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I've an issue with an if statement in my bash script. The goal: I need to check a value of clustered, but since it's not a unique name, I decided to try to match the whole string. For example, to find if clustered is true/false here, the if looks for the whole "neighboring" string.

The issue: while the if statement below works fine for some strings, it actually doesnt work with the values below. I suspect it's because of the double quotations around "false".

Is it possible to change this if, so it will work (i.e. accept the additional double quotations)?

My bash:

if grep -Fxq "<cache clustered="false" " confg.xml
then
    echo "Correct value"
    # code if found
else
    echo "Incorrect value"
    # code if not found
fi

Thank you,

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Use single quotes around the regex. –  jordanm Apr 10 '13 at 4:32

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The problem is that you are using double quotes around the string you are grepping for, as well as in the string itself. Bash interprets quotes by matching each double quote with the next double quote, not the last. If quotes were parentheses, your first line would look like if grep -Fxq (<cache clustered=)false( ) confg.xml when what you really want is if grep -Fxq (<cache clustered=(false) ) confg.xml. In other words, the internal double quotes aren't interpreted as literal double quotes. If you want them to be interpreted literally, enclose your grep expression in single quotes rather than double quotes:

if grep -Fxq '<cache clustered="false" ' confg.xml
share|improve this answer
    
Or, in the general case, use adjacent strings with different quotes. "foo'"'"bar' properly quotes the string foo'"bar -- that's foo' in double quotes adjacent to "bar in single quotes. –  tripleee Apr 10 '13 at 5:13
    
A fun alternative way to put a double quote literally inside double quotes: "blah blah blah "'"'"quote"'"'" blah blah", which is blah blah blah in double quotes, followed by " in single quotes, followed by blah blah in double quotes. It will be interpreted as blah blah blah "quote" blah blah –  Lorkenpeist Apr 10 '13 at 5:26
    
"<cache clustered=\"false\" " seems simpler (than anything except the single-quoted version). BTW, +1 for a nice explanation of nesting and the lack thereof. –  Gordon Davisson Apr 10 '13 at 5:55
    
Hey, thank you all for the replies, it's very appreciated. I went with the single quotes solution, since it was the simplest one to implement. –  Simply_me Apr 17 '13 at 6:44

tried this, seems to work fine

bash$ cat log; if grep -Fxq "<cache clustered=\"false\"" log ; then echo "got it"; else echo "missed"; fi
<cache clustered="false"
got it

the inside double quotes need to be taken as literal. So the backslash ahead of them informs the bash they are not starting or ending of a string

share|improve this answer
    
Hey, thank you all for the replies, it's very appreciated. I went with the single quotes solution, since it was the simplest one to implement. –  Simply_me Apr 17 '13 at 6:44

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