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Say I have a multi dimensional array like the following:

[
   [.1, .2, .9],
   [.3, .4, .5],
   [.2, .4, .8]
]

What would be the best* way to return a single dimension array that contains the highest value from each sub-array ([.9,.5,.8])? I assume I could do it manually doing something like below:

newArray = []
for subarray in array:
   maxItem = 0
   for item in subarray:
       if item > maxItem:
           maxItem = item
   newArray.append(maxItem)

But I'm curious if there is a cleaner way to do this?

*In this case best = fewest lines of code

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1  
Are you using Numpy or not? –  Sheng Apr 10 '13 at 4:41
    
Yes, I am using Numpy –  Abe Miessler Apr 10 '13 at 4:41

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Since you mentioned in a comment that you are using numpy ...

>>> import numpy as np
>>> a = np.random.rand(3,3)
>>> a
array([[ 0.43852835,  0.07928864,  0.33829191],
       [ 0.60776121,  0.02688291,  0.67274362],
       [ 0.2188034 ,  0.58202254,  0.44704166]])
>>> a.max(axis=1)
array([ 0.43852835,  0.67274362,  0.58202254])

edit: the documentation is here

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Interesting, would you recommend this method over using map/max? If so, why? –  Abe Miessler Apr 10 '13 at 4:56
    
Yes, these kind of operations are the strength of numpy ndarrays. It will be faster and efficient because implementation detail is C code. –  wim Apr 10 '13 at 4:58
    
you may get back the exact right floats also (Im not entirely sure you can rely on that... float precision is weird) –  Joran Beasley Apr 10 '13 at 5:00
    
Can you point me towards some documentation for this or explain what axis=1 is doing? –  Abe Miessler Apr 10 '13 at 5:01
    
Thanks for the update. Based on your link it seems that amax is the same as max. Is this correct? –  Abe Miessler Apr 10 '13 at 5:04

map with max is cleaner IMO.

>>> arr = [
...    [.1, .2, .9],
...    [.3, .4, .5],
...    [.2, .4, .8]
... ]
>>> map(max, arr)
[0.9, 0.5, 0.8]

map documentation.

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1  
bah +1 your faster than me –  Joran Beasley Apr 10 '13 at 4:46
1  
Always forget about functional programming options. –  squiguy Apr 10 '13 at 4:47
1  
But if the arr is a numpy.Arrary object,>>> s array([[ 0.1, 0.2, 0.9], [ 0.3, 0.4, 0.5], [ 0.2, 0.4, 0.8]]) the result is >>> map(max, s) [0.90000000000000002, 0.5, 0.80000000000000004], why? –  Sheng Apr 10 '13 at 4:53
    
Scratch that. I also got the results that Sheng is getting. Not a huge deal, but an interesting oddity. –  Abe Miessler Apr 10 '13 at 4:57
    
float inconsistencies .... –  Joran Beasley Apr 10 '13 at 4:59

Using a list comprehension:

maxed = [max(sub_array) for sub_array in array]
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 map(max,my_array)

I think thats pretty short ...

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Try this:

max(array.flatten())
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Maybe instead of the second for loop just use the max function

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