np.empty(alphas.shape)
    for k in range(len(alphas)):
        d2[k] = np.random.dirichlet(alphas[k])
    print "np.random.dirichlet:"
    print d2

    # Compare d1 and d2:
    err = np.abs(d1 - d2).max()
    print "max difference:", err

Sample run:

dirichlet_sample:
[[ 0.38980834  0.4043844   0.20580726]
 [ 0.14076375  0.26906604  0.59017021]
 [ 0.64223074  0.26099934  0.09676991]
 [ 0.21880145  0.33775249  0.44344606]
 [ 0.39879859  0.40984454  0.19135688]
 [ 0.73976425  0.21467288  0.04556287]]
np.random.dirichlet:
[[ 0.38980834  0.4043844   0.20580726]
 [ 0.14076375  0.26906604  0.59017021]
 [ 0.64223074  0.26099934  0.09676991]
 [ 0.21880145  0.33775249  0.44344606]
 [ 0.39879859  0.40984454  0.19135688]
 [ 0.73976425  0.21467288  0.04556287]]
max difference: 5.55111512313e-17
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Thanks, @WarrenWeckesser. I'll give it a try. –  Noob Saibot Apr 12 '13 at 14:55

I think you're looking for

y = np.array([np.random.dirichlet(x) for x in alphas])

for your list comprehension. Otherwise you're simply passing a python list or tuple. I imagine the reason numpy.random.dirichlet does not accept your list of alpha values is because it's not set up to - it already accepts an array, which it expects to have a dimension of k, as per the documentation.

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1  
This is nicer to look at, but no faster than OP's method. –  askewchan Apr 10 '13 at 3:03
    
Thanks, @BhajunSingh. Is there a way to do this with np.fromiter to minimize the overhead from the python for loop? –  Noob Saibot Apr 10 '13 at 3:03
    
In fact, the loop comprehension is slower than OP's loop... Not sure why. –  askewchan Apr 10 '13 at 3:05

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