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I have a huge (~2GB) file that I need to navigate around. I don't actually need to edit it, just jump around efficiently.

I tried vim but it choked.

Any recommendations for working with huge files on Linux?

Thanks

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Here is a similar question. –  GeoAvila Oct 19 '09 at 23:40
2  
Vim should be okay as long as you :set binary first... –  ephemient Oct 19 '09 at 23:44
    
This is a good target for a new fuse filesystem! splitfs or something like that... I'm into it! –  rodrigo Jul 29 '11 at 16:58
    
Too late... this already exists: sourceforge.net/projects/joinsplitfs –  rodrigo Jul 29 '11 at 16:59
1  
You need a pager, not an editor sir! See Jim's answer below. –  Lester Cheung Aug 16 '13 at 3:55
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13 Answers

up vote 22 down vote accepted

Vim has a LargeFile plugin for larges files. It will basically configure vim to not use a swap file and undo levels when opening big files (like in Vim Tip 611).

But I think I'd rather use grep and split to navigate in such a file (see Grep with large patterns files).

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regular vim works fairly well as long as you turn of syntax highlighting (:syn off) –  Jim Hurne Jun 3 '13 at 12:10
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I had a 12GB file to edit today. The vim LargeFile plugin did not work for me. It still used up all my memory and then printed an error message :-(. I could not use hexedit for either, as it cannot insert anything, just overwrite. Here is an alternative approach:

You split the file, edit the parts and then recombine it. You still need twice the disk space though.

  • Grep for something surrounding the line you would like to edit:

    grep -n 'something' HUGEFILE | head -n 1
    
  • Extract that range of the file:

    sed -n -e '4,5p' -e '5q' HUGEFILE > SMALLPART
    
    • The -n option is required to suppress the default behaviour of sed to print everything
    • 4,5p prints lines 4 and 5
    • 5q aborts sed after processing line 5
  • Edit SMALLPART using your favourite editor.

  • Combine the file:

    (head -n 3 HUGEFILE; cat SMALLPART; sed -e '1,5d' HUGEFILE) > HUGEFILE.new 
    

    HUGEFILE.new will now be your edited file, you can delete the original HUGEFILE.

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This has been a recurring question for many years. (The numbers keep changing, but the concept is the same: how do I view or edit files that are larger than memory?)

Obviously more or less are good approaches to merely reading the files --- less even offers vi like keybindings for scrolling and searching.

A Freshmeat search on "large files" suggests that two editors would be particularly suited to your needs.

One would be: lfhex ... a large file hex editor (which depends on Qt). That one, obviously, entails using a GUI.

Another would seem to be suited to console use: hed ... and it claims to have a vim-like interface (including an ex mode?).

I'm sure I've seen other editors for Linux/UNIX that were able to page through files without loading their entirety into memory. However, I don't recall any of their names. I'm making this response a "wiki" entry to encourage others to add their links to such editors. (Yes, I am familiar with ways to work around the issue using split and cat; but I'm thinking of editors, especially console/curses editors which can dispense with that and save us the time/latencies and disk space overhead that such approaches entail).

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Since you don't need to actually edit the file:

  1. view (or vim -R) should work reasonably well on large files.
  2. Or you can use more or less
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vim with "-R" still chokes. Less is a good idea. –  hoju Oct 19 '09 at 23:59
    
By "chokes" you mean takes a while to open? Or actually crashes? It takes a bit over 4 minutes on my not-so-recent Linux box to open 2.7GB file in view (just tried and timed). Granted, that's not exactly instant, but it does work. –  ChssPly76 Oct 20 '09 at 0:05
    
Yeah it stalls. I am sure if I waited it would open eventually. I've gone with less because it opens immediately and I'm used to the navigation. –  hoju Oct 20 '09 at 1:14
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'less' works great for this –  Mauritz Hansen Apr 18 '12 at 7:29
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Midnight Commander has built in viewer that handle well large files. Not chocking.

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Just tried this on a large file (albeit not huge) and it quite good –  STW Jan 22 at 22:00
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KrViewer (Krusader -> select file -> press F3) and be amazed

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wow, I am indeed amazed! –  OSdave Mar 10 at 6:43
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It's already late but if you just want to navigate through the file without editing it, 'cat' can do the job too. % cat filename | less

or alternatively simple: % less filename

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emacs works very well with files into the 100's of megabytes, I've used it on log files without too much trouble.

But generally when I have some kind of analysis task, I find writing a perl script a better choice.

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Sublime Text works wonders for me. 2.5G file took a while to load, but I can scroll to my hearts content and jump around instantaneously.

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I had the same problem, but it was a 300GB mysqldump and I wanted to get rid of the DROP and change CREATE TABLE to CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS so didn't want to run two invocations of sed. I wrote this quick ruby script to dupe the file with those changes,

#!/usr/bin/env ruby
#

matchers={
    %q/^CREATE TABLE `foo`/ => %q/CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `foo`/,
    %q/^DROP TABLE IF EXISTS `foo`;.*$/ => "-- DROP TABLE IF EXISTS `foo`;"
}

matchers.each_pair { |m,r|
    STDERR.puts "%s: %s" % [ m, r ]
}

STDIN.each { |line|
    #STDERR.puts "line=#{line}"
    line.chomp!
    unless matchers.length == 0
        matchers.each_pair { |m,r|
            re=/#{m}/
            next if line[re].nil?
            line.sub!(re,r)
            STDERR.puts "Matched: #{m} -> #{r}"
            matchers.delete(m)
            break
        }
    end
    puts line
}

Invoked like

./mreplace.rb < foo.sql > foo_two.sql

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Use Textpad.com on Wine, Textpad is the only editor that I know that can open very large (GB) files without freezing. Unfortunately it's only for Windows.

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Sublime Text editor is something we can work with It works well with large files, although the loading time is long, but it's worth waiting.

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this is old but, use nano, vim or gvim

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3  
by default vim chokes –  hoju Mar 5 '12 at 1:02
2  
These tools do nothing to address the problem. –  Doug Wolfgram Mar 8 '13 at 17:08
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