Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This question already has an answer here:

Just wondering how exactly volatile keyword works internally.

Tried with GCC and Turbo C(DOS based) both cases it behaves in different manners.

volatile int iData;
iData = 5;
printf("%d %d %d %d %d %d\n", ++iData, iData++, iData++, ++iData, iData, iData++);

does the output depend upon printf function data passing or compiler based?

Thank you Cheers !!

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Armin, Alexey Frunze, Adam Rosenfield, NPE, Zeta Apr 10 '13 at 5:11

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

5  
The output can depend on anything you want because your program invokes undefined behavior. And it does so irrespective of iData being or not being volatile. This is a duplicate question. –  Alexey Frunze Apr 10 '13 at 5:11
    
look up ISO/IEC TR3 standard draft section 6.7.3.6. [Link](www.open-std.org/jtc1/sc22/wg14/www/docs/n1570.pdf).the section is not difficult to understand –  Koushik Apr 10 '13 at 5:23
    
Don't try with Turbo C, it doesn't follow any version of the C standard. Furthermore your example is nonsense and relies on both undefined and unspecified behavior. –  Lundin Apr 10 '13 at 6:49
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You are invoking undefined behaviour by modifying iData more than once in the same statement. Since the behaviour is undefined, different compilers can do different things for it and neither of them is wrong. So you really don't want undefined behaviour in your code.

See Could anyone explain these undefined behaviors (i = i++ + ++i , i = i++, etc...) for more details.

Note: the odd behaviour in your code has nothing to do with the volatile keyword. For more information on volatile see Why is volatile needed in c?

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you Scott. I would like to know how exactly volatile works ? –  user2264533 Apr 10 '13 at 5:13
1  
@Planet: Then post a new question. The code in your question has nothing to do with how volatile works because the whole program has undefined behavior due to modifying an object multiple times without an intervening sequence point. –  R.. Apr 10 '13 at 5:22
    
@Planet I added a link at the bottom that should explain volatile. –  Scott Olson Apr 10 '13 at 5:29
add comment